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ISBN:0198530331
Author: Peter White
ISBN13: 978-0198530336
Title: Biopsychosocial Medicine: An Integrated Approach to Understanding Illness
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ePUB size: 1571 kb
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Language: English
Category: Medicine and Health Sciences
Publisher: Oxford University Press (June 23, 2005)
Pages: 266

Biopsychosocial Medicine: An Integrated Approach to Understanding Illness by Peter White



I wish he had attempted to incorporate the discussions with the rest of the book, but he preferred to try to keep them as & as they were on the day'. I also think there were lost opportunities to contribute to progress in the field. As he points out in discussion, George Engel's work in the 1970s, which of course is seminal for the understanding of the biopsychosocial approach, became influential in the context of the acknowledgement of the limits of biomedicine by, for example, Thomas McKeown and Ivan Illich. I found this a useful insight. Davey Smith's own chapter argues that there is, in fact, little evidence that psychosocial factors have a direct aetiological effect on physical illness and biological processes.

Biopsychosocial Medicine : An Integrated Approach to Understanding Illness. Oxford: Oxford University Press. I did not find too much new in this book. It is composed of twelve presentations on biopsychosocial medicine given at a conference in London in 2002 to which international experts were invited.

Biopsychosocial Medicine book. The biopsychosocial model is an approach to medicine which stresses the importance of a holistic approach. It considers factors outside the biological process of illness when trying to understand health and disease. In this approach, a person's social context and psychological wellbeing are key factors in their illness and recovery, along with their thoughts, beliefs and e The biopsychosocial model is an approach to medicine which stresses the importance of a holistic approach.

October 2005 · Occupational Medicine. Craig Andrew Jackson. M. Anne Crowther and Brenda White, On soul and conscience: the medical expert and crime January 1990 · Medical history. Integrated neuro-orthopedics and algology medicine October 2013.

The biopsychosocial model is an approach to medicine which stresses the importance of a holistic approach. In this approach, a person's social context and psychological well-being are key factors in their illness and recovery, along with their thoughts, beliefs and emotions. Biopsychosocial Medicine examines the concept and the utility of this approach from its history to its application, and from its philosophical underpinnings to the barriers to its implementation. Another exceedingly inaccurate book from Peter White and the "Wessely school. Peter White is the Chief Medical Officer of Swiss Reinsurance which seeks to limit payouts to patients. White's biopsychosocial approach facilitates this denial of benefits. One example of misinformation: "I want to come back to the concept of phobia. In this approach, a person's social context and psychological wellbeing are key factors in their illness and recovery, along with their thoughts, beliefs and emotions. Peter White is professor of English and dean of University College at the University of New Mexico. Библиографические данные. Biopsychosocial Medicine: An Integrated Approach to Understanding Illness. Издание: иллюстрированное, перепечатанное.

Bibliographic Citation. Oxford/New York: Oxford University Press, 2005. Moses Maimonides' Contribution to the Biopsychosocial Approach in Clinical Medicine . Bloch, Sidney (2001-09-08). Integrated Medicine: Orthodox Meets Alternative - Integrated Medicine Is Not New . Morrell, Peter (2001-01-20). Understanding Medical Professionalism: A Plea for an Inclusive and Integrated Approach .

Publisher : OUP Oxford.

Biopsychosocial Medicine: an Integrated Approach to Understanding Illness Peter White, ed. Oxford University Press, 2005. com Vol 365 June 25, 2005. The literariness of scientic writing is increasingly recognised. Yet compila-tions of quotations generally feature scanty offerings. Bill Bynum and the late Roy Porter’s corrective plucks pas-sages from an enormous range of lit-eratures of science, and on science. Since good dictionaries of medical quotations already exist, entries on clinical medicine are limited. But the line between science and medicine is difcult to discern, and some clinicians do nd a place, including Lister on compound fractures. The selection derives largely from famous gures, from Galen to Galton,.

Biopsychosocial Medicine. An integrated approach to understanding illness. She published a remarkable book, Illness as metaphor, a year after Engels 1977 article appeared. Sontag wrote about how in plague-ridden England in the late sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, it was believed that a happy man would not get the plague. She stated that, The fantasy that a happy state of mind would fend off disease flourished for all infectious diseases before the nature of infection was understood. In his chapter in the 1948 book Progress in clinical medicine Avery Jones said, There have not been any major advances in the treatment of gastroduodenal ulcer.

To what extent do social factors such as stress cause physical diseases? How do physical and social factors contribute to the healing process? The biopsychosocial model is an approach to medicine which stresses the importance of a holistic approach. It considers factors outside the biological process of illness when trying to understand health and disease. In this approach, a person's social context and psychological wellbeing are key factors in their illness and recovery, along with their thoughts, beliefs and emotions. Biopsychosocial Medicine examines the concept and the utility of this approach from its history to its application, and from its philosophical underpinnings to the barriers to its implementation. It is severely critical of the failure of modern medicine to treat the patient not the disease, and its neglect of psychological and social factors in the treatment of the ill. Focusing on chronic disabling ill health, this book takes the examples of arthritis, cancer, diabetes, lower back pain, irritable bowel syndrome and depression to show how the biopsychosocial model can be used in practice. It questions why, even when the biopsychosocial approach has been proved to be more effective than traditional methods in overcoming these disorders, is not more routinely used, and how barriers to its implementation can be overcome. Controversial and challenging, Biopsychosocial Medicine will be essential reading for all those who feel the biomedical model is failing them and their patients. It will enable readers to understand the model and how it can be implemented, in order to enhance their confidence and success as health professionals.
Reviews: 4
Rishason
For the past two decades medicine has been engulfed in an ideological firestorm that is less about actual patients and their wellbeing than it is about professional promotion and a backlash against a medical model that does not give psychiatrists and psychologists a starring role in healthcare.

Although the editors and contributors of this book pay lip service to the concept of "integrated medicine" the biological portion of the biopsychosocial model is generally limited to the biological psychiatry (neuroscience and neurobiology) paradigm, which focuses primarily on the HPA axis.

This book gives a good overview of the thinking of one side of the raging battle in psychiatry as to how mental illness is defined, what is normal, and what is organic disease. However, I didn't find it to be balanced or mindful.

Just as there is more to medicine than mere mechanics, there is also more to medicine than the "mind." How such polarization is helpful to patients is not adequately addressed, possibly because the wellbeing of patients is not the real focus.

Although a number of organically classified diseases were used as examples, once again, balance was missing. When something is controversial, balance is presenting both sides, yet little or no attention was given to the large bodies of scientific research objectively refuting the stated views of the contributors.

If you want a good overview from a very specific point of view, you will find it here, but it essentially remains a book of self-promotion.
Gavidor
Another exceedingly inaccurate book from Peter White and the "Wessely school." Peter White is the Chief Medical Officer of Swiss Reinsurance which seeks to limit payouts to patients. White's biopsychosocial approach facilitates this denial of benefits.

One example of misinformation:
"I want to come back to the concept of phobia. Michael von Korff talked about back pain patients having a phobia about activity, as do chronic fatigue syndrome patients. One of the ways of overcoming this phobia is through behaviour and exposure." p.197

also see pp.129-130
Gom
The purpose of this book is not to weigh the evidence from biomedical and biopsychosocial models of health; it is to describe the under-represented view of biopsychosocial medicine from various perspectives, all of which purposefully focus on biopsychosocial concerns. Since Engel's description of a biopsychosocial model of health, very few have taken the time to investigate what this model may look like in practice. And this is not a concern only for psychiatry/psychology, a point made in Peter White's compilation. All of healthcare must consider how a new model may be implemented, but it is vital to remember that discussion will always take place outside of the clinic by those within the profession who can or will make the time for analytical discourse. This text aims to evaluate various perspectives of the biopsychsocial model to see if it more adequately represents the modern realities of healthcare, and if it does, then we can decide how to implement a new model. In healthcare, this is a painstakingly slow process; most practitioners will not make the time for it. This is not a fault. As the biopsychosocial model is only 30 years old, it is far too soon to expect that practitioners reasonably understand how such a paradigm shift may manifest itself in the clinic. Give this text a chance. It is will worth the read.
Iell
Outdated, unscientific drivel.