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ISBN:0521684862
Author: William Harnett,Les Chappell
ISBN13: 978-0521684866
Title: Subversion of Immune Cell Signalling by Parasites: Volume 41, Symposia of the British Society for Parasitology
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ePUB size: 1163 kb
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Language: English
Category: Medicine and Health Sciences
Publisher: Cambridge University Press (January 30, 2006)
Pages: 76

Subversion of Immune Cell Signalling by Parasites: Volume 41, Symposia of the British Society for Parasitology by William Harnett,Les Chappell



Volume 130, Issue S1. March 2005, pp. S1-S2. Subversion of immune cell signalling by parasites. WILLIAM HARNETT and L. H. CHAPPELL. Published online: 11 November 2005. Send article to Kindle. To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-replyridge. Find out more about sending to your Kindle  . Volume 130, Issue S1.

The articles contained within this volume were produced by speakers (and their colleagues) at the 2004 British Society for Parasitology Autumn Symposium on ‘Subversion of immune cell signalling by parasites’. Together they provide an introduction to the topic as well as detailed insights into the immune subversion mechanisms employed by eukaryotic parasites.

The membership of the BSP now stands at around 1000 with approximately 300 from overseas. Parasitology News is the newsletter of the British Society of Parasitology. Published 3 times a year. British Society For Parasitology BSP Secretariat Cathy Fuller 87 Gladstone St Bedford MK41 7RS. Telephone +44 (0) 15 Fax +44 (0) 15.

The role of The British Society for Parasitology is to draw attention to the unique importance of parasitology as a distinct discipline within biology. With membership of the British Society for Parasitology you can get discounts for events, eligibility for awards or grants and much more. BSP Spring meeting 2019. The 2019 Spring Meeting will be held in Manchester on 15-17 April 2019. The deadline for poster abstracts has been extended until the end of Monday 11th March. BSP Autumn Symposium 2019. The 2019 Autumn Symposium will be held at Queens University Belfast, on ‘Post-genomic progress in helminth parasitology’. BSP Spring Meeting 2020.

Leishmania parasites are able to secure their survival and propagation within their host by altering signalling pathways involved in the ability of macrophages to kill pathogens or to engage adaptive immune system. An important step in this immune evasion process is the activation of host protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 by Leishmania. The first signal is triggered by the binding of the T-cell receptor (TCR) to the MHC II-Ag complex on the APC, and the second is provided by the binding of CD28 or CD40L on T cells to costimulatory molecules of APCs such as those of the B7 family or CD40. Interestingly, apart from interfering with the first signal by inhibiting MHC II presentation, Leishmania has been demonstrated to interfere with M∅ costimulatory signals.

Sponsored by the Australian Society for Parasitology. The impact of parasites on the health and conservation of wildlife is seen as an important area covered by the journal especially the potential role of environmental factors, for example climate. Also important to the journal is 'one health' and the nature of interactions between wildlife, people and domestic animals, including disease emergence and zoonoses.

One of the most studied fields within the discipline of parasitology is immunoparasitology. The main emphasis is understanding the interaction between the host immune system and the invading parasite in order that information can be gained to aid parasite control and hence improve human health. The articles contained within this volume were produced by speakers (and their colleagues) at the 2004 British Society for Parasitology Autumn Symposium on 'Subversion of immune cell signalling by parasites'. Together they provide an introduction to the topic as well as detailed insights into the immune subversion mechanisms employed by eukaryotic parasites.