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ISBN:1906876274
Author: Alessio Patalano
ISBN13: 978-1906876272
Title: Maritime Strategy and National Security in Japan and Britain: From the First Alliance to Post 9/11
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ePUB size: 1188 kb
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Language: English
Category: Humanities
Publisher: Global Oriental (May 1, 2012)
Pages: 255

Maritime Strategy and National Security in Japan and Britain: From the First Alliance to Post 9/11 by Alessio Patalano



3 October 2012, London. Sharing a similar geography at the opposite ends of the Eurasian Continent, and dependent on maritime trade to supplement the lack of strategic resources, both the UK and Japan relied on the sea for their economic survival and independence as sovereign states. From the first alliance in 1902, through the World Wars, to the more recent operations in the Indian Ocean and Iraq, sea power has played a central role in the strategic calculus of both countries

From the first alliance in 1902, through the World Wars, to the more recent operations in the Indian Ocean and Iraq, sea power has played a central role in the strategic calculus of both countries. This thought-provoking book, comprising contributions from a group of international scholars, explores the strategic meaning of being an island nation.

Sharing a similar geography at the opposite ends of the Eurasian Continent and dependent on maritime trade to supplement the lack of strategic resources, both the UK and Japan relied on the sea for their economic survival and independence as sovereign states. From the first alliance in 1902, through the World Wars, to the more recent operations in the Indian Ocean and Iraq, sea power has played a central role in the strategic calculus of both countries.

From the first alliance in 1902, through the World Wars, to the more recent operations in the Indian Ocean and Iraq, sea power has played a central role in the strategic calculus of both countries.

Book Views: 24. Author. More books from author. Post-war Japan as a Sea Power: Imperial Legacy, Wartime Experience and the Making of a Navy by Alessio Patalano. Mon - Thu: 9:00 - 21 00.

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Start date at Kings: 1/10/2004. Post-war Japan as a sea power: imperial legacy, wartime experience and the making of a navy. Patalano, A. 2015 (Bloomsbury studies in military history). Special issue: rising tides: Seapower and regional security in northeast Asia. 2014 139 . bingdon : Taylor et Francis. Maritime strategy and national security in Japan and Britain: from the first alliance to post-9/11. 2012 Leiden: Brill.

Maritime Strategy and National Security in Japan and Britain: From the First Alliance to Post-9/11. Note: these are all the books on Goodreads for this author.

This book arises from a conference held in London in 2009 organized by the Department of War Studies at King’s College, London and the Japanese Embassy. The facts covered in the first historical section will be familiar to those who have studied the history of relations between Britain and Japan up to the end of the war. The British exercise of naval power in the Far East in the 1850s and 1860s was an object lesson for Japan and provided the spur for the Japanese Navy to model itself on the Royal Navy. The balance of power shifted in the twentieth century and the British came to see Japan as a rival rather than as a friend. Britain was declining and Japan rising. The fall of Singapore in 1942 marked the nadir of British power in the Far East.

Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2012. Where to find it. Online.

Positioned within the comparative literature on Japan and the UK, the volume will have wide-ranging appeal including studies in Anglo-Japanese relations, naval and military history, and studies in East Asian defence and security, including Anglo-American and US-Japan strategic interests.