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ISBN:0822343312
Author: Catherine Porter,Patrick Weil
ISBN13: 978-0822343318
Title: How to Be French: Nationality in the Making since 1789
Format: lrf txt mbr rtf
ePUB size: 1949 kb
FB2 size: 1628 kb
DJVU size: 1752 kb
Language: English
Category: Humanities
Publisher: Duke University Press Books (December 15, 2008)
Pages: 456

How to Be French: Nationality in the Making since 1789 by Catherine Porter,Patrick Weil



Patrick Weil, Catherine Porter. Broadly comparative history of French nationality, from the French Revolution to the present, tying the politics of nationality to those of demography, colonial history, immigration, and conscription. How to Be French: Nationality in the Making since 1789 Patrick Weil Duke University Press Durham and London 2008 . Translated by Catherine Porter.

French nationality in practice. Personal Name: Porter, Catherine, 1941-. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book How to be French : nationality in the making since 1789, Patrick Weil ; translated by Catherine Porter.

How to Be French is a magisterial history of French nationality law from 1789 to the present, written by Patrick Weil, one of France’s foremost historians. First published in France in 2002, it is filled with captivating human dramas, with legal professionals, and with statesmen including La Fayette, Napoleon, Clemenceau, de Gaulle, and Chirac. France has long pioneered na How to Be French is a magisterial history of French nationality law from 1789 to the present, written by Patrick Weil, one of France’s foremost historians

How to Be French is a pioneering study of the fabrication of official ‘Frenchness’ since the Revolution of 1789, marshaling a plethora of fresh evidence and rereading more familiar sources in the service of an original, thoughtful, and provocative analysis. Patrick Weil is the most knowledgeable and insightful student of the institutional and judicial character of the French social tissue-of the political construction of cohesion in a land of immigration. How to be French is a critical history of nationality law and politics that illuminates decisive moments in the making of French nationality while making new and sophisticated theoretical claims about the articulations of nationality, the state, and history itself.

Reproducing the French Race: Immigration, Intimacy, and Embodiment in the Early Twentieth Century. Durham, NC and London: Duke University Press, 2009. Pp. xii + 228. £1. 9. Article in Journal of European Studies 40(3):287-288 · August 2010 with 3 Reads. Cite this publication. Do you want to read the rest of this article?

In how to be French Patrick Weil argues that this debate has not just been raging since the 1980s, ‘when it became clear that the great majority of immigrants from France’s former empire. would be settling permanently in France’ (Weil, What it means to be French, 2008:1) but has been a focus of the evolution of French immigration and nationality.

How to Be French: Nationality in the Making since 1789. Author(s): Patrick Weil. Translator(s): Catherine Porter. In How to Be French, Patrick Weil has produced an admirable book. He as also written a very important book, one which will serve as the standard work of reference on issues relating to French nationality for some years. His scholarship is a model of clarity and his judgments are never less than wise and well-informed. Jeremy Jennings, Journal of Law and Society. This is a stupendous achievement by one of the most important French scholars and public intellectuals writing today.

By Patrick Weil (trans. Weil's book, deftly translated by Catherine Porter, constitutes not only the definitive work on the history of French nationality laws but also a study that by any standards ranks as an outstanding piece of scholarship

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How to Be French is a magisterial history of French nationality law from 1789 to the present, written by Patrick Weil, one of France’s foremost historians. First published in France in 2002, it is filled with captivating human dramas, with legal professionals, and with statesmen including La Fayette, Napoleon, Clemenceau, de Gaulle, and Chirac. France has long pioneered nationality policies. It was France that first made the parent’s nationality the child’s birthright, regardless of whether the child is born on national soil, and France has changed its nationality laws more often and more significantly than any other modern democratic nation. Focusing on the political and legal confrontations that policies governing French nationality have continually evoked and the laws that have resulted, Weil teases out the rationales of lawmakers and jurists. In so doing, he definitively separates nationality from national identity. He demonstrates that nationality laws are written not to realize lofty conceptions of the nation but to address specific issues such as the autonomy of the individual in relation to the state or a sudden decline in population.

Throughout How to Be French, Weil compares French laws to those of other countries, including the United States, Great Britain, and Germany, showing how France both borrowed from and influenced other nations’ legislation. Examining moments when a racist approach to nationality policy held sway, Weil brings to light the Vichy regime’s denaturalization of thousands of citizens, primarily Jews and anti-fascist exiles, and late-twentieth-century efforts to deny North African immigrants and their children access to French nationality. He also reveals stark gender inequities in nationality policy, including the fact that until 1927 French women lost their citizenship by marrying foreign men. More than the first complete, systematic study of the evolution of French nationality policy, How to be French is a major contribution to the broader study of nationality.