» » Remythologizing Theology: Divine Action, Passion, and Authorship (Cambridge Studies in Christian Doctrine)
Download Remythologizing Theology: Divine Action, Passion, and Authorship (Cambridge Studies in Christian Doctrine) epub book
ISBN:0521470129
Author: Professor Kevin J. Vanhoozer
ISBN13: 978-0521470124
Title: Remythologizing Theology: Divine Action, Passion, and Authorship (Cambridge Studies in Christian Doctrine)
Format: mbr txt mobi doc
ePUB size: 1927 kb
FB2 size: 1961 kb
DJVU size: 1758 kb
Language: English
Category: Humanities
Publisher: Cambridge University Press (January 2010)
Pages: 539

Remythologizing Theology: Divine Action, Passion, and Authorship (Cambridge Studies in Christian Doctrine) by Professor Kevin J. Vanhoozer



The rise of modern science and the proclaimed 'death' of God in the nineteenth century led to a radical questioning of divine action and authorship - Bultmann's celebrated 'demythologizing'.

This contribution to the theology of divine action and authorship develops a fresh vision of Christian theism. It also revisits several long-standing controversies such as the relations of God's sovereignty to human freedom, time to eternity, and suffering to love. Only the communicating God can help" - the final line of Kevin Vanhoozer's Remythologizing Theology: Divine Action, Passion, and Authorship (Cambridge Studies in Christian Doctrine) (RM), playing on a statement from Bonhoeffer's prison letters, provides a succinct summary of his project in this creative and challenging theological reflection on the doctrine of God.

Cambridge Studies in Christian Doctrine.

Start by marking Remythologizing Theology: Divine Action, Passion, and Authorship as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. From 1998 he was Senior Lecturer in Theology and Religious Studies at New College, University of Edinburgh. Vanhoozer received a BA from Westmont College, an . iv from Westminster Theological Seminary, and a P.

Divine Action, Passion, and Authorship. This original contribution to the theology of divine action and authorship develops a fresh vision of Christian theism

Remythologizing Theology: Divine Action, Passion, and Authorship by Professor Kevin J. Vanhoozer. 18. Series Information. Like many concepts in the book world, "series" is a somewhat fluid and contested notion. A good rule of thumb is that series have a conventional name and are intentional creations, on the part of the author or publisher.

Remythologizing Theology: Divine Action, Passion, and Authorship. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-5214-7012-4. Faith Speaking Understanding: Performing the Drama of Doctrine. Louisville, KT: Westminster, John Knox Press. ISBN 978-0-6642-3448-5. Studies in Christian Doctrine and Scripture. Downers Grove, IL: IVP Academic.

Kevin Vanhoozer’s Remythologizing Theology helps answer this question. Vanhoozer approaches his task as an exercise in remythologizing. It begins with God’s communicative action, God’s drama. We know God only because God speaks. Vanhoozer had already laid out this approach in his The Drama of Doctrine. Not to put too fine a point on it, most pastors I know are even more familiar with the limits of their book budgets than with either the Myers-Briggs or the doctrine of the enhypostaton. If clergy are going to read this book, it will need to be priced for that market.

Kevin J. Vanhoozer's Documents. The Cambridge Companion To Postmodern Theology. Dictionary for Theological Interpretation of the Bible. Remythologizing Theology: Divine Action, Passion, and Authorship (Cambridge Studies in Christian Doctrine). Biblical Narrative in the Philosophy of Paul Ricoeur: A Study in Hermeneutics and Theology.

By Kevin J. Currently Blanchard Professor of Theology at Wheaton College, Kevin Vanhoozer presents "a communicative ontology (. a set of concepts with which to speak of -action) and sketches the contours of a theodramatic metaphysics (. Before offering ten theses on "remythologizing" (pp. 26-30), Vanhoozer establishes this project's agenda: "that both the transcendence and immanence of God are best viewed in terms of communicative agency rather than motional causality" (p. 24). The book consists of three parts.

The rise of modern science and the proclaimed 'death' of God in the nineteenth century led to a radical questioning of divine action and authorship - Bultmann's celebrated 'demythologizing'. Remythologizing Theology moves in another direction that begins by taking seriously the biblical accounts of God's speaking. It establishes divine communicative action as the formal and material principle of theology, and suggests that interpersonal dialogue, rather than impersonal causality, is the keystone of God's relationship with the world. This original contribution to the theology of divine action and authorship develops a fresh vision of Christian theism. It also revisits several long-standing controversies such as the relations of God's sovereignty to human freedom, time to eternity, and suffering to love. Groundbreaking and thought-provoking, it brings theology into fruitful dialogue with philosophy, literary theory, and biblical studies.
Reviews: 5
Giamah
Yet another strong effort from Kevin Vanhoozer. I'm a little biased as I was able to sit in on two of his doctoral level classes at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School in the summer of 1994. One class was on hermeneutics and postmodernism (and his then forthcoming book Is There a Meaning in This Text?) and the other was on Divine Action and Providence (which I think came to fruition with this book).

In this book he is trying to steer a course between the demythologizing Bultmann and the new kenotic-relational open theism school (Moltmann) while still being strongly rooted in Scripture and sacred tradition. I think he succeeds. This is not a full blown contemporary doctrine of providence, but it does focus on the vast majority of texts in the Bible which present God acting in the world, which depict God not usually splitting seas or stilling suns, but dialoging with humans, usually within a covenant framework. Vanhoozer affirms that the nature miracles were real and actual, but this is not the focus of his book. Too often studies get bogged down trying to understand nature miracles in a modern scientific framework, when the starting point needs to be: Can God speak, or not? Vanhoozer shows how, with a trinitarian metaphysics, it is reasonable and rational to hold that God has in fact spoken in the past, and continues to speak through Scripture primarily through the Spirit.

This book stands by itself but is best read after reading "Is There a Meaning in This Text" and "Drama of Doctrine".
Bloodhammer
"Only the communicating God can help" - the final line of Kevin Vanhoozer's Remythologizing Theology: Divine Action, Passion, and Authorship (Cambridge Studies in Christian Doctrine) (RM), playing on a statement from Bonhoeffer's prison letters, provides a succinct summary of his project in this creative and challenging theological reflection on the doctrine of God. Vanhoozer is a theologian whose central claim is that God truly has spoken and is speaking through speech that acts and acts that speak in such a way so as to faithfully consummate his creatures and creation as a whole. Many will be encouraged to see Vanhoozer move from the somewhat swampy plains of hermeneutics and methodology to tackle the heights of theology with his constructive take on who and what God is. However, far from leaving methodology behind, Vanhoozer builds on his previous work to try and steer a course between those who would demythologize God and ignore/deny the biblical witness (Bultmann; abstract perfect being theology; certain conceptions of classical theology) and those who mythologize God as some sort of super creature (Feuerbach; Moltmann and the "voluntary-kenotic-perichoretic-relational-panentheism" which forms a contemporary scholarly consensus). The demythologizers lose the "drama" of the divine theodrama played out in scripture and history; the mythologizers lose the "theo" as the triune God is reduced to the creaturely plane and becomes a projection of human ideals.

The book proceeds in three parts: a summary of the issues and positioning of Vanhoozer's project amid the contemporary theological landscape (Vanhoozer's "remythologizing" vs. the aforementioned "demythologizing" and "mythologizing"); a constructive description of who and what is God according to who God reveals Godself to be in scripture (triune "being-in-communicative-act" - God's being is in communicating); and the nature of the God world relation, given who and what God is (a dialogical Author on the Dostoevskey-ian/Bakhtin-ian model- which is also the richest section of the book, addressing questions of God's impassibility, his emotional life, and the possibility of genuine dialogue between Creator and creatures). As this brief summary implies, RM is a wide-ranging, challenging, creative discussion that assumes a good grasp of the contemporary theological scene (if the phrase "voluntary-kenotic-perichoretic-relational-panentheism" causes only confusion rather than a wry smile, this book may prove difficult, even though Vanhoozer is an admirably clear writer and provides copious footnotes to help situate his own claims within the scholarly landscape).

As mentioned, Vanhoozer's most fundamental commitment is that God has truly spoken and is truly speaking (in speech that acts and actions that speak) and that this revelation (Barth is often in the footnotes, along with Aquinas, Calvin, Ricoeur - Feuerbach and Moltmann are chief opponents) must discipline and shape any reflection on who and what God is - all else is simply anthropomorphic/ontotheological projection. RM presents a keen analysis and subversion of the dominant contemporary voluntary-kenotic-perichoretic-relational-panentheist paradigm, but its real significance is in Vanhoozer's constructive attempt and willingness to put forward a metaphysics that attempts to be truly biblical - a logos shaped by the mythos of the triune creating, covenanting, communicating God. While the book weighs in at 500+ dense pages, it rewards the reader's effort, and in fact, my only complaint is that I would like more (specifically, I would have liked a bit more on the relation between covenant and creation). Certainly, given the books length and assumption of a certain level of familiarity with contemporary theology, there is also a pastoral need to take some of these sometimes daunting theological ideas and work them out (with fear and trembling, creativity and courage) at the church and community level.

RM is a tremendous effort by one of the finest theologians writing in English today and highly recommended for those interested in the doctrine of God and a constructive theology that seeks to plant its roots firmly in the biblical witness. I certainly hope that there will be increased engagement with Vanhoozer's proposal in the years to come - both in the academy and in the church.
Jox
Vanhoozer is long-winded, but the book is a real education in modern theology. I really enjoyed it--and especially Vanhoozer's sharp riposte to the 'new orthodoxy'!
Use_Death
This book is not meant for most people. Why? (1) The wording is highly crafted, imaginative, and evocative. However, that style often obstructs the clarity and readability of the text. I am a highly educated Ph.d student in political philosophy, and I found it very difficult to understand what Vanhoozer is saying. You have to lock onto the rare sentence that says something concrete and extrapolate from that. Often you get only a sense of what he is saying, the gist, rather than the substance. (2) Vanhoozer is not dealing with anything the ordinary Christian cares about. He is responding to complex arguments in contemporary theology. This is another reason that it is difficult to understand: he presupposes a vast amount of background knowledge in academic theology. Professional theologians might find this book useful, but it will seem esoteric to most Christians. For example, one of the chapters makes the (seemingly) simple point that God-in-three-persons cannot be reduced to the "economic trinity," meaning what the three persons of the trinity do in relation to each other and to creation. Apparently some contemporary theologians believe that God has no existence outside of his external relationships, but I suspect that thought has never entered the mind of most ordinary Christians. Of course, this simple point was argued in very forbidding and complex language, as noted above.

Maybe my lack of understanding was my fault for venturing into a book outside of my specialization. Still, even if the academic theological community would benefit from this book, I'm going to give it three stars as a warning to the rest of us. I'm not sure even pastors would benefit from reading this.