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ISBN:0878407871
Author: Altstein
ISBN13: 978-0878407873
Title: Does Family Preservation Serve a Child's Best Interests? (Controversies in Public Policy)
Format: lrf lrf docx rtf
ePUB size: 1857 kb
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Language: English
Category: Social Sciences
Publisher: Georgetown University Press; First Edition edition (August 2, 2000)
Pages: 168

Does Family Preservation Serve a Child's Best Interests? (Controversies in Public Policy) by Altstein



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Start by marking Does Family Preservation Serve a Child's Best Interests? as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Claiming that there is insufficient evidence that family preservation actually works, Howard Altstein counters that children from truly dysfunctional families should be given the chance for stable lives through adoption rather than left in limbo.

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Article in Journal of Child and Family Studies 10(1):137-140 · March 2001 with 3 Reads. DOI: 1. 023/A:1016641803434. Cite this publication.

Does Family Preservation Serve a Child's Best Interests? (Controversies in Public Policy): ISBN 9780878407873 (978-0-87840-787-3) Softcover, Georgetown University Press, 2000. Global Perspectives on Social Issues: Marriage and Divorce. by Rita J. Simon, Howard Altstein. Founded in 1997, BookFinder. Coauthors & Alternates.

Journal of Child and Family Studies. Georgetown University Press. These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Controversies in Public Policy). ISBN13: 9780878407873. Does Family Preservation Serve a Child's Best Interests? by Howard Altstein and Ruth G. In this new volume, two distinguished professors of social work debate the question of whether family preservation or adoption serves the best interests of abused and neglected children. Arguing the merits of keeping families together whenever possible, Ruth G. McRoy examines the background, theory, and effectiveness of family preservation programs.

Learn what the "best interests of the child" standard means and how to show the courts that you have your child's best interests at heart. Family court judges prefer not to disrupt a child's routine when possible. The child's age. Young children generally need more hands-on care than older children. Courts also look at the bond between the child and the parent when evaluating child custody options and deciding what would be in the child's best interests. In addition, when children are young, judges frequently defer to the parent who has been the primary caregiver in the child’s life.

Child's Best Interest Standard. To determine this question, most family courts across the . use the standard known as the child’s best interests. While there is no perfect formula for determining what is in the child’s best interest, the analysis by judges and family court mediators often includes a variety of factors tailored to the particular child or children in question. Thus, when determining who gets custody and visitation and on what terms, the child’s interests prevail over their parent’s desires. Just because a child prefers one parent over the other does not override the court’s consideration for the other factors. Environmental factors such as the quality of education in each parent’s school district, the safety of each’s neighborhood, and proximity to other extracurricular activities.

In this new volume, two distinguished professors of social work debate the question of whether family preservation or adoption serves the best interests of abused and neglected children.Arguing the merits of keeping families together whenever possible, Ruth G. McRoy examines the background, theory, and effectiveness of family preservation programs. She provides practical recommendations and pays particular attention to the concerns of African American children.Claiming that there is insufficient evidence that family preservation actually works, Howard Altstein counters that children from truly dysfunctional families should be given the chance for stable lives through adoption rather than left in limbo.