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ISBN:0674047664
Author: Gary Jeffrey Jacobsohn
ISBN13: 978-0674047662
Title: Constitutional Identity
Format: azw docx lrf lit
ePUB size: 1711 kb
FB2 size: 1164 kb
DJVU size: 1804 kb
Language: English
Category: Politics and Government
Publisher: Harvard University Press (October 25, 2010)
Pages: 388

Constitutional Identity by Gary Jeffrey Jacobsohn



He explores constitutional identity’s great practical importance for some of constitutionalism’s most vexing questions: Is an unconstitutional constitution possible?

Jacobsohn, Gary . 1946-. Publication, Distribution, et. Cambridge, Mass. Rubrics: Constitutional law Philosophy Law Foreign influences.

In Constitutional Identity, Gary Jeffrey Jacobsohn argues that a constitution acquires an identity through experience-from a mix of the political aspirations and commitments that express a nation's past and the desire to transcend that past

CONSTITUTIONS AND NATIONAL IDENTITY - Gary Jeffrey Jacobsohn: Constitutional Identity. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2010. Published online: 02 March 2012.

Gary Jeffrey Jacobsohn offers rich insights on the problems of constitutional identity; this is a seminal work in comparative constitutionalism and constitutional theory. The mere attempt to think about these problems is a worthwhile endeavor. Mark Graber, University of Maryland School of Law). I won't waste my time by providing a list of adjectives. Please invoke all that you can think of that praise this as a superb work. I'm both surprised and delighted that someone has the learning and imagination to write such a sweeping book.

Description this book In Constitutional Identity, Gary Jeffrey Jacobsohn argues that a constitution acquires an identity through experienceâ€,from a mix of the political aspirations and commitments that express a nation’s past and the desire to transcend that past. It is changeable but resistant to its own destruction, and manifests itself in various ways, as Jacobsohn shows in examples as far flung as India, Ireland, Israel, and the United States.

In Constitutional Identity, Gary Jeffrey Jacobsohn argues that a constitution acquires an identity through experience―from a mix of the political aspirations and commitments that express a nation’s past and the desire to transcend that past. It is changeable but resistant to its own destruction, and manifests itself in various ways, as Jacobsohn shows in examples as far flung as India, Ireland, Israel, and the United States.

Jacobsohn argues that the presence of disharmony―both the tensions within a constitutional order and those that exist between a constitutional document and the society it seeks to regulate―is critical to understanding the theory and dynamics of constitutional identity. He explores constitutional identity’s great practical importance for some of constitutionalism’s most vexing questions: Is an unconstitutional constitution possible? Is the judicial practice of using foreign sources to resolve domestic legal disputes a threat to vital constitutional interests? How are the competing demands of transformation and preservation in constitutional evolution to be balanced?