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ISBN:0292720777
Author: Robert M. O'Neil,Lloyd N. Morrisett,Bruce Buchanan
ISBN13: 978-0292720770
Title: Electing a President: The Markle Commission Research on Campaign '88
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Language: English
Category: Humanities
Publisher: University of Texas Press; 1st edition (May 1, 1991)
Pages: 252

Electing a President: The Markle Commission Research on Campaign '88 by Robert M. O'Neil,Lloyd N. Morrisett,Bruce Buchanan



Markle Commission on the Media and the Electorate. 95 Author: Gibbons, Gail. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

Corporate Name: Markle Commission on the Media and the Electorate.

Why did campaign ’88 represent an all-time low in the minds of many voters? These are some of the questions that impel this thought-provoking analysis of the 1988 presidential election, sponsored by the John and Mary R. Markle Foundation. Using extensive empirical studies of the candidates, the media, and the voters, Bruce Buchanan, executive director of the Markle Commission on the Media and the Electorate, traces the roots of popular dissatisfaction with the 1988 election

Why did campaign ’88 represent an all-time low in the minds of many voters? These are some of the questions that impel this thought-provoking analysis of the 1988 presidential election has been added to your Cart. Flip to back Flip to front. by. Bruce Buchanan (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more.

Buchanan argues that the campaign drifted too far from popular ideals of how democratic processes ought to work-that the substitution of negative advertising and quickie sound bites for reasoned debate on national problems and issues alienated much of the electorate, causing the lowest voter turnout in sixty-four years. Electing a President does just that. Foreword by Lloyd N. Morrisett. Introduction by Robert M. O’Neil. 1. What Was Wrong with the 1988 Election? 2. Good Democratic Practice: Responsibilities in Presidential Elections. 4. The News Media in Campaign ’88: What They Covered and How They Covered It. 5. What the Electorate Learned. 6. Citizens in Groups. 7. 1992 and Beyond: The Markle Commission Recommendations.

Electing A President:.

Electing a President. Bruce Buchanan is Professor of Government at the University of Texas at Austin. More about Bruce Buchanan. Electing a President.

Published 1991 by University of Texas Press in Austin.

The image of a prison with a revolving door helped George Bush win the presidency in 1988, but did negative advertising damage the electoral process itself? Why did campaign ’88 represent an all-time low in the minds of many voters? These are some of the questions that impel this thought-provoking analysis of the 1988 presidential election, sponsored by the John and Mary R. Markle Foundation.

Using extensive empirical studies of the candidates, the media, and the voters, Bruce Buchanan, executive director of the Markle Commission on the Media and the Electorate, traces the roots of popular dissatisfaction with the 1988 election. Buchanan argues that the campaign drifted too far from popular ideals of how democratic processes ought to work—that the substitution of negative advertising and quickie “sound bites” for reasoned debate on national problems and issues alienated much of the electorate, causing the lowest voter turnout in sixty-four years.

Negative campaigning, however, cannot bear the full blame for the 1988 election. While the Markle Commission offers specific recommendations for improvements in candidate and media performance, the great need, says Buchanan, is for voters to reclaim the electoral process, to insist that candidates and the media give enough information about positions and programs for voters to make informed choices. Voters need to be educated out of the idea that democratic elections and representative government can somehow occur without the participation of ordinary citizens.

At a time when the American democratic process is being used as a model by newly independent nations around the world, it is particularly appropriate to ask how well it works at home. Electing a President does just that.