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ISBN:0415097258
Author: Keith Jenkins
ISBN13: 978-0415097253
Title: On 'What Is History?': From Carr and Elton to Rorty and White (Historical Connections)
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ePUB size: 1737 kb
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Language: English
Category: Humanities
Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (December 2, 1995)
Pages: 212

On 'What Is History?': From Carr and Elton to Rorty and White (Historical Connections) by Keith Jenkins



Keith Jenkins is Senior Lecturer in history at Chichester Institute of Higher Education. He is the author of Rethinking History (Routledge 1991). Series: Historical Connections. The book contains a critique of . Carr's and Geoffrey Elton's views on what history is, as well as a discussion of the thinking of philosopher Richard Rorty and the historian Hayden White. The author takes a "revisionist" view on Carr, seeing him as not so much a relativist as an advocate for his own left-wing modernity. Elton is dismissed as a shallow die-hard representative of "bourgeois" history.

On ‘What is History?’ In this book Keith Jenkins argues that older modernist discussions about the nature of history - including those by Carr and Elton are now partial and dated guides to contemporary debates. He advocates that they be ‘replaced’ by two other theorists, Richard Rorty and Hayden White. In his introduction and first chapter, Keith Jenkins places Carr, Elton, Rorty and White within current discussions concerning the discourse of history. Keith Jenkins’ exploration of Hayden White’s work is particularly significant. For although White has long been recognised as one of the most original history theorists currently writing, his work is actually little read and little understood in many orthodox historical arenas, or by most history students. Jenkins argues that the neglect of White and the general suspicion of ‘theory’ among many historians are issues which need to be urgently addressed.

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Book: Why History? Ethics and Postmodernity Keith Jenkins Abingdon, Routledge, 1999, ISBN: 9780415164160; 248pp. Book: Refiguring History: New Thoughts on an Old Discipline Keith Jenkins Abingdon, Routledge, 2003, ISBN: 9780415244107; 96pp. In Refiguring History (2003), described by Hayden White as a ‘small masterpiece’, Jenkins attempts, somewhat paradoxically it must be said, to breath new life into history by refiguring it as a discourse that gratefully accepts and elaborates the inevitable failure of all historical representation. This he does by trying to promote in history the endless openness advocated by Derrida and other postmodern philosophers. That the postmodern analysis of history is itself merely the product of a particular historical phase, reflecting the decline of the West, a collapse in belief in progress and a disillusion with science (Tosh).

On 'what Is History?' book. Carr and Elton are still the starting point for the vast majority of introductory courses on the nature of history. Building on his highly successful Rethinking History, Keith Jenkins explores in greater detail the influence of these key figures. He argues that historians need t On & is History?' provides a student introduction to contemporary historiographical debates. Carr and Elton are still the starting point for the vast majority of introductory courses on the nature of history

On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book On "what is history?" : from Carr and Elton to Rorty and White, Keith Jenkins.

Building on his highly successful Rethinking History, Keith Jenkins explores in greater detail the influence of these key figures. He argues that historians need to move beyond their 'modernist' thinking and embrace the postmodern-type approaches of thinkers such as Richard Rorty and Hayden White. Through its radical critique of Carr and Elton and its championing of Rorty and White, On 'What is History'? represents a significant development for introductory studies on the nature of history. You cannot find a historical or geographical or scientific or literary discourse just out there, just growing wild. that Carr and Elton, unlike Rorty and White, are, in their modernisms, not much to the point when now discussing the question of 'what is history?' My approach has four parts.

On & is History?' provides a student introduction to contemporary historiographical debates. He argues that historians need to move beyond their & thinking and embrace the postmodern-type approaches of thinkers such as Richard Rorty and Hayden White

Keith Jenkins (1943) is a British historiographer. Jenkins studied medieval and modern history as well as political theory at The University of Nottingham. Re-thinking History" is simultaneously his first and best-known book. Jenkins retired from the position of professor of historical theory at the University of Chichester in 2008. Re-thinking History (1991). On "What is History" From Carr and Elton to Rorty and White (1995). The Postmodern History Reader (1997).

Re-thinking History by Keith Jenkins (1991-10-31). ZDB2K/?tag prabook0b-20. Re-thinking History (Routledge Classics) by Keith Jenkins (6-Feb-2003) Paperback. Like Hayden White and "postmodern" historiographers, Jenkins believes that any historian's output should be seen as a story. A work of history is as much about the historian's own world view and ideological positions as it is about past events. This means that different historians will inevitably ascribe different meaning to the same historical events.

On `What is History?' provides a student introduction to contemporary historiographical debates.Carr and Elton are still the starting point for the vast majority of introductory courses on the nature of history. Building on his highly successful Rethinking History, Keith Jenkins explores in greater detail the influence of these key figures. He argues that historians need to move beyond their `modernist' thinking and embrace the postmodern-type approaches of thinkers such as Richard Rorty and Hayden White.Through its radical critique of Carr and Elton and its championing of Rorty and White, On `What is History'? represents a significant development for introductory studies on the nature of history.
Reviews: 2
Nto
It was quite difficult to read because English is not my mother tongue. But I could understand what he wants to say. And if you need the post modernism view for your history study, good to read through. If you focus on it, you can finish reading in three days. The kindle version is also good because there is a dictionary attached.
Pad
The book contains a critique of E.H. Carr's and Geoffrey Elton's views on what history is, as well as a discussion of the thinking of philosopher Richard Rorty and the historian Hayden White. The two chapters on Carr and Elton are written in a lively polemical style, and contain interesting and thought-provoking commentary. The author takes a "revisionist" view on Carr, seeing him as not so much a relativist as an advocate for his own left-wing modernity. Elton is dismissed as a shallow die-hard representative of "bourgeois" history. My main two complaints about his argument is that Jenkins doesn't really explain why it is that he thinks that "modernity" is now finished: he just repeats this claim un-reflectively to explain why Carr and Elton are "out of date." His "ideological" claim (also made unconvincingly in the 1991 pamphlet Rethinking History) about history being "always for someone" - and mainstream historians in the British academia necessarily representing the interests of the bourgeoisie - is also left conveniently unexplained. I would still recommend reading the two chapters on Carr and Elton, though. As for the second half of the book - chapters on Rorty and White - I have to say that I struggled through. Discussion of Rorty appears rather irrelevant to any plausible discussion in a history seminar. White's thoughts, despite being hailed by Jenkins as vastly superior to both Carr's and Elton's, are not likely to make a strong impression on students, especially the whole discussion of the "tropological" (hmmm, my spell-checker is underlining this word - it may still be stuck in modernity) aspects of writing history, i.e. the idea that a historian's invention of history depends largely on his or her selection of "tropes" (metaphors, etc.). I wouldn't say that what Jenkins has to say is completely irrelevant (for one thing - and he underscores this - reading his critique raises one's awareness of the possible pitfalls of smuggling ideologically-laid pronouncements into one's writing), I just wouldn't try to teach this to students in any class on introduction to the theory of history. It's a useful read for someone who had spent a few years in the field engaging in the writing of "proper history," much ridiculed by Jenkins.