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ISBN:1919895272
Author: Dr. Fiona Ross
ISBN13: 978-1919895277
Title: Raw Life, New Hope: Decency, Housing and Everyday Life in a Post-apartheid Community
Format: mbr docx lrf mobi
ePUB size: 1673 kb
FB2 size: 1251 kb
DJVU size: 1879 kb
Language: English
Category: Social Sciences
Publisher: University of Cape Town Press (January 1, 2010)
Pages: 256

Raw Life, New Hope: Decency, Housing and Everyday Life in a Post-apartheid Community by Dr. Fiona Ross



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Read eBook on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. This is the story of a shantytown community in South Africa and its efforts to secure a decent life, moving from tin shacks to formal housing, in postapartheid South Africa. The author's 17-year longitudinal study of this community has resulted in an extraordinary work that brings its people alive, through photographs, interviews, and even recipes. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Publisher: University of Cape Town PressReleased: Jan 1, 2010ISBN: 9781919895673Format: book.

Home All Categories Politics & Social Sciences Books Ethnic Studies Books Raw Life, New Hope: Decency, Housing and Everyday Life in a Post-Apartheid Community. ISBN13: 9781919895277. Raw Life, New Hope : Decency, Housing and Everyday Life in a Post-Apartheid Community. Select Format: Paperback. Select Condition: Like New. - Very Good. The Cape Flats, that windswept, treeless, barren, sandy area between two oceans at Africa's southern tip, is home to more than a million people, approximately one quarter of Cape Town's population. This ethnography includes studies of the lives, aspirations and coping strategies of people in impoverished circumstances in South Africa.

Raw Life, New Hope: Housing, Decency and Everyday Life in a Post-apartheid Community. Centred on people's move from shacks to a residential estate, Raw Life New Hope traces the conditions of possibility of everyday life in South Africa's post-apartheid context. Understanding poverty and marginality as a form of exposure to what I call 'raw life', the book describes contexts in which one might be disenfranchised from living in accord with ideals, or indeed, from life itself. It traces the complex ways that structural violence and social possibility fold into the making of everyday worlds.

Preface; 'Teen die pad, Die Bos' (Alongside the road, The Bush); 'I Long to Live in a House'; Sense-scapes: Senses & emotion in the making of place; Relationships that count & how to count them; 'Just working for food': making a living, making do & getting by; Truth, lies, stories & straight-talk: on addressing another; Illness & accompaniment; Conclusion: Raw life, new hope?; Endnotes; Glossary of select Afrikaans terms; References; Index.

Raw Life, New Hope: Decency, Housing and Everyday Life in a Post-apartheid Community. January 1st 2010 by University of Cape Town Press.

Publisher: UCT Press. Print ISBN: 9781919895277, 1919895272. Reflowable eTextbooks do not maintain the layout of a traditional bound book. Reflowable eTextbooks may also contain embedded audio, video, or interactive components in addition to Bookshelf's standard study tools.

The Cape Flats, a windswept, barren and sandy area which rings Cape Town, is home to more than a million people. Many live here in sprawling shack settlements. The post-apartheid state is attempting to eradicate such settlements by providing formal houses in planned residential estates. Raw Life, New Hope is a longitudinal study of the residents of one such shack settlement, The Park, who moved to new, 'formal' houses in The Village, at the turn of the millennium. It introduces readers to core social science topics and modes of theorising. Over 17 years the author has.

This is the story of a shantytown community in South Africa and its efforts to secure a decent life, moving from tin shacks to formal housing, in postapartheid South Africa. The author's 17-year longitudinal study of this community has resulted in an extraordinary work that brings its people alive, through photographs, interviews, and even recipes.