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ISBN:0887068596
Author: Richard R. Peterson
ISBN13: 978-0887068591
Title: Women, Work, and Divorce (SUNY series in the Sociology of Work and Organizations)
Format: txt lrf mobi mbr
ePUB size: 1328 kb
FB2 size: 1759 kb
DJVU size: 1882 kb
Language: English
Category: Family Relationships
Publisher: SUNY Press (March 9, 1989)
Pages: 179

Women, Work, and Divorce (SUNY series in the Sociology of Work and Organizations) by Richard R. Peterson



SUNY series in the Sociology of Work and Organizations. Release Date: March 1989. This book considers how women cope with the economic hardship which accompanies divorce, using national longitudinal data on a generation of women in the United States. These women came of age at a time when they were expected to give priority to family roles over work roles. 1. Women, Work, and Divorce. Introduction . The Effect of Divorce on Women's Economic Well-Being . The Effect of Divorce on Women's Position in the Labor Market . Models of Women's Labor Market Outcomes: Individualist Approaches . Models of Women's Labor Market Outcomes: Labor Market Segmentation Approaches . Overview of the Study. 2. Data and Measurement Issues.

Eviction and the Reproduction of Urban Poverty. On the Relation Between Sociology and Ethics. Racial Profiling and Use of Force in Police Stops: How Local Events Trigger Periods of Increased Discrimination. Accominotti et al. 1427 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637.

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But women’s economic independence from their husbands isn’t the only way that money, work, and divorce could be associated. Another possibility is that couples who have few financial resources are more likely to divorce, maybe because they argue more about how to spend those limited resources. Yet another possibility is that divorce is more likely when spouses don’t fulfill what’s socially expected of husbands or wives. Those expectations might include that the husband is employed full-time or that the wife takes primary responsibility for housework

Work, in sociology, is defined as the carrying out of tasks, which involves the expenditure of mental and physical effort, and its objective is the production of goods and services that cater to human needs. An occupation, or job, is work that is done in exchange for a regular wage or salary. In all cultures, work is the basis of the economy or economic system. Weber focused on the development of new types of authority that emerged in modern bureaucratic organizations. Many studies in the sociology of work are comparative. Why, for example, do Americans work on average more than 400 hours more per year than those in the Netherlands while South Koreans work more than 700 hours more per year than Americans?

Work has of course taken a wide array of institutional forms across different cultures and historical periods, ranging from forced or unfree labor (in prisons, slave systems, and other coercive contexts) to non-market work (subsistence farming or household labor) and wage labor or paid employment. The last of these has been viewed as the predominant form of production under modernity and has provided the central focus of the field. labor markets (whether within the firm or beyond its boundaries); and the relations between work organizations and their wider institutional environments. Sociologists of work and employment are most often found in academic departments of sociology, business schools, and governmental agencies concerned with equal employment opportunity. The sociology of work: Structures and inequalities. New York: Oxford Univ.

Free Sociology Books is a publisher of free Sociology Textbooks to help studetns fight the rising cost of College textbooks. Divorce is the legal dissolution of a previously granted marriage. To understand marriage and divorce trends in the . you should think in threes. In Figure 1 below you can see just how many legal marriages were granted per divorce for the years 2000-2011. These numbers are presented in a constant rate of events/1,000 population members. The highest rate of currently divorced people is also found among the women and men of the 50-59 cohort. The Baby Boomers 1946-1955 still hold the highest divorce rates of any cohort in . Their unprecedented high divorce rates raised the overall divorce rates for the entire nation and contributed in part to the myth of half of all marriages ending in divorce.

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Gender and women’s studies not only brings new perspectives to anthropology, history, sociology, literary analysis and other fields, but it also puts theory into practice. Gender and women’s studies students and faculty continue learning about the gendered worlds we live in and acting on issues of social justice. We help actively rethink women’s pasts, enact our ongoing struggles and envision possible futures. Gender & Women’s Studies Forum.

This book considers how women cope with the economic hardship which accompanies divorce, using national longitudinal data on a generation of women in the United States. These women came of age at a time when they were expected to give priority to family roles over work roles. Yet by the time many of them were divorced in the 1970s, with the climate of changing perceptions of gender roles, women were expected to work, and were unprepared for the economic disruption caused by divorce. Peterson analyzes the experiences of women drawing upon sociological and economic approaches to the study of labor market outcomes, and of life-cycle events. He shows how over the long term most divorced women can make at least a partial recovery, but divorced women with children have a more difficult time making work adjustments, and experience greater economic deprivation. Given the continuing high rates of divorce, Peterson’s findings highlight the importance of work rather than marriage for women’s economic security.