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Download Medic!: The story of a Conscientious Objector in the Vietnam War epub book
ISBN:0595254209
Author: Ben Sherman
ISBN13: 978-0595254200
Title: Medic!: The story of a Conscientious Objector in the Vietnam War
Format: azw rtf mbr lrf
ePUB size: 1191 kb
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Language: English
Category: Humanities
Publisher: iUniverse (November 25, 2002)
Pages: 284

Medic!: The story of a Conscientious Objector in the Vietnam War by Ben Sherman



This book was so much more than a story about a conscientious objector. He typified the "every man", while telling a very rare story - one of t This book will always hold a special place with me. I especially loved the ending and what it really means to write a memoir of Vietnam. This quote from the graphic novel Watchmen is very applicable: As I come to understand Vietnam and what it implies about the human condition, I also realize that few humans will permit themselves such an understanding. This book was so much more than a story about a conscientious objector.

1. Interview - Ben Sherman - Medic! The Story of a Conscientious Objector in the Vietnam War. Published: 11 years ago. Duration: 37:37 Download. Bellingham, MA resident Bill Vicini joined the Air Force in 1964 and served in Vietnam in the Field Maintenance Squadron with the. 16. Griffin Vietnam War veteran Natick Veterans Oral History Project.

2. You may apply for Conscientious Objector status by filling out a Form 150 (enclosed) and sending it to your Selective Service Board. 3. By reading, you can see that you are required to write an essay about your reasons, the religious nature of your beliefs, the development of those beliefs since early childhood, and any public or private expressions of your pacifism. The cover of the book is pure crap. But it is nothing like the cover leads you to think.

An amazing book with an ending that made my jaw drop. A vivid glimpse into the experience of a human mind in the Vietnam War. -Andrew Wakeling, 18 I'd like to see this read in high school history classes covering the Vietnam War period, read by young men AND young women. Ginny Wakeling, his Mom I don’t usually read books outside school, but I couldn’t put this one down. My dad and I need to talk. Ryan Forest, 19 This guy got it right. I was a medic too. Yes, my son and I need to have the talk I’ve been avoiding for thirty years

The Story of a Conscientious Objector in the Vietnam War. by Ben Sherman. Select Format: Hardcover. In 1968, Ben Sherman objected to serving as a soldier in Vietnam, but chose to become a medic. ISBN13:9780595651627. Release Date:January 2002.

The Story of a Conscientious Objector in the Vietnam War. Category: 1950 – Present Military History.

In August 1968, Ben Sherman- then an eighteen year old college sophomore - was drafted, yet another Midwestern boy called to serve his country in the rice paddies of Vietnam. After his attempt at conscientious objector status was refused by the draft board, Sherman distinguished himself almost immediately upon entering the military: he refused to fire a weapon. Instead, he told his superior officers that he was willing to serve in any capacity that would not require him to carry a gun. Within a few short weeks he found himself in swamps of Vietnam, working as a combat medic

Gary Beikirch, Medal of Honor, Vietnam War. MedalOfHonorBook. Colonel (Ret) Bob Waggoner Vietnam War POW Interview. Interview with William H. Phillips, Vietnam War veteran. Vietnam: Combat Veterans Stories. Broome County STOP-DWI. KHE SANH: a walk in the clouds PART II. David Kniess. The Quiet Mutiny (1970) vietnam interviews part 2. MadMax2k2. Vietnam War, 1970: CBS camera rolls as platoon comes under. Not forgotten 1 of 5. learnhistory2.

“An amazing book with an ending that made my jaw drop. A vivid glimpse into the experience of a human mind in the Vietnam War.” —Andrew Wakeling, 18 “I'd like to see this read in high school history classes covering the Vietnam War period, read by young men AND young women.” —Ginny Wakeling, his Mom “I don’t usually read books outside school, but I couldn’t put this one down. My dad and I need to talk.” —Ryan Forest, 19 “This guy got it right. I know. I was a medic too. Yes, my son and I need to have the talk I’ve been avoiding for thirty years.” —Don Forest, his Dad “Everyone who has registered in the Selective Service should read this book. I also found that my mother (48 years old) liked the book a lot. Maybe it shouldn’t only be targeted at just men.” —Angela Lopez
Reviews: 7
SadLendy
This is the second time I i have read this book. As the years have gone buy I sometimes forget what I have read about Vietnam and what I haven't. Having served as a Conscientious Objector infantry combat medic myself in Vietnam in 1970 I decided to give this one another read. I had forgotten much of it but as I read it again I realized that this was not the first time. The book is well written and is an extremely interesting read. However, as others have commented, there is much that is at times difficult to believe, perhaps not because it didn't happen, but perhaps because of the way the story is told or because of the literary license that has been taken meaning that maybe it didn't quite happen the way he explains it. As I have detailed in my own book about Vietnam, Unlikely Warrior, Memoirs of a Vietnam Combat Medic, every man's experience in war is uniquely his own, and Ben Sherman certainly had a unique experience that was undoubtedly unlike any others. That is part of what makes it in someways a bit difficult to believe. At the same time, it is his story and who am I to question his reality.
As one who served eight months with an infantry platoon, when the standard was six months, I found particularly distasteful the fact that Ben Sherman took the first opportunity he could to get out of Vietnam under genuinely false pretenses because to do otherwise would result in his being sent to a unit where he might once again have to go to the field of battle.(Just after two weeks in the field and going through a major battle from which my platoon barely escaped after loosing four men and having two wounded, I was given the opportunity to get out of the field to work in the aid station, but feeling a responsibility to my men, I declined the opportunity.) This caused me to seriously questions the real root of his Conscientious Objector convictions and of his commitment to serve his country, even as a C.O.. No doubt he was committed to not killing anyone and I have to admire the extremes that he went to in order to finally get the Army to recognize his status and I have difficulty understanding why his draft board failed to give him that status in the first place, unless they somehow detected a lack of genuineness in his application. After all, though Mr. Sherman had the assistance of a Campus Chaplain and others to help him prepare his application for C.O. status, there seems to be little evidence, by his own testimony, of much in the way of genuine religious conviction.
I also found it extremely disconcerting that in his one experience as a field medic with an infantry unit in his first case of treating a battle wound he failed to check for an exit wound, despite of the fact that he had graduated at the top of his class, resulting perhaps, in the death of the injured soldier. I have to commend Mr. Sherman for his honesty in this respect, but it still astounds me. I did not graduate at the top of my class,but I certainly had the sense when a man was shot to look for an exit wound. This was standard practice taught to us in medics training.
Once again, the book is well written and a very interesting read, but left an extremely bat taste in my mouth. It will certainly appeal, as the reviews already show, to those who tend to hate all things pertaining to war, and see the military machine as purely evil, but will tend to create a bit of a bad taste in the mouth of those who have been there and served their full time loyally in spite of the difficulties they face.
Quemal
A well written book about his time served in Viet Nam from a slightly different angle. Held my attention to the very end. Very interesting and well worth adding to your library.
Grarana
Good book almost to the end,
RED
I've read a dozen of these type of war memoars and the writing of this one is on par with Philip Caputo's "A Rumor of War."
Dead Samurai
Bear with me, I am not a writer.
Do not buy this book.
I was a conscientious objector who served as a medic in Vietnam. All C.O.'s who served in Vietnam carried no weapon and were NOT restricted from being in combat - which apparently was news to Sherman and his congressman. Two C.O. medics in Vietnam received the Medal Of Honor. Posthumously.
The cover of the book is pure crap. From Sherman's rambling account it is not easy to determine exactly how many days he served in combat on the ground, or in a Huey. But it is nothing like the cover leads you to think.
One patrol of 3 or 4 days; one medevac Huey ride; one day on the ground after falling out of the Huey; one day working in an evac hospital's E.R.; time in an air-conditioned clinic aboard a river boat; and a good bit of time working as an office clerk. Sherman's total "combat tour" was 100 days long - then he typed his own name onto a manifest to get himself onto a plane home....displacing a soldier who had at least 10 months in Vietnam.
After 100 days in Vietnam - where did Sherman finish his 12 month combat tour?? 8 months in Hawaii !!!
The Rollers of Vildar
This book was great. A real fun read. Worth every penny.
Jode
I cannot believe this guy. What a whiner. I wasted my money on this inadequate human Period.
Just finished reading "Medic!" by Ben Sherman. All those memories came rushing back! Wounded and dead soldiers, the shock at the sudden violence and the smell of the mangled bodies will never be forgotten by those who saw them. At the end of his book Sherman tells of the rocket hitting on that fateful day in late July 1969 ,as the amassed 9th Infantry Division soldiers were about to board their "Freedom Bird" back to the "States" and the havoc it wreaked. I was a surgeon at the 3rd Field Hospital in Saigon and treated some of those wounded soldiers. What an emotion producing connection for me to read so many years later! My medical company in the 25th Infantry Division in Tay Ninh had many conscientious objectors as medics and no finer medics ever served. Thank you Ben Sherman for your story, and thank your for your efforts to save our soldiers.
Rick Snider, author of "Delta Six, Soldier Surgeon".