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Download Plato's Republic: A Vision of Truth, Justice and the Ideal Society (Sacred Wisdom) epub book
ISBN:190678745X
Author: Alan Jacobs
ISBN13: 978-1906787455
Title: Plato's Republic: A Vision of Truth, Justice and the Ideal Society (Sacred Wisdom)
Format: mbr lit doc lrf
ePUB size: 1665 kb
FB2 size: 1158 kb
DJVU size: 1815 kb
Language: English
Category: Philosophy
Publisher: Watkins (February 2, 2010)
Pages: 224

Plato's Republic: A Vision of Truth, Justice and the Ideal Society (Sacred Wisdom) by Alan Jacobs



P style MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt The Republic is considered Plato’s masterpiece-the culmination of his efforts to create a complete philosophy of man. In these provocative and enjoyable dialogues.

Alan Jacobs (Alan^^Jacobs) was born in 1929 in London. From an early age, he has been interested in religion and mysticism. He then entered the Gurdjieff Society in 1957 and remained there until the early seventies. He then met Jiddu Krishnamurti, and studied his teachings until 1979. Next, he discovered Ramana Maharshi and Alan Jacobs (Alan^^Jacobs) was born in 1929 in London.

The Republic is considered Plato’s masterpiece—the culmination of his efforts to create a complete philosophy of man. In these provocative and enjoyable dialogues, Socrates and various Athenian dignitaries discuss the true meaning of justice; debate “Whether the just man is happier than an unjust man ; and consider the nature of the ideal State. Library descriptions.

In the Republic Plato lays out his analogy between the city and the individual soul and identifies personal happiness with public justice. With reason as the highest value, and the philosopher king as the embodiment of reason in the city, Plato proposes a political state that, despite its ostensible argument for justice and the good, has been criticized as anti-democratic, anti-humanitarian,, and in short, totalitarian  . In Book I Plato lays open the issue of justice by asking Thrasymachus what the nature and quality of justice is and how it can be compared to that of injustice (1. 351a).

Plato 's ideal society is based on the concept of justice, namely, the natural division of labour. Words: 922 - Pages: 4. Plato 's Republic And The Political Justice With Individual Justice. the guardians are the rulers of the city. Wisdom, courage, temperance, and justice each have a certain place where they thrive. These virtues are rigid, applying only to the certain social groups Socrates dictates and therefore strictly relate to certain parts of the soul. Words: 1911 - Pages: 8. Essay Plato 's Republic, The Images Of Justice.

Plato’s conception of justice is informed by his conviction that everything in nature is part of a hierarchy, and that nature is ideally a vast harmony, a cosmic symphony, every species and every individual serving a purpose. In this vision, anarchy is the supreme vice, the most unnatural and unjust state of affairs. However, both his explicit definitions of justice and the deeper intuitions that inspire his definitions differ from ours. We conceive of justice as oriented around ideas of individual freedom and the priority of the individual over the community, and we consider it sometimes not only permissible but even meritorious to disobey the state’s laws if they violate certain intuitions about individual rights. According to Plato, the ideal person is a philosopher, since his wisdom means his soul is in complete harmony with itself.

Plato realized the importance of these myths and made sure the population in his ideal society is given a mythology to protect them, which is exemplified in the novel Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood. Join Now to View Premium Content.

Plato's ideal society consisted of a strict division of labor between the three classes: The Guardians or eens ruled the city. The Auxiliaries were the warriors who protected the city. This is laid out in Book II of the Republic. The guardians have to undergo an additional ten years of mathematical education (as described in Book VII of the Republic). Plato's ideal society is built on the ideal of justice. Just as he believed the soul was composed of three hierarchical parts-appetitive, rational, and spiritual-he believed a just society should be composed of three corresponding classes: the guardians (philosophers charged with governing the republic), the auxiliaries (soldiers who defend the republic), and the producers (farmers/craftsmen, et.

In Utopia, the influential 16th century vision of the ideal state, Thomas More incorporated Plato’s earlier negation of private property and the necessity for educated and qualified rulers. By the 18th century, French philosopher Emile Durkheim once again wrote of society as an organism requiring the integrated function of its parts in his The Division of Labor in Society. More recent history continues to show appropriation of Plato’s work, even though in very different forms

The Republic is considered Plato’s masterpiece—the culmination of his efforts to create a complete philosophy of man. In these provocative and enjoyable dialogues, Socrates and various Athenian dignitaries discuss the true meaning of justice; debate “Whether the just man is happier than an unjust man”; and consider the nature of the ideal State. This edition was abridged by Thomas Taylor, the greatest of the many translators to tackle this seminal work. 

Reviews: 3
Ance
Gracias!
Mala
Hi...As the title says, the cover is nice and looks great in the ad-until you get it. ...the book is very small and the print is tiny and hard to read. I'll know you'll ask if I checked the size in the description and I didn't, but I'm honestly tired of having to be suspicious of every transaction I make. Very disappointed.
Mr.Savik
I want to talk about the look and feel of this book: what a delight it is feast your eyes upon and within this this little abridged edition. How it feels to the hand, as you turn the pages! One comes to Plato with reverence anyway, but the feeling you get turning the pages of this little masterpiece is something special to experience. I will be using it this summer for my AP English Language and Composition students' summer reading assignment; and I can't think of another edition that is more welcoming to first-time (and experienced) readers of Plato. To those who know, some translations are stiff and literal to a fault. Some are virtually unreadable out loud. But this Alan Jacobs edition (an abridgement and modernization of the Thomas Taylor translation) calls to be read aloud, it is so easy on the ear and tongue.