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ISBN:0415495458
Author: Bulent Diken
ISBN13: 978-0415495455
Title: Revolt, Revolution, Critique: The Paradox of Society (International Library of Sociology)
Format: docx mobi mbr doc
ePUB size: 1926 kb
FB2 size: 1307 kb
DJVU size: 1384 kb
Language: English
Category: Social Sciences
Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (January 28, 2012)
Pages: 216

Revolt, Revolution, Critique: The Paradox of Society (International Library of Sociology) by Bulent Diken



Book Condition: Book is in overall good condition!! Cover shows some edge wear and corners are lightly worn. Pages have a minimal to moderate amount of markings. Fast shipping w/USPS tracking!!! In Stock. Bülent Diken is Senior Lecturer at Lancaster University, Department of Sociology. His books include Strangers, Ambivalence and Social Theory (Ashgate 1998). He is author of The Culture of Exception – Sociology Facing the Camp (Routledge 2005), I Terrorens Skygge (Samfundslitteratur 2005), Sociology through the Projector (Routledge 2007) and Nihilism (Routledge 2009). Series: International Library of Sociology.

Part of the International Library of Sociology series. In contemporary society the idea of 'revolution' seems to have become obsolete. What is more untimely than the idea of revolution today? At the same time, however, the idea of radical change no longer refers to exceptional circumstances but has become normalized as part of daily life. Ours is a 'culture' of permanent revolution in which constant systemic disembedding demands a meta-stable subjectivity in continuous transformation. Further, since both revolt and revolution involve the critique of what exists, of actual reality, the implications of the intimate relationship between revolt, revolution and critique are explicated.

In contemporary society the idea of 'revolution' seems to have become obsolete  . The book addresses the social, political and cultural significance of revolt and revolution in three dimensions. First, it analyzes revolt and revolution as 'events' which are of history but not reducible to it. Second, it elaborates on theories that grant revolt and revolution a central place in their structure. Ayrıca, The Culture of Exception (Routledge, 2005) ve Sociology through the Projector (Routledge, 2007) adlı kitapların eş-yaza Lancaster Üniversitesi, Sosyoloji Bölümü’nde öğretim üyesidir. Toplumsal teori, sosyal felsefe, terörizm, sinema, kentlilik ve göç konularında araştırmalar yürütmektedir. Strangers, Ambivalence and Social Theory (Ashgate, 1998) adında yayımlanmış bir kitabı bulunmaktadır.

Series Statement: International library of sociology. Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references (p. -196) and index. Summary, et. "In contemporary society the idea of revolution seems to have become obsolete. Further, since both revolt and revolution involve the critique of what exists, of actual reality, the implications of the intimate relationship between revolt, revolution and critique are explicated", Provided by publisher. "In contemporary society the idea of 'revolution' seems to have become obsolete. What is more untimely than the idea of revolution today?

The International Library of Sociology (ILS) is the most important series of books on sociology ever published.

Read "Revolt, Revolution, Critique The Paradox of Society" by Bulent Diken with Rakuten Kobo. In contemporary society the idea of ‘revolution’ seems to have become obsolete  . Revolt, Revolution, Critique. The Paradox of Society. series International Library of Sociology. First, it analyzes revolt and revolution as ‘events’ which are of history but not reducible to it. Thirdly, it discusses revolutionary or emancipatory theories that seek to participate in radical change.

The Paradox of Society. Author: Bulent Diken. Publisher: Routledge.

The book addresses the social, political and cultural significance of revolt and revolution in three dimensions.

Revolt, Revolution, Critique: The Paradox of Society (International Library of Sociology): ISBN 9780415495455 (978-0-415-49545-5) Softcover, Routledge, 2012. Sociology through the Projector (International Library of Sociology). ISBN 9780415445986 (978-0-415-44598-6) Softcover, Routledge, 2007. Sociology through the Projector (International Library of Sociology): ISBN 9780415445986 (978-0-415-44598-6) Softcover, Routledge, 2007.

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In contemporary society the idea of ‘revolution’ seems to have become obsolete. What is more untimely than the idea of revolution today? At the same time, however, the idea of radical change no longer refers to exceptional circumstances but has become normalized as part of daily life. Ours is a ‘culture’ of permanent revolution in which constant systemic disembedding demands a meta-stable subjectivity in continuous transformation. In this sense, the idea of revolution is painfully timely. This paradoxical coincidence, the simultaneous absence and presence of the desire for radical change in contemporary society, is the point of departure for the symptomatic reading this book offers.

The book addresses the social, political and cultural significance of revolt and revolution in three dimensions. First, it analyzes revolt and revolution as ‘events’ which are of history but not reducible to it. Second, it elaborates on theories that grant revolt and revolution a central place in their structure. Thirdly, it discusses revolutionary or emancipatory theories that seek to participate in radical change. Further, since both revolt and revolution involve the critique of what exists, of actual reality, the implications of the intimate relationship between revolt, revolution and critique are explicated.