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ISBN:1585441422
Author: Constantine J. Spiliotes
ISBN13: 978-1585441426
Title: VICIOUS CYCLE: Presidential Decision Making in the American Political Economy (Joseph V. Hughes Jr. and Holly O. Hughes Series in the Presidency and Learning Studies (Hardcover))
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ePUB size: 1267 kb
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Language: English
Category: Social Sciences
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press (December 3, 2001)
Pages: 232

VICIOUS CYCLE: Presidential Decision Making in the American Political Economy (Joseph V. Hughes Jr. and Holly O. Hughes Series in the Presidency and Learning Studies (Hardcover)) by Constantine J. Spiliotes



Joseph V. Hughes, J. and Holly O. Hughes series in the presidency and leadership studies ; no. 9. Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references (p. 195-205) and index. Geographic Name: United States fast (OCoLC)fst01204155. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Vicious cycle : presidential decision making in the American political economy, Constantine J. Spiliotes.

Vicious Cycle: Presidential Decision Making in the American Political Economy (Presidency and Leadership Studies, 9). Constantine J. Download (pdf, . 3 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Constantine J. Spiliotes makes a substantial new contribution to the literature on presidential decision making. Spiliotes seeks to bring together two largely separate literatures: presidential studies and rational choice theory. This is a formidable task: Economists and rational-choice political scientists typically view traditional presidential studies as excessively anecdotal for the purpose. The majority party helps structure this critical process in both chambers, though party effects appear stronger in the House. Contrary to recent work on the rise of Senate individualism, the seniority of the sponsor has significant effects in both the Senate and House, but again exhibits a stronger effect in the House. Surprisingly, presidential proposals are no more likely to survive than typical bills.

Using Richard Neustadt’s analytical framework of presidential power, Nigel Bowles develops five case studies around President Nixon’s economic policies. The thoughtful, insightful analysis goes far to help us understand the sources of Richard Nixon’s authority and power, and his use of both. For each of the “issue-stories (as Bowles terms them), he considers the president’s bargaining advantages: his authority (constitutional and statutory), popular prestige, and personal qualities. Nixon’s Business is the first book to make systematic use of Neustadt’s crucial framework in understanding a specific presidency; the first to analyze empirically the components of Nixon’s authority and power; and the first to demonstrate the implications of both for understanding the institution of the United States presidency.

a major contribution to the literature of presidential decision making. John Burke has written a book that all students of the presidency will want to absorb. He has written seven books and is a former winner of the American Political Science Association’s Richard Neustadt Award for the best book on the American Presidency. is from Princeton University. Series: Joseph V. Hughes Jr. Hughes Series on the Presidency and Leadership. Paperback: 504 pages.

In six case studies he then analyzes the implications of certain pivotal changes in the advisor’s role, providing thoughtful and sometimes critical reflections on how these changes square with the role of honest broker. Finally, Burke offers some prescriptive consideration of how the definition of the national security advisor’s role relates to effective presidential decision making and the crucial issues of American national security. Honest Broker? will be an important resource for scholars, students, political leaders, and general readers interested in the .

Export citation Request permission. 2003 by the American Political Science Association. Recommend this journal.

Presidential decision making on the economy, therefore, does have an institutional dimension. But we knew this already. Everything else Spiliotes presents is interesting and compelling, but his book breaks theoretical ground only in its criticism of extant models. There’s just too much partisan and historical variance in the data, however,. Vicious Cycle deserves shelf space in the library of every scholar of economic policy and the American presidency. North Carolina State University.

American presidents enter office ready to enact a policy-making agenda that will satisfy partisan interests and facilitate reelection to a second term. Economic circumstances, however, may catch presidents in a vicious cycle of economic growth and inflation versus recession and unemployment. Faced with a public that assigns to the chief executive responsibility for the nation's economic health, presidents are often forced by the dynamics of this cycle to make tradeoffs between pursuit of political objectives and stabilization of the economy. Vicious Cycle: Presidential Decision Making in the American Political Economy examines the strategic calculus that drives presidential acceptance of these decision-making tradeoffs. It provides a theoretical framework for explaining how presidents pursue partisan and electoral objectives in office, while simultaneously managing the nation's economy within the constraints of a complex institutional environment. With an approach that bridges several literatures in presidential studies and political economy, Constantine J. Spiliotes develops an econometric model of postwar presidential decision making in the American political economy and employs its insights to explicate the empirical dynamics of economic decision making in four presidencies. The extensively documented studies—Presidents Eisenhower, Johnson, Carter, and Reagan—offer variation across several analytic dimensions: temporal, partisan, electoral, and institutional. Spiliotes concludes that presidential acceptance of decision-making tradeoffs between the pursuit of political objectives and the imperatives of institutional responsibility is driven by a transformation in the nature of the American presidency, from an office in which decision making is anchored in partisan accountability to one in which decision making is constrained by the chief executive's institutional mission. Spiliotes's work will contribute to a fuller understanding of the presidency, political economy, and the methodologies that elucidate them.