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ISBN:0192839640
Author: Charlotte Brontë
ISBN13: 978-0192839640
Title: Villette (Oxford World's Classics)
Format: lrf mbr azw txt
ePUB size: 1476 kb
FB2 size: 1648 kb
DJVU size: 1778 kb
Language: English
Category: Humanities
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 2 edition (May 17, 2001)
Pages: 592

Villette (Oxford World's Classics) by Charlotte Brontë



Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, voluminous notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

Based in part on Charlotte Bronte's experience in Brussels ten years earlier, Villette (1853) is a cogent and dramatic exploration of a woman's response to the challenge of a constricting social environment. Its deployment of imagery comparable in power to that of Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights, and its use of comedyDSironic or exuberantDSin the service of an ultimately sombre vision, make Villette especially appealing to the modern reader.

Villette n/e (Oxford World's Classics) Paperback – 17 Apr 2008. by. Charlotte Brontë (Author). This item:Villette n/e (Oxford World's Classics) by Charlotte Brontë Paperback £. 4. The Tenant of Wildfell Hall (Wordsworth Classics) by Anne Brontë Paperback £. 0. I am only just returned to a sense of the real world about me, for I have been reading Villette, a still more wonderful book than Jane Eyre. George Eliot Lucy Snowe, in flight from an unhappy past, leaves England and finds work as a teacher in Madame Beck's school in 'Villette'. Strongly drawn to the fiery autocratic schoolmaster Monsieur Paul Emanuel, Lucy is compelled by Madame Beck's jealous interference to assert her right to love and be loved.

Written by. Charlotte Bronte. Manufacturer: Oxford Paperbacks Release date: 2 November 2000 ISBN-10 : 0192839640 ISBN-13: 9780192839640.

Oxford World's Classics. Lucy Snowe, in flight from an unhappy past, leaves England and finds work as a teacher in Madame Beck's school in 'Villette'. Based in part on Charlotte Brontë's experience in Brussels ten years earlier, Villette (1853) is a cogent and dramatic exploration of a woman's response to the challenge of a constricting social environment. Its deployment of imagery comparable in power to that of Emily Brontë's Wuthering Heights, and its use of comedy–ironic or exuberant–in the service of an ultimately sombre vision, make Villette especially appealing to the modern reader.

oxford world’s classics For over  years Oxford World’s Classics have brought readers closer to the world’s great literature. Lucy Snowe, in Charlotte’s final novel Villette, presents a duplicitous narrator who plays with the reader and dupes even herself. The juvenilia demonstrate that even at an early age, Charlotte’s grasp of narrative process and its implications was surprisingly sophisticated. In ‘Albion and Marina’, written at 14 years old, Charlotte’s sharp observation of her own creative process is clearly evident, and in an article in the ‘Young Men’s Magazine’ she imagines this process from.

Author:Charlotte Bronte. Jane Eyre (The World's Best Reading). We appreciate the impact a good book can have. Jane Eyre Charlotte Bronte Oxford World's Classics. Dispatched with Royal Mail 2nd Class.

First published in 1853, Villette draws from Charlotte Brontë's experiences in Brussels in the 1840's. In this emotionally charged tale, we see Lucy Snowe's response to the challenges of her restrictive social environment as she flees from her unhappy past in England to a new life as a teacher at Madame Beck's school in Villette. This new edition features the definitive Clarendon edition of Villette which is derived from the earliest printings of Brontë's great work. The text is supplemented with a newly commissioned introduction, which gives a thorough and in depth analysis of the context of this fine example of the nineteenth century novel.
Reviews: 7
Vital Beast
This is one of those books, like Jane Eyre, that I wish I’d read when I was young and impressionable. It would have probably done me more good that Sweet Valley High and an endless stream of Christopher Pike, R.L. Stine and V.C. Andrews novels. Not that there’s anything wrong with those books, but a protagonist who isn’t always the prettiest or the most talented and who’s happy with a man who’s not always the most dashing or handsome would have been helpful during my formative years.

The titular Agnes is a young woman of modest means who takes work as a governess to help her family through financial hardship. Most of the book is dedicated to her hardships as a governess. More specifically, Agnes is constantly hampered in her attempts to educate or discipline her pupils by the parents’ insistence that the children are perfect special snowflakes who should not be unduly upset or bothered by the governess. It is later in the book that she meets Edward Weston and soon realizes she is in love with him. It’s not his looks, charm or even wit that attract her but his kindness, morality and piety.

The book is short and the plot is straightforward with very few twists and turns. Like Agnes, it wastes no time on frivolities but gets right to the point. It’s plain but it’s certainly not dull. It’s a book I would give is a gift to a girl just entering the tween years with the hope that it plants a seed that blooms into something bigger.
wanderpool
Charlotte Bronte's "Villette" is the sixth book I have read by the Bronte sisters, the third by Charlotte, and you would think by now that I could not be anymore amazed by their brilliance than I was previously but, once again, that was not the case.

"Villette" is an amazing piece of literature, at times it reads like magical and enchanting poetry, and at other times it reads exactly like a diary, uncensored, but like all great literature it reads with a haunting honesty that borders on the sublime.

Lucy Snowe, like Ms. Bronte's Jane Eyre, is a character whose appeal and inquisitiveness sets the stage for an analytic and intrusive insight into a society where an ambitious and smart woman's place in the workforce is still an unacceptable and alien concept, unless the woman's ambition is limited to being a servant, a governess, or a teacher.

"Villette" is the last of Charlotte Bronte's novels and it goes places and poses questions about religion, morals, corruption,and ambition that are still being heatedly debated one hundred and seventy years later.

This is a very long novel and it is the type of book that should be read carefully and patiently, and more than once. It has so much to offer and it simply overflows with brilliance and reawakens many of our dreams and desires that we might have long ago forgotten but we should never have buried.
Rrinel
I am not the greatest at writing book reviews, so I will just say that Villette is an excellent book, but you shouldn't expect it to be just like Jane Eyre, although there are several parallels. If you liked Jane Eyre you might like this too, especially if you have experienced loneliness, unrequited love, and/or depression. It's less about plot than it is about the secretive narrator's mind. I took a break halfway through because it was very dense and slow going but I'm glad I read it. Mallory Ortberg's Introduction is also excellent and shed new light on the book for me. The cover art is lovely, a violet metallic on that cream pebbly paper, and the pages have deckle edges.
However, large portions of the book are in French with no English translation given. This really bogged me down as a reader because I never learned French and had to rely on the Google Translate app (it uses your smartphone camera to translate text in real time, so useful) and my limited knowledge of French and Italian words/grammar to understand what was going on. I really don't understand why they didn't include the English translations for the French conversations in footnotes. Even endnotes would have been helpful. I was quite disappointed at that. If I had known about the lack of English translations, I wouldn't have bought this edition. I'm not going to return the book since I did like it, but I wanted to warn you.