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ISBN:9004094792
Author: Ninian Smart
ISBN13: 978-9004094796
Title: Doctrine and Argument in Indian Philosophy (Indian Thought and Culture)
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ePUB size: 1862 kb
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Language: English
Category: Philosophy
Publisher: Brill Academic Pub; Revised, Subsequent edition (August 1, 1997)
Pages: 277

Doctrine and Argument in Indian Philosophy (Indian Thought and Culture) by Ninian Smart



Belonged to: "Indian thought,, v. 4, Indian thought and culture ;, v. serie. This book describes the following items: Philosophy, Indic. More about the author(s): Ninian Smart was born in 1927. Download more by: Ninian Smart. Find and Load Ebook Doctrine and argument in Indian philosophy.

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Doctrine and argument in Indian philosophy. Indian Thought, Vol. pp. ix, 277. Leiden et. E. J. Brill, 1992. Full text views reflects the number of PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views. Total number of HTML views: 0. Total number of PDF views: 0 .

Indian philosophy refers to ancient philosophical traditions of the Indian subcontinent. The principal schools are classified as either orthodox or heterodox – āstika or nāstika – depending on one of three alternate criteria: whether it believes the Vedas as a valid source of knowledge; whether the school believes in the premises of Brahman and Atman; and whether the school believes in afterlife and Devas.

Indian philosophy: Indian philosophy, the systems of thought and reflection that were developed by the civilizations of the Indian subcontinent. They include both orthodox (astika) systems, namely, the Nyaya, Vaisheshika, Samkhya, Yoga, Purva-Mimamsa (or Mimamsa), and Vedanta schools of philosophy, and unorthodox. Forms of argument and presentation. There is, in relation to Western thought, a striking difference in the manner in which Indian philosophical thinking is presented as well as in the mode in which it historically develops.

Doctrine and argument in Indian philosophy. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Doctrine and argument in Indian philosophy. from your list? Doctrine and argument in Indian philosophy. Published 1964 by Allen and Unwin in London. Internet Archive Wishlist, Indic Philosophy, Philosophy and religion, India, Philosophy, Indic.

Epistemological thought varies in Indian philosophy according to how each system addresses the question of "Pramānas" or the "sources and proofs of knowledge. Mittal 41) The Lokāyata (Cārvāka) school recognized perception (pratkaysa) alone as a reliable source of knowledge. They therefore rejected two commonly held pramānas: 1) inference (anumana) and 2) testimony (sabda). Ethical practices and one's spiritual education in Indian culture are inextricably tied to one another. Those who identify with the Indian Materialist school are criticized by the prominent Indian philosophical schools of thought because they are viewed as largely ignorant of both metaphysical and moral truths. Doctrine and Argument in Indian Philosophy. London: Allen and Unwin, 1964. Vanamamalai, N. "Materialist Thought in Early Tamil Literature.

Series: Indian Thought, Volume: 4. Author: Smart. Part 1 discusses the metaphysical systems, Buddhist metaphysics, Jain metaphysics, materialism and exegesis, distinctionism and yoga, logic-atomism, non-dualism, qualified non-dualism, dualism and Śaivite doctrine, analysis of the religious factors in Indian metaphysics . Karel Werner, Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, 1994. students and scholars of Indian philosophy.

A revised and updated edition of Ninian Smart's well-known work, long out of print, this study provides a lucid and helpful introduction to the chief systems and debates found in Indian (Hindu, Buddhist, Jain etc.) traditions of philosophy. Part 1 discusses the metaphysical systems, Buddhist metaphysics, Jain metaphysics, materialism and exegesis, distinctionism and yoga, logic-atomism, non-dualism, qualified non-dualism, dualism and qaivite doctrine, analysis of the religious factors in Indian metaphysics. Part 2 examines arguments for and against the existence of God, arguments about rebirth and the soul, epistemological questions, causation, and induction and inference.