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ISBN:0691124272
Author: Peter D. Feaver,Christopher Gelpi
ISBN13: 978-0691124278
Title: Choosing Your Battles: American Civil-Military Relations and the Use of Force
Format: lrf rtf azw lit
ePUB size: 1922 kb
FB2 size: 1421 kb
DJVU size: 1888 kb
Language: English
Category: Social Sciences
Publisher: Princeton University Press; New Ed edition (September 11, 2005)
Pages: 248

Choosing Your Battles: American Civil-Military Relations and the Use of Force by Peter D. Feaver,Christopher Gelpi



Feaver and Gelpi offer important insights into the character of civil-military relations in the . and into its effects on the nature of . n important work whose findings have wide-ranging policy implications. Feaver and Gelpi's intriguing and well-executed study provides a welcome contribution to scholarship in this area. Peter Feaver and Christopher Gelpi have combined qualitative and quantitative analyses to produce a major piece of scholarship on a subject of great importance. -John Allen Williams, Loyola University Chicago, author of Soldiers, Society, and National Security.

Choosing your battles. American civil-military relations and the use of force. With a new afterword by the authors. Peter D. Feaver and Christopher Gelpi. Princeton university press princeton and oxford. The use of force, peter D. P. CM. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 0-691-11584-2 (alk. Paper). 1. civil-military relations-united states. 2. war and emergency powers-united states.

Whenever American leaders decide to use military force, there is usually a great debate within elite leadership circles over how to use that force. One school of thought prefers liberal engagement of the military through a wide range of civil/military operations and with varying degrees of restrictions on the use of that force. Their analysis thoroughly explores civil-military operations within elite leadership circles to determine answers to the questions of when and how America will use force. Perhaps the most important aspect of this book is that Feaver and Gelpi work hard to dispel the casualty-phobia myth.

Choosing Your Battles: American Civil-Military Relations and the Use of Force CHOOSING YOUR BATTLES: AMERICAN CIVIL-MILITARY RELATIONS AND THE USE OF FORCE BY Feaver, Peter D. ( Author ) Aug-22-2005 CHOOSING YOUR BATTLES: AMERICAN CIVIL-MILITARY. FHM0S/?tag prabook0b-20. By Peter D. Feaver - Armed Servants: Agency, Oversight, and Civil-Military Relations (2005-03-30) Paperback. Indeed, the underlying pattern has shaped . foreign policy at least since 1816. The new afterword by Peter Feaver and Christopher Gelpi traces these themes through the first two years of the current Iraq war, showing how civil-military debates and concerns about sensitivity to casualties continue to shape American foreign policy in profound ways. 24272/?tag prabook0b-20.

Personal Name: Feaver, Peter (DE-576)168547767. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Choosing your battles : American civil-military relations and the use of force, Peter D. Feaver and Christopher Gelpi online for free.

Feaver and Gelpi clearly set out the results of a widely cited study on the differing attitudes of military and civilian elites toward war. The study, conducted in 1998 and 1999 by the Triangle Institute for Security Studies, disproves glib assumptions about how the public views military operations and military casualties. Choosing Your Battles: American Civil-Military Relations and the Use of Force. Lawrence D. Freedman.

America's debate over whether and how to invade Iraq clustered into civilian versus military camps. Top military officials appeared reluctant to use force, the most hawkish voices in government were civilians who had not served in uniform, and everyone was worried that the American public would not tolerate casualties in war. This book shows that this civilian-military argument--which has characterized earlier debates over Bosnia, Somalia, and Kosovo--is typical, not exceptional. Indeed, the underlying pattern has shaped U.S. foreign policy at least since 1816. The new afterword by Peter Feaver and Christopher Gelpi traces these themes through the first two years of the current Iraq war, showing how civil-military debates and concerns about sensitivity to casualties continue to shape American foreign policy in profound ways.