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ISBN:0876091044
Author: Michael Clough
ISBN13: 978-0876091043
Title: Free At Last?: U.S. Policy Toward Africa and the End of the Cold War
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ePUB size: 1310 kb
FB2 size: 1767 kb
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Language: English
Category: Politics and Government
Publisher: NYU Press; 1st Edition edition (June 1, 1992)
Pages: 156

Free At Last?: U.S. Policy Toward Africa and the End of the Cold War by Michael Clough



In Free at Last?, Michael Claugh provides a comprehensive overview of . Africa relations from World War II to the present: he surveys past American initiatives to illustrate how . policy, intent on containing Soviet expansion, benefited African rulers at the expense of African civil society. He also discusses the declining importance of . strategic and economic interests in Africa and how this is counterbalanced by the growing interest of American constituencies focused on such issues as humanitarian relief, human rights, and the environment

This study is a timely primer on . policies in Africa, offering a succinct and critical analysis of past policy choices, plus a set of recommendations that should generate constructive debate. Clough, the senior Africanist at the Council on Foreign Relations, argues that Africa's increasing geopolitical insignificance and its poor economic prospects will render it even more marginal to American interests in the future unless two things occur. global interests in the post-Cold War world need to be radically redefined to give priority to promoting democracy and economic development. While the book properly castigates the "dismal" record of . support for African dictators, it makes no mention of the modest but generally positive record of American bilateral development assistance. Policy Toward Africa And The End Of The Cold War.

When the Cold War began, the United States’ relations with Africa were limited to Egypt, Ethiopia, and Liberia. This was because the rest of the current states on the continent were under colonial rule. Similarly, interactions were confined to the economic, political, and security realms. However, following decolonization in Africa and the concomitant increase in the number of African states, the United States’ relations encompassed several African states. The outcomes this volume has focused on have been political, as well as economic.

Michael Clough, Free at Last? . Donald L. Jordan.

of cold war and toward a new relationship between the United States and Russia was enormous. These two strategic responses to the end of the cold war were not novel ideas. Rather, they reflected two deep traditions in the making of American foreign policy. Regime transformers echoed a tradition as old as the United States itself. During the cold war, one of the staunchest Wilsonians in foreign policy was Republican president Ronald Reagan, who also believed in regime change as a means of enhancing American national security.

S. by Michael Clough. With the end of the Cold War, the United States has an unprecedented opportunity to create a new policy toward Africa freed from the constraints of East-West geopolitics. In "Free at Last?," Michael Claugh provides a comprehensive overview of .

The Journal of Modern African Studies English Français. The Journal of Modern African Studies. Policy Toward Africa and the End of the Cold War by Michael Clough New York, Council on Foreign Relations Press, 1992. Economic Policy Toward Africa by Jeffrey Herbst New York, Council on Foreign Relations Press, 1992. F. Ugboaja Ohaegbulam (a1). Department of Government and International Affairs, The University of South Florida, Tampa. Published online: 11 November 2008. Export citation Request permission.

In "Free at Last?", Michael Clough provides an overview of US-Africa relations from World War II to the present. He surveys past American initiatives to illustrate how US policy, intent on containing Soviet expansion, benefited African rulers at the expense of African civil society. He also discusses the declining importance of US strategic and economic interests in Africa and how this is counterbalanced by the growing interest of American constituencies focused on such issues as humanitarian relief, human rights and the environment.

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Policy Toward Africa and the End of the Cold War: Free At Last?: . Policy Toward Africa and the End of the Cold War: ISBN 9780876091043 (978-0-87609-104-3) Softcover, NYU Press, 1992. Reassessing the Soviet Challenge in Africa (Policy Papers in International Affairs). ISBN 9780877255253 (978-0-87725-525-3) Softcover, Univ of California Intl &, 1986. Founded in 1997, BookFinder. Coauthors & Alternates. Learn More at LibraryThing. Michael Clough at LibraryThing.

With the end of the Cold War, the United States has an unprecedented opportunity to create a new policy toward Africa freed from the constraints of East-West geopolitics.

In Free at Last?, Michael Claugh provides a comprehensive overview of U.S.-Africa relations from World War II to the present: he surveys past American initiatives to illustrate how U.S. policy, intent on containing Soviet expansion, benefited African rulers at the expense of African civil society. He also discusses the declining importance of U.S. strategic and economic interests in Africa and how this is counterbalanced by the growing interest of American constituencies focused on such issues as humanitarian relief, human rights, and the environment.

Clough proposes abandoning traditional, government-to- government diplomatic approaches in favor of a radical new strategy modeled on the successes achieved in combating famine in Ethiopia and ending apartheid in South Africa. Offering an unconventional look at U.S. policy, Free at Last? is absorbing and essential reading for anyone concerned with both U.S.- Africa relations and the future of U.S. policy toward the Third World.