» » The Wahhabi Mission and Saudi Arabia (Library of Modern Middle East Studies)
Download The Wahhabi Mission and Saudi Arabia (Library of Modern Middle East Studies) epub book
ISBN:184885014X
Author: David Commins
ISBN13: 978-1848850149
Title: The Wahhabi Mission and Saudi Arabia (Library of Modern Middle East Studies)
Format: lrf azw rtf mobi
ePUB size: 1733 kb
FB2 size: 1763 kb
DJVU size: 1309 kb
Language: English
Category: Politics and Government
Publisher: I.B.Tauris (April 15, 2009)
Pages: 296

The Wahhabi Mission and Saudi Arabia (Library of Modern Middle East Studies) by David Commins



The Wahhabi Mission and Saudi Arabia. Library of Modern Middle East Studies 50. Published in 2006 by . Tauris & Co Ltd 6 Salem Road, London W2 4BU 175 Fifth Avenue, New York NY 10010 ww. btauris. In the United States of America and in Canada distributed by Palgrave Macmillan, a division of St Martin’s Press 175 Fifth Avenue, New York NY 10010.

Muslim critics have dismissed it as a heretical innovation that manipulated a backward people to gain political control. He also assesses the challenges that it faces from radical militants within the Kingdom.

Mobile version (beta). The Wahhabi Mission and Saudi Arabia (Library of Modern Middle East Studies). Download (pdf, . 6 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Commins' seems to play down the role of Wahhabi thought and its dominance within Saudi Arabia for the creation of men like Osama bin Laden. Commins seems to place more of the blame on the influence of the Islamic Brotherhood and men like Qutb, but it seems to me that the dominance of Wahhabism in Saudi Arabia creates fertile breeding ground for these radicals

David Commins dismisses the clichés, examines the nature of Wahhabism, and offers original findings as to how Wahhabism rose to dominance in Arabia and projected its influence in the Muslim world. Users who liked this book, also liked. Jihad in Saudi Arabia: Violence and Pan-Islamism since 1979 (Cambridge.

International Journal of Middle East Studies. David Commins The Wahhabi Mission and Saudi Arabia, Library of Modern Middle East Studies 50 (London: I. B. Tauris, 2006).

Uploaded by. Samer Traboulsi.

David Commins' book questions this assumption. He examines the debate on the nature of Wahhabism, and offers original findings on its ascendance in Saudi Arabia and spread throughout other parts of the Muslim world such as Afghanistan and Pakistan. He also assesses the challenge that radical militants within Saudi Arabia pose to the region, and draws conclusions which will concern all those who follow events in the Kingdom. Publisher description. Abd alAziz ibn Saud and the Taming of Wahhabi Zeal. 71. Wahhabism in a Modern State. David Commins dismisses the clichés, examines the nature of Wahhabism, and offers original findings as to how Wahhabism rose to dominance in Arabia and projected its influence in the Muslim world.

Wahhabism has been generating controversy since it first emerged in Arabia in the 18th century. In the wake of September 11th instant theories have emerged that try to root Osama Bin Laden's attacks on Wahhabism. Muslim critics have dismissed this conservative interpretation of Islam that is the official creed of Saudi Arabia as an unorthodox innovation that manipulated a suggestible people to gain political influence. David Commins' book questions this assumption. He examines the debate on the nature of Wahhabism, and offers original findings on its ascendance in Saudi Arabia and spread throughout other parts of the Muslim world such as Afghanistan and Pakistan. He also assesses the challenge that radical militants within Saudi Arabia pose to the region, and draws conclusions which will concern all those who follow events in the Kingdom. The Wahhabi Mission and Saudi Arabia is essential reading for anyone interested in the Middle East and Islamic radicalism today.

Reviews: 7
CrazyDemon
This is an impressive work. The depth of the author's knowledge and understanding of his subject is readily apparent to the reader. Not only that but Mr. Commins has that rare ability to convey that knowledge to the lay reader in a way that is easily understandable and accessible. So many times I find that authors who have such an impressive grasp on a topic such as this they end up losing the ability to communicate that knowledge to anyone who is not on their level of understanding. This book did not come off like that at all, and I have greatly enhanced my own knowledge by reading Mr. Commins' book.

Islam in general is much misunderstood by us here in the West, but Wahhabism seems to be completely shrouded in mystery for all but the scholars or experts on this isolated sect of Islam. It seems as though we are either completely ignorant of Wahhabism or we seem to be terrified of it. This book really helps to give the reader a better perspective of just what Wahhabism is and what its adherents believe. Understanding is an important tool that many in the West lack and this book is important to rectify our inherent lack of understanding of Islam and the people of Saudi Arabia. This book helped to dispel some of the myths and outright distortions I held in regards to Wahhabi doctrine and belief.

The author goes into great detail discussing the difficulties between such a conservative religious doctrine and the State that endorses it. Both the religion and the state have an uneasy marriage since the state derives much of its legitimacy form religion but yet the state strives for modernity while the religion clings to its conservative past. The religious leaders walk a delicate path between doing what their religion requires of them and sanctioning state actions. The religious leaders need the state's backing to retain power and dominance but yet their acquiescence to state demands hurts their own legitimacy with their religious followers.

The state also walks a fine line between endorsing the Wahhabis and the need to limit certain radical elements within their society. The main problem is the Wahhabis who have become disillusioned with their religious leaders and their seemingly subservient role to the state. These disillusioned masses have begun to incorporate other philosophies and schools of thought with their own brand of conservative Wahhabi belief, and this mixture has proved volatile for not just Saudi Arabia but the world as a whole. Groups like al Qaeda are the spawns of this new mixture.

This book is obviously the definitive and authoritative account of the history of Wahhabism up to the present, but I did have one problem with the book. Commins' seems to play down the role of Wahhabi thought and its dominance within Saudi Arabia for the creation of men like Osama bin Laden. Commins seems to place more of the blame on the influence of the Islamic Brotherhood and men like Qutb, but it seems to me that the dominance of Wahhabism in Saudi Arabia creates fertile breeding ground for these radicals. The fact that all outside influences are suppressed and conservative Wahhabi doctrines are forced on the whole population means that much of the population has no defense against radical ideas. They were not brought up to question ideas but instead were taught to block independent thought. The educational system and the religious systems seem to me to be, if not directly, then at least indirectly to blame for the current radicalization of certain elements within Saudi society.

These are just thoughts I came to conclude. This book is very good and is work that needs to be read and reread. The author has done an amazing job. I highly recommend this book to everyone. Of course my second criticism would be the price tag. I think this is going to limit the books readership and that's a shame. I hope the publishers will produce a soft cover that will be a lot less expensive. If you can afford to splurge on a book though, I recommend it be this one.
melody of you
Of the recent spate of books on Wahhabism, this is by far and away the best. David Commins is better qualified to write on Saudi fundamentalism than just about any other scholar I know. He speaks and reads Arabic with a fluency very few non-natives can match, having lived in the Middle East off and on for many years over the last three decades. He spent over a year researching this in Saudi Arabia as a senior Fulbright Fellow. More importantly, Commins has written on Salafism and religion in the Middle his entire career. This is not a 9-11 inspiration. His earlier book on Salafism and religious reform in Syria is also a masterpiece and should be read in conjunction with this. Commins' knowledge of Islamic movements throughout the Middle East gives him a unique ability to place the Wahhabi movement in the broader context it requires. He compares it to the doctrines of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt and makes judgements throughout that are insightful and wise. Invariably, he strikes the right balance in explaining what was new about Wahhabism and why it developed as it did.

At the time of the Hama massacre in Syria, Commins was living in Damascus. Even then, he was studying the Muslim Brotherhood and Salafism as one of the last students of Richard P. Mitchell, who wrote the classic work on Hassan al-Banna and the Egyptian Brotherhood, "The Society of the Muslim Brothers."

Syrian Authorities told Commins to shave the beard he was wearing 1982 so as not to be arrested on suspicion of belonging to the Ikhwan. Commins befriended Baathist and Muslim Brother alike in his effort to understand all sides of the contentious history and modern debate over Islamic puritanism. In his most recent book, he continues with the same even-handedness and ability to record the voices and opinions of all sides. Commins writes lucidly and compellingly. He does not try to obscure his own opinions, but never lets them get in the way of the sources themselves. This is a brilliant book and a pleasure to read.