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ISBN:1421408139
Author: Kathryn Stoner,Michael McFaul
ISBN13: 978-1421408132
Title: Transitions to Democracy: A Comparative Perspective
Format: azw lrf mbr lit
ePUB size: 1699 kb
FB2 size: 1232 kb
DJVU size: 1521 kb
Language: English
Category: Politics and Government
Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press (April 15, 2013)
Pages: 456

Transitions to Democracy: A Comparative Perspective by Kathryn Stoner,Michael McFaul



Their model builds upon Guillermo O’Donnell, Philippe C. Schmitter, and Laurence Whitehead's classic work, Transitions from Authoritarian Rule, using a rubric of four identifying factors that can be applied to each case study, making comparison relatively easy. Transitions to Democracy yields strong comparisons and insights.

Kathryn Stoner is a senior fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, deputy director of the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law, and faculty director of the Susan Ford Dorsey Program in International Policy Studies at Stanford University. Michael McFaul the Peter and Helen Bing Sr. Fellow at the Hoover Institution and a professor of political pcience at Stanford University. Previously he served as senior director for Russia in the National Security Council of President Barack Obama.

Home . Details for: Transitions to democracy : Normal view MARC view ISBD view. Contributor(s): Stoner, Kathryn, 1965- McFaul, Michael, 1963- Title notes.

This book argues the necessity for social professionals working locally to equip themselves with knowledge of global mechanisms and cross-cultural issues. Local level examples include the increase in victims of trafficking or the effects of HIV/AIDS on some immigrant groups Traditions & Encounters: A Global Perspective on the Past, Vol. 1 From the Beginning to 1500. Sorry! We have not found any description on this book!

Michael McFaul-described by the New York Times as "one of the leading Russia experts in the United States"-traces Russia's tumultuous political history from Gorbachev's rise to power in 1985 through the 1999 resignation of Boris Yeltsin in favor of Vladimir Putin. The first two were, he believes, failures-failed institutional emergence or failed transitions to democracy. In writing a book about the transition from communist rule in Russia, I wanted to have an idea of where the Russian political system had transited to. Ten years after the collapse of the Soviet Union, it still seems too early to know.

Transitions to democracy in Southern Europe and Latin America did not cause, trigger, or inspire communist regime change. The temporal proximity of these cases was more accidental than causal. As explored in detail in this article, however, the fact that Southern European and Latin American transitions occurred first had significant path-dependent consequences for how we conceptualized and explained the postcommunist transitions. 41 A similar argument is made in Bratton, Michael and van de Walle, Nicolas, Democratic Experiments in Africa: Regime Transitions in Comparative Perspective (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997), 198–200. 42 Blaney,, The Causes of War (New York: Free Press, 1973), 246. 43 Huntington (fn.

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With Kathryn Stoner, Transitions to Democracy: A Comparative Perspective (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013). With Kathryn Stoner-Weiss and Valerie Bunce, Democracy and Authoritarianism in the Postcommunist World (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009). With Amichai Magen and Tomas Risse, Promoting Democracy and the Rule of Law: American and European Strategies (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009). With Anders Aslund, Revolution in Orange: The Origins of Ukraine's Democratic Breakthrough (Washington: Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 2006).

As demonstrated by current events in Tunisia and Egypt, oppressive regimes are rarely immune to their citizens’ desire for democratic government. Of course, desire is always tempered by reality; therefore how democratic demands are made manifest is a critical source of study for both political scientists and foreign policy makers. What issues and consequences surround the fall of a government, what type of regime replaces it, and to what extent are these efforts successful? Kathryn Stoner and Michael McFaul have created an accessible book of fifteen case studies from around the world that will help students understand these complex issues. Their model builds upon Guillermo O’Donnell, Philippe C. Schmitter, and Laurence Whitehead's classic work, Transitions from Authoritarian Rule, using a rubric of four identifying factors that can be applied to each case study, making comparison relatively easy.

Transitions to Democracy yields strong comparisons and insights. For instance, the study reveals that efforts led by the elite and involving the military are generally unsuccessful, whereas mass mobilization, civic groups, and new media have become significant factors in supporting and sustaining democratic actors. This collection of writings by scholars and practitioners is organized into three parts: successful transitions, incremental transitions, and failed transitions. Extensive primary research and a rubric that can be applied to burgeoning democracies offer readers valuable tools and information.