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ISBN:0521168716
Author: Christian Davenport
ISBN13: 978-0521168717
Title: State Repression and the Domestic Democratic Peace (Cambridge Studies in Comparative Politics)
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Language: English
Category: Social Sciences
Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (September 9, 2010)
Pages: 254

State Repression and the Domestic Democratic Peace (Cambridge Studies in Comparative Politics) by Christian Davenport



Specifically, it finds that electoral participation and competition generally reduces personal integrity violations like torture and mass killing; other aspects of democracy do not wield consistent influences. This negative influence can be overwhelmed by conflict, however, and thus there are important.

Christian Davenport's book provides a valuable and nuanced understanding of how democracy affects domestic repression. What are the limitations of this argument? Investigating 137 countries from 1976 to 1996, State Repression and the Domestic Democratic Peace seeks to shed light on these questions. Series: Cambridge Studies in Comparative Politics.

State Repression and the Domestic Democratic Peace (Cambridge University Press – Cambridge Studies in Comparative Politics; 2007). 3. Ethnic Politics and Conflict/Violence (with Erika Forsberg and Johanna Birnir).

State Repression and the Domestic Democratic Peace (Cambridge, 2007). Repression and Mobilization (Minnesota, 2005). Paths to State Repression: Human Rights Violations and Contentious Politics (Roman and Littlefield, 2000). 26. State Repression and the Tyrannical Peace. 25. Licensing Repression: Dissent, Threats and State Repression in the United States. University of Minnesota Law Journal.

179 results in Cambridge Studies in Comparative Politics. Relevance Title Sorted by Date. After focusing on the contemporary causes of homicidal violence, the book analyzes the comparative historical origins of weak and complicit public security forces and the rare moments in which successful institutional reform takes place. Regional trends in Latin America are evaluated, followed by original case studies of Central America, which claims among the highest homicide rates in the world.

by Christian Davenport. Part of the Cambridge Studies in Comparative Politics series. Does democracy decrease state repression in line with the expectations of governments, international organizations, NGOs, social movements, academics and ordinary citizens around the world? Most believe that a 'domestic democratic peace' exists, rivalling that found in the realm of interstate conflict. Investigating 137 countries from 1976 to 1996, this book seeks to shed light on this question. Specifically, three results emerge

The End of Class Politics?: Class Voting in Comparative Context. This page intentionally left blank Nationalist Mobilization and the Collapse of the Soviet State This study examines. Reconstructing the State: Personal Networks and Elite Identity in Soviet Russia (Cambridge Studies in Comparative Politics) . Report "The Puzzle of Strikes: Class and State Strategies in Postwar Italy (Cambridge Studies in Comparative Politics)".

Does democracy decrease state repression in line with the expectations of governments, international organizations, NGOs, social movements, academics and ordinary citizens around the world? Most believe that a 'domestic democratic peace' exists, rivalling that found in the realm of interstate conflict. Specifically, three results emerge. First, while different aspects of democracy decrease repressive behaviour, not all do so to the same degree.

Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007. 1 Arguably the most solid empirical finding in international relations is that democracies do not go to war with each other. Christian Davenport warns us not to be too quick to judgment in his new book, State Repression and the Domestic Democratic Peace: the evidence may not be as simple as it may seem.

Does democracy reduce state repression as human rights activism, funding, and policy suggest? What are the limitations of this argument? Investigating 137 countries from 1976 to 1996, State Repression and the Domestic Democratic Peace seeks to shed light on these questions. Specifically, it finds that electoral participation and competition generally reduces personal integrity violations like torture and mass killing; other aspects of democracy do not wield consistent influences. This negative influence can be overwhelmed by conflict, however, and thus there are important qualifications for the peace proposition.