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Download Buddhism for Mothers of Schoolchildren: Finding Calm in the Chaos of the School Years epub book
ISBN:1458716805
Author: Sarah Napthali
ISBN13: 978-1458716804
Title: Buddhism for Mothers of Schoolchildren: Finding Calm in the Chaos of the School Years
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ePUB size: 1256 kb
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Language: English
Category: Family Relationships
Publisher: ReadHowYouWant; 16th ed. edition (December 28, 2012)
Pages: 340

Buddhism for Mothers of Schoolchildren: Finding Calm in the Chaos of the School Years by Sarah Napthali



Publishers Weekly on Buddhism for Mothers. The author guides busy women in the art of transforming their lives in the midst of chaos. Library Journal on Buddhism for Mothers. A lovely book for anyone that wants to become more present in their parenting. This is another beautiful, insightful, and gently guiding book from Sarah Napthali, this time for mothers of school-aged children. I am a fan of both her prior books in this 'series' - Buddhism for Mothers: A Calm Approach to Caring for Yourself and Your Children and Buddhism for Mothers of Young Children: Becoming a Mindful Parent. Ms. Napthali wrote the first when her children were still in the baby/toddler years, and so it is most helpful to parents with similarly-aged children (although really, many of the themes transcend age guidelines

Raising school children is a radically different experience from tending the under-fives. Sarah's first two books concentrated on the experience of mothers with young children, toddlers, and babies, and what mothers could learn from Buddhism to help them through this often desperate, tumultuous time. Now, with children at school, life is both easier and harder and there are very different challenges on the horizon†mothers are often thinking of going back to work, or juggling work/life balance issues  .

Sarah Napthali is a mother of two young boys who tries to apply Buddhist teachings in her daily life. Since becoming a mother she has focussed on writing, initially for companies and later for individuals wanting to record their memoirs. With seven memoirs compl Sarah Napthali is a mother of two young boys who tries to apply Buddhist teachings in her daily life. Books by Sarah Napthali.

Raising school children is a radically different experience from tending children under the age of five. With children at school, life is both easier and harder and there are very different challenges on the horizon-mothers are often thinking of going back to work, or juggling work–life balance issues. They are questioning what they want out of life, how they want to interact with the world, and creating new definitions for themselves.

This is the page of Sarah Napthali on 24symbols. Here you can see and read his/her books. More from this author. It is one of the most brilliant and beloved spiritual self-help works of all time which can help you heal yourself, banish your fears, sleep better, enjoy better relationships and just feel happier. The techniques are simple and results come quickly. You can improve your relationships, your finances, your physical well-being.

With her children at school, a mother is on to a new stage of her life, playing a new role. The daily challenges she confronts have changed, yet for each one Buddhist teachings of mindfulness, compassion and calm are invaluable.

Walmart 9781741756975. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. Buddhism for Mothers of Schoolchildren : Finding Calm in the Chaos of the School Years. Walmart 9781741756975. Book Format: Choose an option. Children are more demanding too, asking questions, testing boundaries, and beginning to define themselves as separate from their parents.

With her children at school, a mother is on to a new stage of her life, playing a new role. The daily challenges she confronts have changed, yet for each one Buddhist teachings of mindfulness, compassion and calm are invaluable. This book explores those teachings through many scenarios, including managing the stress of numerous deadlines, coping with routine and repetition, answering children's tricky questions about how the world works, fitting in with other parents, managing our fears and expectations for our children, and dealing with difficult behaviours in both children and adults. In her usual warm, wise, inclusive and accessible style, Sarah also suggests ways to share Buddhist teachings with children so they maintain a connection to their own inner wisdom rather than reacting to peers and the media. Within this book, mothers will find the inspiration to be more patient, loving and attentive towards their children, other family members, other parents, but most of all, themselves. WC Sarah Napthali is a mother of two young boys who strives to apply Buddhist teachings in her daily life. She is the author of Buddhism for Mothers, which has sold 60,000 copies around the world and been translated into nine languages to date, and Buddhism for Mothers of Young Children (formerly published under the title Buddhism for Mothers with Lingering Questions). Since the children started school, Sarah is very pleased to report that she manages to meditate (almost) daily.
Reviews: 7
Hudora
This is another beautiful, insightful, and gently guiding book from Sarah Napthali, this time for mothers of school-aged children. I am a fan of both her prior books in this 'series' - Buddhism for Mothers: A Calm Approach to Caring for Yourself and Your Children and Buddhism for Mothers of Young Children: Becoming a Mindful Parent. Ms. Napthali wrote the first when her children were still in the baby/toddler years, and so it is most helpful to parents with similarly-aged children (although really, many of the themes transcend age guidelines.) The second is really focused on mothers of toddlers and preschoolers. And this latest one is focused on mothers of school-aged children.

Ms. Napthali is a practicing Buddhist, and her approach is to take Buddhist themes and teachings, and demonstrate their relevance to the daily lives of mothers, through examples drawn from her own life and anecdotes from the lives of other mothers she knows. Mindfulness, being fully present for our children, is a constant theme of all her books, as well as self-care and getting to the roots of any needless or harmful judgments we engage in - of either our own parenting, others, or our children. She draws on passages and themes that are universal to all Buddhist lineages - Zen, Tibetan, and Theravada.

That being said, this book - and all of them - are NOT just for practicing Buddhists. I gave the earlier books to other mothers I knew that do not consider themselves Buddhist, and don't even really have any knowledge of Buddhist teachings, and they found them so valuable. And they are not just for mothers either - my husband is now reading this one. Finally, this particular book is not just for parents with children in school - I think 'school-aged children' is perhaps a better title, because most of the themes are applicable to anyone with children this age, whether homeschooling or in school.

Chapters I found of particular value in this book were:

- Socialising: Working through issues with other mothers, with changing dynamics between mothers, with the tendency to gossip, with problems between children of friends etc., with compassion and a clear understanding of our boundaries.

- Explaining: Ideas and anecdotes on how to model and develop an open mind in our children when it comes to religion, politics, and any views that may differ from our own, while at the same time letting our children know what our own views are (in keeping with Buddhist teachings on not becoming fixated.)

- Sharing: How, how much, and when to share aspects of our spiritual views and practice, including some lovely guided meditations suitable for children this age.

Ms. Napthali is very generous with her own stories, and brings in many from other mothers that she knows as well. It is like reading a book by a friend. Highly recommend!
Peras
Again, not a Buddhist, but the issues (competition, stress, fear, guilt, over-protectiveness, pressure to achieve/succeed, scarcity, depression, sex, drugs, etc.) she acknowledges in this book hit home as the most common and most challenging for me as a mom and a person. The ideas and strategies she presents to help moms and kids navigate these dynamic and potentially difficult but very important formative years are actually pretty common-sense but can be elusive (I've found) in the context of certain aspects of today's mainstream culture. I liked how she broke common life/parenting problems down and offered really simple, wise ways to think and talk to our kids to help and encourage and empower them, and ourselves, to live more mindfully in that, to be less stressed, safer and happier.
Flas
While I still love Buddhism for Mothers of Young Children the best, this is a good follow up. I read these books slowly, taking time to really digest various points in the book. The author helps assure a reader that you are not alone! All of your feelings are shared by others and here is an approach to help you care for yourself (something we mothers seem to neglect doing).
Burirus
I love all of Sarah Napthali's books, but this is my favorite! Warm, wise, and so helpful. After reading the 1st chapter alone I feel my perspective shifting, and day to day life with kids becoming easier. Highly recommend.
Ericaz
My wife and i love this book .
Funny duck
Sometimes home life with children can be chaos. I was looking for a book to help keep me leveled with good advice. I think this book was meant for mother's, but has advice father's can use too. I would recommend this book to any parent.
Sharpbringer
Always light & funny as well as giving great insight into keeping yourself mindful and realising the wonderful gifts in your life each day.
Often you think you are all alone, and then you read a great book and realise that there are people that wonder about things like you do - thank you for sharing Sarah!