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ISBN:0813529352
Author: Lawrence Rothfield
ISBN13: 978-0813529356
Title: Unsettling 'Sensation': Arts-Policy Lessons from the Brooklyn Museum of Art Controversy (The Public Life of the Arts Series)
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Language: English
Category: Social Sciences
Publisher: Rutgers University Press; None ed. edition (June 1, 2001)
Pages: 256

Unsettling 'Sensation': Arts-Policy Lessons from the Brooklyn Museum of Art Controversy (The Public Life of the Arts Series) by Lawrence Rothfield



Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. This collection of cutting-edge art from the Saatchi collection in England, and the museum's arrangements with Charles Saatchi to finance the show, so offended New York City mayor Rudolph Giuliani that he attempted to shut the museum down by withholding city funds that are crucially needed by that institution. Only a legal ruling prevented him from doing so.

Rutgers series on the public life of the arts. General Note: Essays based on the conference "Taking Funds, Giving Offense, Making Money," held Feb. 12, 2000, at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references and index. Corporate Name: Brooklyn Museum of Art. Geographic Name: United States Cultural policy. by Charlotte Templin. ISBN: 0700607080 (cloth : alk. paper) Author: Templin, Charlotte. Publication & Distribution: Lawrence, Ka. .University Press of Kansas, (c)1995. Author: Jong, Erica Criticism and interpretation History. Successful negotiating : the essential guide to thinking and working smarter Julia Tipler. ISBN: 0814470661 Author: Tipler, Julia, 1951- Publication & Distribution: New York.

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Olivia said: The essays varied quite a bit in topic and readability. In September 1999, Sensation, an exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum, opened its doors, igniting a controversy still burning in the art world. This collection of cutting-edge art from the Saatchi collection in England, and the museum’s arrangements with Charles Saatchi to finance the show, so offended New York City mayor Rudolph Giuliani that he attempted to shut the museum In September 1999, Sensation, an exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum, opened its doors, igniting a controversy still burning in the art world.

This collection of cutting-edge art from the Saatchi collection in England, and the museum's arrangements with Charles Saatchi to finance the show, so offended New York City mayor Rudolph Giuliani that he attempted to shut the museum down by withholding city funds that are crucially needed by that institution

For art critic Nicola Kuhn from Der Tagesspiegel, there was "no sensation about Sensation". She claimed that the Berlin audience found the yBa's work "more sad and serious than irreverent, funny and dazzling". The exhibition was shown in New York City at the Brooklyn Museum from 2 October 1999 to 9 January 2000. The New York City show was met with instant protest, centring on The Holy Virgin Mary by Chris Ofili, which had not provoked this reaction in London. Rothfield, Lawrence (ed). Unsettling 'Sensation': Arts-Policy from the Brooklyn Museum of Art Controversy. Rutgers University Press, 2001. Stallabrass, Julian, High Art Lite: British Art in the 1990s.

Brooklyn Museum of Art. 1999. Sensation: Young British Artists from the Saatchi Collection. Press Release, April 8, 1999. In Unsettling Sensation: Arts Policy Lessons from the Brooklyn Museum of Art Controversy, ed. Lawrence Rothfield, 162–170. New Brunswick/London: Rutgers University Press.

Unsettling "Sensation": Arts-Policy Lessons from the Brooklyn Museum of Art Controversy. Rothfield, Lawrence, ed. 2001. unsettling "Sensation": arts-policy lessons from the brooklyn museum of art controversy. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press. While the public is strongly supportive of current levels of freedom of expression in the abstract, findings from the State of the First Amendment 2004 survey show that significant numbers of Americans (in some cases, a majority) would impose restrictions on particular forms of expression more Other Data Sets of Interest. State of the First Amendment. The State of the First Amendment survey collects data on Americans' attitudes towards First Amendment issues, including freedom of expression and tolerance for art that may be offensive to others.

Lawrence Rothfield, New Brunswick – London, 2001, 104-114. Read also the response of the exhibition‟s two curators, William Rubin and Kirk Varnedoe, as well as Thomas McEvilley‟s riposte, which are found in the February 1985 issue of Artforum (vol. 23) pp. 42-51.

Rothfield, Lawrence (ed). The Brooklyn Museum changed its name to Brooklyn Museum of Art in 1997, on March 12,2004, the museum announced that it would revert to its previous name. In April 2004, the museum opened the James Polshek-designed entrance pavilion on the Eastern Parkway façade, in September 2014, Lehman announced that he was planning to retire around June 2015.

In September 1999, Sensation, an exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum, opened its doors, igniting a controversy still burning in the art world. This collection of cutting-edge art from the Saatchi collection in England, and the museum’s arrangements with Charles Saatchi to finance the show, so offended New York City mayor Rudolph Giuliani that he attempted to shut the museum down by withholding city funds that are crucially needed by that institution. Only a legal ruling prevented him from doing so. Like the Robert Mapplethorpe exhibition before it, Sensation once again raises questions about public spending for “controversial” art, but with the added dimension of religious conflict and charges of commercialization.

The contributors to this volume use the Sensation exhibition as a stepping-stone to analyze larger questions such as the authority the government has to withhold funds, various interpretations of the First Amendment, how to respect divergent cultural and religious values; and the economic stake of museums and dealers in art. In their articles—written expressly for this volume, and spanning the disciplines of law, cultural studies, public policy, and art—the contributors consider issues at the center of arts policy. They propose various legal strategies, curatorial practices, and standards of doing business intended to serve the public interest in the arts.