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ISBN:0892368071
Author: Oliver Taplin
ISBN13: 978-0892368075
Title: Pots & Plays: Interactions between Tragedy and Greek Vase-painting of the Fourth Century B.C.
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ePUB size: 1914 kb
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Language: English
Category: Humanities
Publisher: J. Paul Getty Museum; 1 edition (October 15, 2007)
Pages: 304

Pots & Plays: Interactions between Tragedy and Greek Vase-painting of the Fourth Century B.C. by Oliver Taplin



Although Greek tragedy usually generates greater popularity and interest than comedy, past studies of the depiction on ceramic vases of theater scenes have mostly concentrated on comedies. A significant proportion of the vases with depictions of tragedy was first published only in the last twenty-five years. There has been no sustained attempt to discuss these exciting additions in relation to tragedy, nor to reconsider the cultural context in the light of these discoveries. Through detailed scrutiny of some 109 vases and vase fragments with depictions of Greek tragedies, he is able to identify plays and scenes by the great playwrights Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides.

This interdisciplinary study opens up a fascinating interaction between art and theater. It shows how the mythological vase-paintings of fourth-century . Greeks, especially those settled in southern Italy, are more meaningful for those who had seen the myths enacted in the popular new medium of tragedy. Of some 300 relevant vases, 109 are reproduced and accompanied by a This interdisciplinary study opens up a fascinating interaction between art and theater. Greeks, especially those settled in southern Italy, are more meaningful for those who had seen the myths enacted in the popular new medium of tragedy

Oliver Taplin here sets out to examine the previously understudied tragic scenes.

It shows how the mythological vase-paintings of fourth-century . Of some 300 relevant vases, 109 are reproduced and accompanied by a picture-by-picture discussion. This book supplies a rich and unprecedented resource from a neglected treasury of painting. Oliver Taplin is Professor of Classics at Magdalen College, University of Oxford, and a Fellow of the British Academy. He is a specialist on the interpretation of Greek drama through performance in both ancient and modern times.

Theater in art. Greek drama (Tragedy) - Illustrations.

Pots and Plays: Interactions between Tragedy and Greek Vase-painting in the Fourth Century . Los Angeles: J. Paul Getty Museum, 2007. ISBN 978-0-89236-807-5. Taplin builds upon his earlier book, Comic Angels (1993), by focusing on representations of tragedy in South Italian vase-painting from the fourth century .

What a welcome book this is. Oliver Taplin has been a key figure in persuading the present generation of scholars that our preserved texts of drama were composed as scripts for performance rather than just the pieces of literature they were for most of our teachers. Taplin does not like to think of the children, shown on the vase, as being present on stage at this point, but why not? Certainly in the painting the girl next to Iokasta looks round worriedly at her mother's sudden tension on hearing the messenger's news, and so plays a considerable role in the characterisation of the scene. I find Taplin too reluctant throughout this volume to suppose or admit the presence on stage of non-speaking extras, whether or not there is direct reference to them in the text.

Greek painted pottery from the fourth century . is one of the largest and most remarkable bodies of theatrically informed material that still survives. Pots and Plays" is a thorough and insightful re-evaluation of over 100 Greek vases - mostly from the Greek communities of southern Italy. It demonstrates that while most paintings are not direct representations of actors or scenes, they can be interpreted as referring to theatrical performance.

This interdisciplinary study opens up a fascinating interaction between art and theater. It shows how the mythological vase-paintings of fourth-century B.C. Greeks, especially those settled in southern Italy, are more meaningful for those who had seen the myths enacted in the popular new medium of tragedy. Of some 300 relevant vases, 109 are reproduced and accompanied by a picture-by-picture discussion. This book supplies a rich and unprecedented resource from a neglected treasury of painting.