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Download A Secular Humanist Declaration epub book
ISBN:0879751495
Author: Paul Kurtz
ISBN13: 978-0879751494
Title: A Secular Humanist Declaration
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ePUB size: 1791 kb
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Language: English
Category: Philosophy
Publisher: Prometheus Books (June 1, 1983)
Pages: 29

A Secular Humanist Declaration by Paul Kurtz



Paul Kurtz (1925-2012; author of Manifesto II and Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at the State University of New York at Buffalo) again drafted this document, and said in the Introduction, "some of the critics of secular humanism maintain that it is a dangerous philosophy .

A Secular Humanist Declaration was an argument for and statement of support for democratic secular humanism. The document was issued in 1980 by the Council for Democratic and Secular Humanism ("CODESH"), now the Council for Secular Humanism ("CSH"). Compiled by Paul Kurtz, it is largely a restatement of the content of the American Humanist Association's 1973 Humanist Manifesto II, of which he was co-author with Edwin H. Wilson. It differs from the other three in that it is a full-length book rather than essay-length, and was published not by the American Humanist Association but by the Council for Secular Humanism. In it, Kurtz argues for many of the points already formulated in Humanist Manifesto 2, of which he had been co-author in 1973.

A Secular Humanist Declaration book. A Secular Humanist Declaration, the sequel to Humanist Manifesto I and II, is a significant statement setting forth the views of prominent scholars and writers in defense of free inquiry, science, reason, and democracy. At a time when religious fundamentalism is gaining adherents worldwide, the Declaration defends the separation of church and state, skepticism about supern A Secular Humanist Declaration, the sequel to Humanist Manifesto I and II, is a significant statement setting forth the views of prominent scholars and writers in defense of free inquiry, science, reason, and democracy.

Paul Kurtz, a philosopher whose advocacy of reason ahead of faith helped define contemporary secular humanism, died on Saturday at his home in Amherst, . He was 86. He had been treated for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, said his son, Jonathan, who is the president of Prometheus Books, the publishing house his father founded in 1969, and who confirmed the death. Professor Kurtz taught philosophy at the University at Buffalo, part of the State University of New York, from 1965 until his retirement as professor emeritus in 1991. But his wider influence came as a publisher of books and.

Secular Humanism Defined A Secular Humanist Declaration Affirmations of Humanism. About Hours & Contact Ingersoll Biography Audio Recordings Annual Newsletter Become a Friend of the Museum. Secular humanism is a vital force in the contemporary world. It is now under unwarranted and intemperate attack from various quarters. This declaration defends only that form of secular humanism which is explicitly committed to democracy. It is opposed to all varieties of belief that seek supernatural sanction for their values or espouse rule by dictatorship. Democratic secular humanism has been a powerful force in world culture. Paul Kurtz (Professor of Philosophy, State University of New York at Buffalo). Joseph Margolis (professor of philosophy, Temple University). Floyd Matson (professor of American Studies, University of Hawaii).

A Secular Humanist Declaration," the sequel to "Humanist Manifesto I and II," is a significant statement setting forth the views of prominent scholars and writers in defense of free inquiry, science, reason, and democracy.

TYPE : PDF. Download Now. Home Philosophy Evolutionary Humanism. The document was issued in 1980 by the Council for Democratic and Secular Humanism (CODESH), now the Council for Secular Humanism (CSH).

A Secular Humanist Declaration, the sequel to Humanist Manifesto I and II, is a significant statement setting forth the views of prominent scholars an. .Category: Philosophy. People Who Read A Secular Humanist Declaration Also Read. Inspired by Your Browsing History. People Who Read A Secular Humanist Declaration Also Read

A secular humanist declaration. A secular humanist declaration Close. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove A secular humanist declaration from your list? A secular humanist declaration. Published 1980 by Prometheus Books in Amherst, . Religious Humanism, Secularism, Humanism.

A Secular Humanist Declaration, the sequel to Humanist Manifesto I and II, is a significant statement setting forth the views of prominent scholars and writers in defense of free inquiry, science, reason, and democracy. At a time when religious fundamentalism is gaining adherents worldwide, the Declaration defends the separation of church and state, skepticism about supernatural claims, and the conviction that ethics can be developed independently of belief in God.Its publication, reported on the front page of the New York Times and featured in newspapers and magazines throughout the world, has provoked intense controversy and debate.Some Excerpts:The first principle of democratic secular humanism is its commitment tofree inquiry . . .Countless millions of thoughtful persons have espoused secular humanistideals . . . and have contributed to the building of a more humane anddemocratic world . . .We deplore the growth of intolerant sectarian creeds that foster hatred . . .We do not believe that any one church should impose its views on moral virtue and sin, sexual conduct, marriage, divorce, birth control, or abortion, or legislate them for the rest of society . . .We do not think it is moral to baptize infants, to confirm adolescents, or to impose a religious creed on young people before they are able to consent . . .We deplore the efforts by fundamentalists . . . to invade the science classrooms, requiring that creationist theory be taught to students . . .The media . . . are inordinately dominated by a pro-religious bias. The views of preachers, faith healers, and religious hucksters go largely unchallenged . . .
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Humanists, you might say, like to write "Manifestos" [see Humanist Manifestos I and II (No. I & II)]; the first was written in 1933, and the second in 1973. The third was written in 2003, and in-between this had been this 1980 "Declaration," the 1988 "A Declaration of Interdependence," the 1996 "IHEU Minimum Statement on Humanism," the Humanist Manifesto 2000: A Call for New Planetary Humanism, and the 2002 "Amsterdam Declaration."

Paul Kurtz (1925-2012; author of Manifesto II and Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at the State University of New York at Buffalo) again drafted this document, and said in the Introduction, "some of the critics of secular humanism maintain that it is a dangerous philosophy. Some assert that it is 'morally corrupting' because it is committed to individual freedom... We who support democratic secular humanism deny such charges... and we seek to outline a set of principles that most of us share... Many religious believers will no doubt share with us a belief in many secular humanist and democratic values, and we welcome their joining with us in the defense of these ideals." (Pg. 10)

The Declaration is divided into sections on Free Inquiry ("We oppose any tyranny over the mind of man, any efforts by ecclesiastical, political, ideological, or social institutions to shackle free thought"; pg. 10); Separation of Church and State ("wherever one religion or ideology is established and given a dominant position in the state, minority opinions are in jeopardy"; pg. 12); The Ideal of Freedom ("we consistently defend... genuine political liberty, democratic decision-making based upon majority rule"; pg. 13); Ethics Based on Critical Intelligence ("their goal is to develop autonomous and responsible individuals, capable of making their own choices in life"; pg. 15); Moral Education ("secular humanism is not such much a specific morality as it is a method for the explanation and discovery of rational moral principles"; pg. 17); Religious Skepticism ("traditional views of the existence of God either are meaningless, have not yet been demonstrated to be true, or are tyranically exploitative"; pg. 18); Reason ("We are committed to the uses of rational methods of inquiry, logic, and evidence in developing knowledge and testing claims to truth"; pg. 19); Science and Technology ("the scientific method, though imperfect, is still the most reliable way of understanding the world"; pg. 20); Evolution ("the evolution of the species is supported so strongly by the weight of evidence that it is difficult to reject it"; pg. 21); and Education ("Among its vital purposes should also be an attempt to develop the capacity for critical intelligence"; pg. 22).

They conclude on the note, "In a world engulfed by obscurantism and irrationalism it is vital that the ideals of the secular city not be lost." (Pg. 24)

Whether one agrees/disagrees with all/some/none of this document, it is a historically-important document for anyone studying the Humanist movement.