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ISBN:0300070527
Author: Ben Kiernan
ISBN13: 978-0300070521
Title: The Pol Pot Regime: Race, Power, and Genocide in Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge, 1975-79
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ePUB size: 1723 kb
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Language: English
Category: Politics and Government
Publisher: Yale University Press (February 17, 1998)
Pages: 512

The Pol Pot Regime: Race, Power, and Genocide in Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge, 1975-79 by Ben Kiernan



In their American uniforms they looked like troops of the defeated Saigon regime. It was April, the hottest time of the year in Cambodia, and they must have been relieved to get there. Dressed in khaki uniforms and . army boots, white sweat bands on their wrists, they dripped with grenades and firearms. made M-16 rifles, others M-79 grenade launchers and packs of rice rations.

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The Khmer Rouge revolution turned Cambodia into grisly killing fields, as the Pol Pot regime murdered or starved to death a million and a half of Cambodia's eight million inhabitants. This book - the first comprehensive study of the Pol Pot regime - describes the violent origins, social context, and course of the revolution, providing a new answer to the question of why a group of Cambodian intellectuals imposed genocide on their own country. The making of the 1975 Khmer Rouge victory - Cleansing the cities: the quest for total power - Cleansing the countryside: race, power, and the party, 1973-75 - Cleansing the frontiers: neighbors, friends, and enemies, 1975-76 - An indentured agrarian state, 1975-77 - The base areas - The southwest and the east - An indentured agrarian state, 1975-77 - Peasants and deportees in the northwest - Ethnic cleansing

The Khmer Rouge revolution turned Cambodia into grisly killing fields, as the Pol Pot regime murdered or starved to death a million and a half of Cambodia's eight million inhabitants. He then provides a nearly 500 page systematic study of the Pol Pot regime. Kiernan breaks the study down into three parts. The first segment discusses the very early days of the DPK and their paranoid attempt to cling to their hard-won power by emptying the cities, creating agrarian communes and exterminating the human remenants of the Lon Nol era, 1970-75. Kiernan labels this section, "Wiping the Slate Clean.

The Pol Pot Regime: Race, Power, and Genocide in Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge, 1975-79. The Pol Pot Regime: Race, Power, and Genocide in Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge, 1975-79. Download (chm, . 3 Mb). Epub FB2 PDF mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

The Pol Pot Regime book. Although it was indigenous, Pol Pot’s revolution would not have won power without . economic and military destabilization of Cambodia which began in 1966 after the American escalation in next-door Vietnam and peaked in 1969-73 with the carpet bombing of Cambodia’s countryside by American B-52s. This was probably the most important single factor in Pol Pot’s rise.

The Khmer Rouge genocide stands as one of the most terrible instances of human injustice in modern memory. The methods of Pol Pot and his contemporaries, and the outcomes of their approaches to make their control of the population absolute, are examined as a study in systematic imposition of evil on a society. The article is an assessment of the Khmer Rouge regime through the lens of administrative evil, drawing from literature on hatred, paranoia, and belief as organizing and motivating forces, the legitimation of bureaucratic malevolence, and the teleology of historical agency. The Khmer Rouge–led Cambodian genocide took place between 1975 and 1979 and resulted in one to three million out of seven million Cambodians losing their lives as a result of executions, violence, forced labor, starvation, and disease (Kiernan, 1996).

Ben Kiernan, who made his name with his earlier book and doctoral thesis How Pol Pot came to power, here moves on to the considerably more problematic and traumatic sequel of what Pol Pot did once in power. Kiernan wields his familiar combination of a detailed incisive scalpel and a broad analytical interpretation, giving us the first really considered understanding of what really was going on in Democratic Kampuchea, whose length of time Cambodians inevitably recall with exact detail  . According to Kiernan's calculations, at least 1,671,000 people (some 21% of the entire 1975 population) died under Pol Pot. The carnage moved through various categories of "enemies" and "spies", mostly condemned for serving foreign interests.

Geographic Name: Cambodia Politics and government 1975-1979. Rubrics: Communism Cambodia Atrocities. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book The Pol Pot regime : race, power, and genocide in Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge, 1975-79, Ben Kiernan.

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The Khmer Rouge revolution turned Cambodia into grisly killing fields, as the Pol Pot regime murdered or starved to death a million and a half of Cambodia's eight million inhabitants. This book—the first comprehensive study of the Pol Pot regime—describes the violent origins, social context, and course of the revolution, providing a new answer to the question of why a group of Cambodian intellectuals imposed genocide on their own country.Ben Kiernan draws on more than five hundred interviews with Cambodian refugees, survivors, and defectors, as well as on a rich collection of previously unexplored archival material from the Pol Pot regime (including Pol Pot's secret speeches). He recounts how in the first few days after Cambodia became Democratic Kampuchea in 1975, authorities evacuated all cities, closed hospitals, schools, monasteries, and factories, and abolished the use of money. For nearly four years, the country was a prison-camp state, the countryside was "cleansed" of minorities, and a savage war was fought against Vietnam. Exploring the nature of the regime that enforced such a revolution, Kiernan shows that its atrocities—the widespread massacres, forced assimilation of minorities, and foreign alliances and wars—can be explained by its ideological preoccupation with racist and totalitarian policies. Kiernan concludes with a description of the resistance movements that sprang up and the destruction of the regime by Vietnamese forces in 1979.
Reviews: 7
Centrizius
Dictators never change. Know your history and other countries histories. Look around you now and see after you read this book if you don't see a pattern. Pol pot wiped out intellectuals. Then had the people turn on each other. All freedoms were removed. Then the killing fields. It all happened right under the worlds nose and they did nothing to stop it. Next you see or hear about UN intervention know that they have never NEVER stopped genocide and mass murder. Pol pot is a good example of someone left to kill his own people and get away with it.
ℳy★†ỦrÑ★ Wiℓℒ★₡oℳ€★TøØ
This is a great book that helped me understand Pol Pot-Ieng Sery and the insanity of their regime. I never did, for example, understand why they evacuated Phnom Penh. After reading Kiernan's book, however, I understand their reasoning. Their logic was twisted, not to mention incredibly cruel, but I now have some understanding of the reasoning underlying their decisions.

Kiernan's book holds a special resonance for me because my wife is grew up in Svay Reng Province. But she was born in 1980, right after the Pol Pot-Ieng Sery regime fell and because her parents, understandably, don't want talk about their experiences during the Vietnam War and life under Pol Pot, she hasn't been able to shed much light on this period of history. I read with a great deal of interest the chapters dealing with the east --Svay Reng, Prey Veng, and Kompong Cham Provinces and found them very illuminating in light of the little bit I have learned of her family's history, most of whom were killed by Pol Pot.

Having been to Cambodia on numerous occasions, I have been to many of the towns and villages that are discussed in the book. I found the chapters describing the uprising in the east, along Highway 7 and Highway 1, in Prey Veng and Svay Reng Provinces, particularly interesting, mostly because I am familiar with those areas and understand where the various battles took place. The book also gave me an understanding of Cambodia's minorities, particularly the Cham. Aside from the fact that the Cham are Muslim, I had no idea where they came from and knew little of their experiences under Pol Pot.

My only criticism -- which given the author's purpose probably should not count as a criticism -- is the inclusion of numerous, lengthy first hand accounts (which are basically the same) of life in the various districts during the Pol Pot era. For a lay reader the exhaustive and, often repetitive nature of these accounts, added little to my understanding. These sections could have been shortened considerably. But, I think the book, which was in any event very readable, was intended as an academic criticism of other works and therefore I understand Mr. Kiernan's decision to marshal a large amount of material to bolster his claims.

On the whole, I recommend this book, as well as its prequel (which I also read) to anyone interested in Cambodia, the Vietnam War, or even, to borrow a phrase, the "origins of totalitarianism."
Phallozs Dwarfs
This is a dense, intensely researched and documented account of the short-lived but immensely destructive Khmer Rouge regime. In fact the sheer density might be too much for general reader. At times it reads more like a series of police reports than a comprehensive history. This makes it a clunky read, but is also a strength for Kiernan as he relies heavily on first-hand accounts of regular Cambodians who lived through the Khmer Rouge to illustrate the real-world effects of regime's warped vision put to practice.
For those new to the subject, I would recommend reading Elizabeth Becker's "When the War Was Over" first, before tackling Kiernan.
Whitestone
Very well researched and written. There is not much written about post-Vietnam war SE Asian history in neighboring Cambodia and Laos. This book examines the Cambodian leaders, their motives and how they assumed power. The regime's rise to power was very calculated and involved many different factions throughout Indochina. The vast amount of information and detail really tells the story of Cambodia after the end of the Vietnam war.
Alsantrius
Without argument, Ben Kiernan is one of the the top Cambodia scholars working on the subject today. He has been in and out of Cambodia since the 1970's, including a trip shorty after the fall of the DPK in 1980. In 1995, Khmer Rouge forces even accused Kiernan of being a "war criminal," beaming the macbre message from guerrilla radio stations along the Thai border.

The Pol Pot Regime, a follow up to Kiernan's How Pol Pot Came to Power, begins with the DPK takeover following the fall of the Lon Nol government. He then provides a nearly 500 page systematic study of the Pol Pot regime.

Kiernan breaks the study down into three parts. The first segment discusses the very early days of the DPK and their paranoid attempt to cling to their hard-won power by emptying the cities, creating agrarian communes and exterminating the human remenants of the Lon Nol era, 1970-75.

Kiernan labels this section, "Wiping the Slate Clean." Indeed, that is exactly what the Khmer Rouge intended to do, wipe the 'slate,' Cambodia, clean- in order to usher in a new era, even going so far as to declare 1975 Year Zero.

Following "Wiping the Slate Clean," Kiernan begins to discuss the evolution and implementation of Khmer Rouge policies. It seems as though the ultimate goal of these radical Marxists was to create an agrarian utopia regardles of cost, even at the risk of turning the nation into one giant charnel house. Following the forced exodus of all major towns and cities, Cambodians were forced into the countryside to grow rice which the DPK felt would lead to the re-emegence of the great Khmer power of the past. The result was starvation and disease on a scale never before seen.

Although production was quite high, the Khmer people were placed on starvation rations. Nearly all surplus rice was exported in exchange for goods and military hardware to support the emerging bloody conflict with neighboring Vietnam. This leads us to Kiernan's third section illustrating the subsequent demise of the DPK.

As the war with Vietnam began to escalate, so did paranoia within the Party Cental. "Enemies" were ferreted out and executed, including numerous high ranking cadre and military commanders. In 1977, the purges were spiraling out of control. It wasn't long until a small contingent of DPK leaders grew fearful and disillusioned with the Central Party. A number of now famous commanders, most notably the current Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen, fled to Vietnam and garnered support for the liberation of Kampuchea. Kiernan does an excellent and indepth job of studying the stucture of the DPK purges and why they lead to the ultimate collapse of the Pol Pot regime.

The Eastern Zone of Cambodia, from where the liberation leadership emerged, was was the most heavily purged, not only due to it's close proximity to Vietnam, but also because the Eastern Zone cadre, from the earliest days of the revolution, tended to be less brutal in their treatment of Cambodians, essentially making them weak in the eyes of the Party leadership.

Aside from exterminating native Khmer's, the Pol Pot regime launched pogroms against any ethnic minorities, claiming those who were not pure Khmer were in possession of Vietnames minds.
It would seem that the DPK was seeking not only an agrarian utopia, but one that also preserved racial purtiy.

In conclusion, Kiernan's work is an invaluable source for one working to understand the intricacies of Cambodia during the 1970's. The Pol Pot Regime was the main source I used prior to visiting Cambodia and although it only covers a brief segment of Cambodian history, it still was extremely helpful in understanding the people and their terribly sad past.