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ISBN:0335205488
Author: Sheila Brown
ISBN13: 978-0335205486
Title: Crime and Law in Media Culture
Format: lrf doc docx mobi
ePUB size: 1440 kb
FB2 size: 1395 kb
DJVU size: 1954 kb
Language: English
Category: Social Sciences
Publisher: Open University Press; 1 edition (April 2003)
Pages: 192

Crime and Law in Media Culture by Sheila Brown



Brown, Sheila, 1959-. Publication, Distribution, et. Buckingham ; Philadelphia On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Crime and law in media culture, Sheila Brown online for free.

This book explores the situating of law and crime within the vast range and scope of contemporary media forms. It begins from the premise that the whole of society, including crime and criminal justice, is embraced by media culture. The media' are viewed not as a set of institutions, but as a myriad of communicative forms or expressive techniques ranging from soaps to cyberworlds. Sheila Brown shows how crime and the law, or our understanding of them, are produced, reproduced, disturbed, and challenged in and through media culture

Sheila Brown investigates this question and takes the view that the whole of society, including crime and criminal justice, is embraced by media culture. The media' are not just a set of institutions, but constitute a way of existence that defines crime and legal forms. In short, the book sets out to assess how crime and the law, and our understanding of them, are produced and reproduced, disturbed, challenged and changed through media culture. The author organizes her inquiry around substantive topic areas set within a theoretical framework.

Sheila Brown is Lecturer in Criminology at the Faculty of Law, University of Sheffield and has lectured in sociology and criminology since 1989. Travels through the .

Sheila Brown shows how crime and the law, or our understanding of them, are produced, reproduced, disturbed, and challenged in and through media culture.

Her previous books include Crime and Law in Media Culture Open University Press (2003).

It is excellent not only in its analysis of criminological questions about youthful offending, but also because it positions the debate within a wider context of the relationship between young people and society' - ''Young People Now''. The importance of media representations of race and gender in these processes are also explored.

Select Format: Hardcover. This book explores the situating of law and crime within the vast range and scope of contemporary media forms.

Publication info: Buckingham ; Philadelphia : Open University Press, 2003. Crime, the media, and the law, Dennis Howitt. Media and crime, Yvonne Jewkes.

* Can we any longer 'separate out' crime, the law, and the media? * What does contemporary media culture do to our understanding of crime and the law? * What is the impact of cyberculture on crime and the law? This book explores the situating of law and crime within the vast range and scope of contemporary media forms. It begins from the premise that the whole of society, including crime and criminal justice, is embraced by media culture. 'The media' are viewed not as a set of institutions, but as a myriad of communicative forms or expressive techniques ranging from soaps to cyberworlds. Sheila Brown shows how crime and the law, or our understanding of them, are produced, reproduced, disturbed, and challenged in and through media culture. A lively and engaging text, this book contains a wide range of topical examples and provides a theoretically coherent examination of the field, providing an accessible critique of cultural theory along the way. It opens up the boundaries between the more traditional aspects of law and criminology, and the broader concerns of sociology and cultural studies. The result will be essential reading for students and a key reference for researchers as well as those with a wider interest in crime and the media.