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ISBN:1107012414
Author: Jothie Rajah
ISBN13: 978-1107012417
Title: Authoritarian Rule of Law: Legislation, Discourse and Legitimacy in Singapore (Cambridge Studies in Law and Society)
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ePUB size: 1475 kb
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Language: English
Category: Law
Publisher: Cambridge University Press; Revised ed. edition (April 16, 2012)
Pages: 364

Authoritarian Rule of Law: Legislation, Discourse and Legitimacy in Singapore (Cambridge Studies in Law and Society) by Jothie Rajah



Authoritarian Rule of Law spans the period from colonization to the present, using a series of case studies to provide a sweeping as well as detailed and textured portrait of the rule of law in Singapore The book looks at case studies on a number of legislations and discusses academically at their relevance in relation to "rule of law" and "rule by law". The laws considered are the Vandalism Act, Newspaper and Printing Presses Act, Legal Profession (Amendment) Act, 1986 and Maintenance of Religious Harmony Act.

Rajah, Jothie, 1963-. Publication, Distribution, et. Cambridge ; New York. Cambridge University Press, (c)2012. Physical Description: xviii, 343 p. ;, 24 cm. Series Statement: Cambridge studies in law and society. General Note: Revised version of thesis (P. University of Melbourne, Melbourne Law School, 2010, issued under the title Legislating illiberalism. Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references (p. 299-331) and index. Formatted Contents Note

Part of the Cambridge Studies in Law and Society series. Scholars have generally assumed that authoritarianism and rule of law are mutually incompatible. Through a focus on Singapore, this book presents an analysis of authoritarian legalism. It shows how prosperity, public discourse, and a rigorous observance of legal procedure have enabled a reconfigured rule of law such that liberal form encases illiberal content. Institutions and process at the bedrock of rule of law and liberal democracy become tools to constrain dissent while augmenting discretionary political power - even as the national and international legitimacy of the state is secured

In Authoritarian Rule of Law: Legislation, Discourse and Legitimacy in Singapore (Cambridge University Press, 2012), Jothie Rajah tells a compelling story of the rule of law as discourse and praxis serving illiberal ends. Through a series of case studies on legislation criminalizing vandalism and regulating the print media, legal profession, and religion in Singapore, Rajah raises critical questions about the meaning and place of law in a postcolony that celebrates colonialism as a cause of its modernity, prosperity and plurality.

Convinced that free markets and rule of law must tip authoritarian societies in a liberal direction, nearly all studies of law and contemporary politics have neglected that improbable coupling: authoritarian rule of law. oritarian Rule of Law. html?hl ru&id gKkOeekxjIsC.

In Authoritarian Rule of Law: Legislation, Discourse and Legitimacy in Singapore (Cambridge University Press, 2012), Jothie Rajah tells a compelling story of the rule of law as discourse and praxis serving illiberal ends.

Recommend this journal. The Cambridge Law Journal. It shows how prosperity, public discourse, and a rigorous observance of legal procedure have enabled a reconfigured rule of law such that liberal form encases illiberal content

recent title august (1) Singapore Studies (1). refresh. Member recommendations. Rule of law doctrine in Singapore. Vandalism Act. â–¾LibraryThing members' description.

Scholars have generally assumed that authoritarianism and rule of law are mutually incompatible. Convinced that free markets and rule of law must tip authoritarian societies in a liberal direction, nearly all studies of law and contemporary politics have neglected that improbable coupling: authoritarian rule of law. Through a focus on Singapore, this book presents an analysis of authoritarian legalism. It shows how prosperity, public discourse, and a rigorous observance of legal procedure have enabled a reconfigured rule of law such that liberal form encases illiberal content. Institutions and process at the bedrock of rule of law and liberal democracy become tools to constrain dissent while augmenting discretionary political power - even as the national and international legitimacy of the state is secured. With China seeing lessons to be learned in Singapore, as do any number of regimes looking to replicate Singapore's pairing of prosperity and social control, this book offers a valuable and original contribution to understanding the complexities of law, language, and legitimacy in our time.