» » Beyond Nationalism: A Social and Political History of the Habsburg Officer Corps, 1848-1918
Download Beyond Nationalism: A Social and Political History of the Habsburg Officer Corps, 1848-1918 epub book
ISBN:0195045068
Author: Istvan Deak
ISBN13: 978-0195045062
Title: Beyond Nationalism: A Social and Political History of the Habsburg Officer Corps, 1848-1918
Format: lrf lrf mbr rtf
ePUB size: 1460 kb
FB2 size: 1767 kb
DJVU size: 1911 kb
Language: English
Category: Humanities
Publisher: Oxford University Press (May 14, 1992)
Pages: 304

Beyond Nationalism: A Social and Political History of the Habsburg Officer Corps, 1848-1918 by Istvan Deak



In the last seventy years of its long and distinguished existence, the Habsburg monarchy was plagued by the forces of rising nationalism. Still, it preserved domestic peace and provided the conditions for social, economic, and cultural progress in a vast area inhabited by eleven major nationalities and almost as many confessional groups. This study investigates the social origin, education, training, code of honor, lifestyle, and political role of the Habsburg officers. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. New York Oxford OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS 1990.

Simultaneously conservative and liberal, the officer corps, originally composed mainly of noblemen, willingly coopted thousands of commoners-among them an extraordinary number of Jews. Even during World War I, the army and its officers endured, surviving the dissolution of the state in October 1918, if only by a few days. The end of the multinational Habsburg army also marked the end of confessional and ethnic tolerance in Central and East Central Europe.

He then offers a concise history of the monarchy and of the role of the military within it down to the ascendancy of Franz Conrad von Hotzendorf. The long decades of peace between Koniggratz and the carnage on the Isonzo River were spent by the soldiers in garrison towns or on pacifi- cation campaigns in southern Dalmatia or Bosnia- Herzegovina.

Deak provides some background history and then discusses the army as it developed after the Revolutions of 1848, when a series of reforms produced the army that would fight the subsequent Hapsburg wars. The army saved the Hapsburg monarchy in 1848-1849, and its key role was to be police force of last resort for the remaining decades of the empire. Following the defeats by the French in 1958 and the Prussians in 1866, this was essentially the only role for the army until the outbreak of WWI, for which the Hapsburg army was not prepared particularly well  . If nothing else, this book gives a good sense of the basic structure of the Habsburg Officer corps.

Beyond Nationalism book. This study examines the role of the Habsburg Officer Corps in holding together the multi-ethnic Austro-Hungarian empire from the mid-19th century to its end in 1918. Stores ▾. Audible Barnes & Noble Walmart eBooks Apple Books Google Play Abebooks Book Depository Indigo Alibris Better World Books IndieBound.

Beyond Nationalism: A Social and Political History of the Habsburg Officer Corps, 1848-1918. Mistakes and Myths: The Allies, Germany, and the Versailles Treaty, 1918–1921. Socialism Goes Global: Decolonization and the Making of a New Culture of Internationalism in Socialist Hungary, 1956–1989. Mark et al. An Identity of Opinion: Historians and July 1914. Williamson Jr. et al.

István Deák, ebrary, Inc. Date. July Crisis: The Outbreak and Origins of the Great War (HIST3043) (V13321). Section: . Austria-Hungary. Next: Papers of Count Tisza, 1914-1918. Previous: The Last years of Austria-Hungary. Library availability.

Istvan Deak examines the Habsburg officer corps and the way in which it became the foremost preserver of the multi-ethnic Austro-Hungarian empire from the mid-nineteeth century to the empire's defeat in 1918. The officer corps was an important cohesive force in the empire, for it created a unified and loyal army from recruits representing all the different nationalities and ethnic groups of Austro-Hungary

Deák has written extensively on eastern and central European history and politics. His publications include Weimar Germany's Left-wing Intellectuals (1968); The Lawful Revolution: Louis Kossuth and the Hungarians, 1848-1849 (1979); Beyond Nationalism: A Social and Political History of the Habsburg Officer Corps, 1848-1918 (1990); and Essays on Hitler's Europe (2001). Beyond Nationalism: A Social and Political History of the Habsburg Officer Corps, 1848-1918. Oxford University Press. Essays on Hitler's Europe.

In the last seventy years of its long and distinguished existence, the Habsburg monarchy was plagued by the forces of rising nationalism. Still, it preserved domestic peace and provided the conditions for social, economic, and cultural progress in a vast area inhabited by eleven major nationalities and almost as many confessional groups. This study investigates the social origin, education, training, code of honor, lifestyle, and political role of the Habsburg officers. Simultaneously conservative and liberal, the officer corps, originally composed mainly of noblemen, willingly coopted thousands of commoners--among them an extraordinary number of Jews. Even during World War I, the army and its officers endured, surviving the dissolution of the state in October 1918, if only by a few days. The end of the multinational Habsburg army also marked the end of confessional and ethnic tolerance in Central and East Central Europe.
Reviews: 7
THOMAS
It is not without flaws. Requires some general understanding of Austria-Hungary. Personally, I enjoyed the book. There is a lot of useful information within. As I said, for the price, I would read up on A-H a bit before delving into this book.
Xellerlu
This is a surprisingly interesting book about the Hapsburg officer corps. This was essentially the only trans-ethnic, trans-national, trans-confessional insitution in the later Hapsburg state (1850s-1918), and consequently, knowledge of the officer corps is a key to understanding the later Hapsburg state. In this relatively short book, Deak uses a hybrid approach. There is conventional narrative about the evolution of the officer corp from the Revolutions of 1848-1849 to the post-WWI period but also a sociological analysis based on a sample of officers compiled by Deak from the careful records left by army bureaucrats. Deak provides data on the class, ethnic, and confessional origins of the officer corps, its education, the type of career typical of the officer corp (fairly boring, as this was mostly a peaceful period) and the role of the officer corps in the Hapsburg state. The sociological analysis is complemented by Deak's extensive use of memoirs and similar documents to flesh out the data provided by sociological analysis. In contrast to several other reviewers, I feel that this is an effective approach. Given Deak's goal of studying the nature and role of the officer corps, the sociological data is crucial, and if anything, I think that Deak could have done more detailed and informative analyses.

Deak provides some background history and then discusses the army as it developed after the Revolutions of 1848, when a series of reforms produced the army that would fight the subsequent Hapsburg wars. The army saved the Hapsburg monarchy in 1848-1849, and its key role was to be police force of last resort for the remaining decades of the empire. Following the defeats by the French in 1958 and the Prussians in 1866, this was essentially the only role for the army until the outbreak of WWI, for which the Hapsburg army was not prepared particularly well. Deak provides an interesting discussion of the nature of the officer corps. Following the major mid-century reforms, officers were often the sons of officers, received education in military boarding schools, and inculcated with loyalty to the Crown. As both a survival of feudal traditions and as a token of the basis of the monarchy, officers took a personal oath of loyalty to the Crown, administered directly by Francis Joseph himself. Overall, the ethos of the officer corps was relatively tolerant with respect to ethnicity and religion, a feature unique in the complicated politics and tensions of the empire. Francis Joseph set the tone for the officer corps. He cared only about the performance of duties and loyalty to the crown and was largely indifferent to the ethnicity, class origins, and religion of his officers. Deak's discussions reveal some very interesting features of the monarchy. One is the increasingly middle class character of the officer corps by the end of the 19th century. This reflected the increasing professionalization of military service and requirements for greater education. Unlike most other European armies, Jews were serving officers, including general officers. In 1900, almost 20% of reserve officers, chosen from the educated middle classes, were Jews. In the German Army, in contrast, there were no Jewish reserve officers, despite the high representation of Jews in the German professional classes as a whole.

Deak concludes with concise chapters on the Hapsburg army and officer corps during and after WWI. This is useful because of the relatively sparse English language literature on the Austro-Hungarian war effort. Deak presents some remarkable figures. Approximately one third of males in the empire served in the military, and casulty rates were horrific.
Berkohi
Much has already been written on this topic already. Deak adds nothing but his own opinionated propaganda.He tries to dazzle with his style, but fails to come up with any substance. Even his style is a bit antiquated and jaundiced. Reading this drivel was like feasting on a stale, cheap cake
which refused to go away. He stubbornly refuses to credit
women, minorities and queers for the sizeable contributions
they made to Habsburg culture. A hidden agenda? One must wonder. After the horrors of recent European history, we can only hope a more honest, balanced account will come soon.
Frosha
This is an interesting book on the Habsburg officer corps and its role within the Austro-Hungarian Army, state politics and the social structure of the empire. However, Mr. Deak bombards the reader with statistics and charts, while intersting and helpful, are not effectively worked into the study and would be difficult for anyone not already familiar with the subject to digest. Subsequently, the books effectiveness is seriously curtailed. Some conclusions are debatable and some also seem to be a matter of personal opinion. If nothing else, this book gives a good sense of the basic structure of the Habsburg Officer corps.
Bumand
This excellent study by one of this country's leading historians of East Central Europe provides a key to understanding the fascinating and complex multi-national Habsburg monarchy through a close look at one of the very few institutions that held this sprawling empire together -- its army officer corps. Deak's social and political analysis of this group is as entertaining as it is insightful, and demonstrates a interpretative approach that could prove fruitful for historians of other countries as well. The book is certainly of interest to military historians, but its real audience is much, much broader than that.
Use_Death
Upon reading this book a second time, in light of the persuasive comments left by the other reviewers, I must agree that Deak's work leaves an awful lot to be desired. I recently read other books on the same subject, notably Wendell Gibson's _Hapsburg Diary_, which makes Deak's work seem amateurish to say the least. I recant my earlier review, which was a product of my own ignorance. I hope I didn't lead anyone to actually purchasing Mr. Deak's infantile ramblings.
Mbon
Frankly, I do not understand why Mr. Deak continues to torture us with his inane blatherings on the subject of the Habsburg family. When was the last time a Habsburg accomplished anything of any import, like leading the NBA in rebounds or producing a really cool MTV video? I'm sure that the only people interested in the subject are more boring than Deak's book, if that is possible. Two thumbs down
Hapsburg military history is usually quite interesting,
but in Deak's hands it is reduced to bland statistics and
dry analysis. Hopefully, a better book will come along so interested readers will not feel compelled to suffer the boredom of Deak's style.