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ISBN:1405125292
Author: Nicholas Smirnoff
ISBN13: 978-1405125291
Title: Antioxidants and Reactive Oxygen Species in Plants (Biological Sciences Series)
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ePUB size: 1744 kb
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Language: English
Category: Science and Mathematics
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell; 1 edition (August 26, 2005)
Pages: 320

Antioxidants and Reactive Oxygen Species in Plants (Biological Sciences Series) by Nicholas Smirnoff



UK. Titles in the series: Biology of Farmed Fish. Page 10. Antioxidants and reactive oxygen species in plants. The evidence from manipulation of PARP levels in divergent plant species confirms that cessation of growth is not a necessary adaptive response to stress, but rather a result of an unnecessary cellular response to stress.

Ames (Iowa): Blackwell Publishing Professional. xiii + 302 p; il. index. Plant Pathology, Physiology & Weed Science, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia.

FRY . iii 7 CONTENTS Reactive oxygen species as signalling molecules RADHIKA DESIKAN. 1 NADPH oxidases in polarised plant cells 8. calcium and ion channels . 6 . The role of calcium in regulating plant NOXs . 3 Introduction The roles of ROS in plant development NADPH oxidase and ROS in plant cell morphogenesis . 7. JOHN. in cell walls ROBERT . 3 The cell wall and the apoplast Reactive oxygen species H2O2 in plant cell walls . 8 169 172 174 174 175 179 179 180 182 184 187 187 190 191 Reactive oxygen species in plant development and pathogen defence MARK . The role of ROP GTPases in regulating plant NOXs.

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced during the interaction of metabolism with oxygen. However, more recently, it has become apparent that ROS also have important roles as signalling molecules

Nicholas Smirnoff, School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, University of Exeter, UK. 4. Ascorbate peroxidase. 8. Reactive oxygen species in plant development and pathogen defence. Mark A. Jones and Nicholas Smirnoff, School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, University of Exeter, UK. 9. Reactive oxygen species in cell walls. I can certainly recommend Antioxidants and Reactive Oxygen Species in Plants to graduate students with a background in plant molecular biology, biochemistry and environmental biology and who have an interest in the growing significance of ROS in so many aspects of plant life.

Reactive oxygen species and photosynthesis. Barry Logan, Biology Department, Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine, US. 1. Plant responses to ozone. Pinja Jaspers, Hannes Kollist, Christian Langebartels, and Jaakko Kangasjarvi, Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki, Finland. source: Nielsen Book Data)9781405120528. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced during the interaction of metabolism with oxygen

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced during the interaction of metabolism with oxygen. However, more recently, it has become apparent that ROS also have important roles as signalling molecules

Plants exposed to biotic and abiotic stresses generate more reactive oxygen species (ROS) than their capacity to scavenge them. Biological molecules are susceptible to attack by ROS, including several proteins, polyunsaturated fatty acids and nucleic acids. The cellular arsenal for scavenging ROS and toxic organic radicals include ascorbate, glutathione, tocopherol, carotenoids, polyphenols, alkaloids and other compounds. Smirnoff N, Antioxidants and reactive oxygen species in plants, Blackwell Publishing (2005). CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

Chloroplasts are the major cellular source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and under low temperature they are often the first and the most severely affected organelles (Kratsch and Wise, 2000). Therefore, the control of oxidative stress through the reinforcement of scavenging and detoxifying mechanisms is crucial to plant tolerance and survival under cold conditions (Mano, 2002; Logan, 2005). Yet, impairments of the efficiency of light energy capture and use may happen, with PSII being recognized as one of the most important sites of photoinhibition, occurring both from the donor and the acceptor side of the reaction center (Barber and De Las Rivas, 1993).

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced during the interaction of metabolism with oxygen. As ROS have the potential to cause oxidative damage by reacting with biomolecules, research on ROS has concentrated on the oxidative damage that results from exposure to environmental stresses and on the role of ROS in defence against pathogens. However, more recently, it has become apparent that ROS also have important roles as signalling molecules. A complex network of enzymatic and small molecule antioxidants controls the concentration of ROS and repairs oxidative damage, and research is revealing the complex and subtle interplay between ROS and antioxidants in controlling plant growth, development and response to the environment.

This book covers these new developments, generally focussing on molecular and biochemical details and providing a point of entry to the detailed literature. It is directed at researchers and professionals in plant molecular biology, biochemistry and cell biology, in both the academic and industrial sectors.