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ISBN:0815703031
Author: Robert E. Lang,Jennifer B. LeFurgy
ISBN13: 978-0815703037
Title: Boomburbs: The Rise of America's Accidental Cities (James A. Johnson Metro Series)
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ePUB size: 1395 kb
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Language: English
Category: Social Sciences
Publisher: Brookings Institution Press (July 24, 2009)
Pages: 212

Boomburbs: The Rise of America's Accidental Cities (James A. Johnson Metro Series) by Robert E. Lang,Jennifer B. LeFurgy



These 'accidental cities' that Lang and LeFurgy call 'boomburbs' not only challenge our traditional concept of the urban; the fate of the boomburbs will increasingly determine the future of metropolitan America. Robert Fishman, Taubman College of Architecture and Planning, University of Michigan.

Here, Robert E. Lang and Jennifer B. LeFurgy explain who lives in them, what they look like, how they are governed, and why their rise calls into question the definition of urban. Some are now more populated than traditional big cities. The population of the biggest boomburb-Mesa, Arizona-recently surpassed that of Minneapolis and Miami

Series: James A. Johnson Metro Series. Published by: Brookings Institution Press. Book Description: A glance at a list of America's fastest growing "cities" reveals quite a surprise: most are really overgrown suburbs.

Personal Name: Lang, Robert, 1959-. Publication, Distribution, et. Washington, . Brookings Institution Press, (c)2007. Legoland From settlements to super suburbs Who live in the boomburbs? The business of boomburbs Big skies, small lots : boomburb housing and master-planned development The small town politics of big cities Boomburbs at buildout Emerging urban realms and the boomburbs of 2030. Summary, et. "Addresses the issue of 'boomburbs,' large suburbs of more than 100,000 residents, and examines who lives in them, what drives their development, and how they are governed. The population of the biggest boomburb-Mesa, Arizona-recently surpassed that of Minneapolis and Miami.

By bringing fresh analyses and policy ideas to the public debate, the program hopes to inform key decisionmakers and civic leaders in ways that will spur meaningful change in our nation's communities. p. cm. Summary: "Addresses the issue of ‘boomburbs,’ large suburbs of more than 100,000 residents, and examines who lives in them, what drives their development, and how they are governed.

Boomburbs: The Rise of America's Accidental Cities (James A. Johnson Metro Series): ISBN 9780815703037 (978-0-8157-0303-7) Softcover, Brookings Institution Press, 2009. Founded in 1997, BookFinder. Coauthors & Alternates.

America's Accidental. Brookings Institution.

Boomburbs: The Rise of America's Accidental Cities. Edgeless Cities: Exploring the Elusive Metropolis (Brookings Metro Series). Origami Diagramming Convention - Historical Perspective.

A glance at a list of America's fastest growing "cities" reveals quite a surprise: most are really overgrown suburbs. Places such as Anaheim, California, Coral Springs, Florida, Naperville, Illinois, North Las Vegas, Nevada, and Plano, Texas, have swelled to big-city size with few people really noticing—including many of their ten million residents. These "boomburbs" are large, rapidly growing, incorporated communities of more than 100,000 residents that are not the biggest city in their region. Here, Robert E. Lang and Jennifer B. LeFurgy explain who lives in them, what they look like, how they are governed, and why their rise calls into question the definition of urban.

Located in over twenty-five major metro areas throughout the United States, numerous boomburbs have doubled, tripled, even quadrupled in size between census reports. Some are now more populated than traditional big cities. The population of the biggest boomburb—Mesa, Arizona—recently surpassed that of Minneapolis and Miami.

Typically large and sprawling, boomburbs are "accidental cities," but not because they lack planning. Many are made up of master-planned communities that have grown into one another. Few anticipated becoming big cities and unintentionally arrived at their status. Although boomburbs possess elements found in cities such as housing, retailing, offices, and entertainment, they lack large downtowns. But they can contain high-profile industries and entertainment venues: the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim and Arizona Cardinals are among over a dozen major-league sports teams who play in the boomburbs.

Urban in fact but not in feel, these drive-by cities of highways, office parks, and shopping malls are much more horizontally built and less pedestrian friendly than most older suburbs. And, contrary to common perceptions of suburbia, they are not rich and elitist. Poverty is often seen in boomburb communities of small single-family homes, neighborhoods that once represented the American dream.

Boomburbs are a quintessential American landscape, embodying much of the nation's complexity, expansiveness, and ambiguity. This fascinating look at the often contradictory world of boomburbs examines why America's suburbs are thriving and how they are shaping the lives of millions of residents.