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ISBN:0878163387
Author: Alan Moore
ISBN13: 978-0878163380
Title: From Hell: Being a Melodrama in Sixteen Parts, Vol. 7
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ePUB size: 1833 kb
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Language: English
Category: Humanities
Publisher: Kitchen Sink Pr (April 1, 1995)
Pages: 8

From Hell: Being a Melodrama in Sixteen Parts, Vol. 7 by Alan Moore



No current Talk conversations about this book. Osa 4, ; by Alan Moore.

OSU, OSU OCL DPL. Personal Name: Moore, Alan, 1953-. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book From hell : being a melodrama in sixteen parts, Alan Moore, writer ; Eddie Campbell, artist ; Pete Mullins, contributing artist.

Being a Melodrama in Sixteen Parts, Vol. 7. by Alan Moore. Published April 1995 by Kitchen Sink Press. Comic books, strips, Horror comic books, strips, Serial murders, History, Graphic novels.

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This study guide consists of approx. 52 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more – everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of From Hell: Being a Melodrama in Sixteen Parts. This detailed literature summary also contains Topics for Discussion and a Free Quiz on From Hell: Being a Melodrama in Sixteen Parts by Alan Moore.

Alan Moore is widely considered to be the greatest comic book writer of all time  . Библиографические данные. Alan Moore, Eddie Campbell, Pete Mullins.

From Hell: Being a Melodrama in Sixteen Parts, Vol. 4: ISBN 9780878162703 (978-0-87816-270-3) Softcover, Kitchen Sink Pr, 1994. Swamp Thing: A Murder of Crows: v. 4 (Swamp Thing). by Alan Moore, Steve Bissette, John Totleben. Founded in 1997, BookFinder. Coauthors & Alternates.

Alan Moore (Watchmen) and Eddie Campbell (Bacchus), grandmasters of the comics medium, present a book often ranked among the greatest graphic novels of all time: From Hell. Two master storytellers. Eleven unsolved murders. A hundred years of mystery. One sprawling conspiracy, one metropolis on the brink of the twentieth century, one bloody-minded Ripper ushering London into the modern age of terror, and one comics masterpiece.

Alan Moore is widely regarded as the best and most influential writer in the history of comics. His seminal works include Miracleman and Watchmen, for which he won the coveted Hugo Award. Never one to limit himself in form or content, Moore has also published novels, Voice of the Fire and Jerusalem, and an epic poem, The Mirror of Love. Four of his ground-breaking graphic novels-From Hell, Watchmen, V for Vendetta, and The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen-have been adapted to the silver screen. Moore currently resides in Northampton, England.

Graphic novel
Reviews: 2
Riavay
"This is the place
where the world ended,
here in this mean ground-floor flat
just off Dorset Street,
more than a century agao.
This is the bed, and the knife, and the candle stub.
This is the rag that nung
over the window.
This is the kettle that melted to slag on the hearth.
This is the woman, and this is the man.
On this night. In this room.
After that, only fire. Only ritual."
Volume Seven of "From Hell: Being a Melodrama in Sixteen Parts" by writer Alan Moore and artist Eddie Campbell contains only one part of the award-winning Jack the Ripper graphic novel (there are ten volumes in all). "Chapter Ten: The Best of All Tailors" covers the murder of murder of Mary Jane Kelly (A.K.A.. Marie Jeanette Kelly, Mary Ann Kelly, Ginger) at 13 Miller's Court on the night of November 9, 1888. The title of the chapter comes from a rhyme that was reported to be the favorite rhyme of William Withey Gull, the physician that Moore casts as Jack the Ripper in this narrative: "If I were a tailor I'd make it my pride / The best of all tailors to be / And if I were a tinker, no tinker beside / Should mend an old kettle like me."
The point Moore makes with the title is, of course, ironic, for the murder of Mary Kelly is considered the last of the recognized Ripper killings (the exact number of victims is in dispute among fervent Ripperologists) and was unique in that it was committed inside the small room where Kelly lived. Because he was not outside where he could be interrupted, as was believed to have happen with Elizabeth Stride on September 30, the Ripper was able to engage in mutilations beyond the scope of what he had done with his prostitute victims to date. In fact, one of the reasons Mary Kelly's murder was assumed to be the last by Jack the Ripper is that it was seen as the climax of his escalating mutilation of his victims. Consequently, Moore's point would be that this was the Ripper's grotesque masterpiece representing his horrific "best." There is an additional irony in that the rhyme mentions a kettle and the cover art for Volume Eight of "From Hell" pictures the melted kettle they found in the fireplace of Kelly's room.
Throughout the "From Hell" series Moore provides an Appendix at the back of each volume in which he notes his supporting evidence and the dramatic liberties he has taken in constructing his narrative argument. There are also some fanciful elements to the story, but they do little to mitigate the horror of what is being depicted. But for this chapter he finds such notes "almost unnecessary, given the singular and specific nature of the event described and the relatively brief span of time over which the said event took place." Moore admits speculation on the order of the mutilation but notes the existing evidence and spends most of his time explaining his trails of thought that led him to depict the murder in this particular fashion.
Moore also points out that the depiction here is a close as he can get to a portrayal of what might have happened on that night, not only in that room but in the Ripper's mind, and that he certainly does not want to get any closer. "The Best of All Tailors" is the bloodiest chapter of "From Hell" and if this was a movie it would be NC-17 (the film adaptation of "From Hell" spared us the graphic details of Kelly's murder, even stopping the description of the police surgeon before it gets to the part that would give you nightmares for a week.
Through deduction, induction and abduction, Moore creates a compelling story and the fact that it is not what really happens has little to do with how much we enjoy "From Hell." Do I believe that Sir William Gull was indeed Jack the Ripper? No, I do not. I have heard many theories regarding his true identity that have been plausible, at least at face value, and I am more than willing to lead it to the knowledgeable experts to argue out their respective merits. But I was not reading "From Hell" to be convinced of the guilty or innocence of any one regarding the world's first infamous serial killer. I read it because as we have known ever since Alan Moore did his own take on the Swamp Thing, one of his greatest strengths as a writer is to make us look at old things in new ways.
Lilegha
I am not sure why the rest of these reviews deal with a different book than what is listed above, "From Hell: Being a Melodrama in Sixteen Parts," the graphic novel about Jack the Ripper written by Alan Moore and illustrated by Eddie Campbell. Granted, we will never know the "truth" about Jack. After all, scholars cannot even agree on exactly who he killed, which you would think was a rather important starting point in constructing any sort of theory, checking alibis, and such. All that matters from a narrative standpoint is whether "From Hell" tells a compelling story. By that standard, "From Hell" certainly succeeds.

In the Appendix to each chapter Moore careful details his sources, alterations and inventions for "From Hell" on a page-by-page basis. While such elaborations will only serve to infuriate most scholars of the Ripper, they are certainly of interest to us poor neophytes who cannot help but be fascinated by the details of the unsolvable mystery. Moore is working primarily off of Stephen Knight's "Jack the Riper: The Final Solution," which advances what Casebook: Jack the Ripper (the world's largest on-line public repository of Ripper-related information) labels the most controversial Ripper theory. Known as the Royal Conspiracy theory, it does have the delicious quality of involving virtually every person who has ever been a Ripper suspect. Despite its popularity, Ripperologists pretty much universally dismiss the theory (it ranks 8th on their list, mainly because one-third rated it 10 and another one-third rated it 1). But then the most popular suspect is currently James Maybrick, brought into prominence by the "Diary of Jack the Ripper" hoax (ah, but was it really?). Given everything that is out there, it is no wonder that the most "legitimate" suspect of the day, Francis Tumblety, gets lost. But all of this just reinforces the idea that "From Hell" is not history, but rather drama. Time and time again, it is the rationale of the STORY rather than the FACTS that drive Moore's narrative.

The artwork by Eddie Campbell, aided and abetted at various times by April Post and Pete Mullins, is certainly evocative of the tale. I even think there is a point at which the reader has to be grateful that the bloodier episodes are rendered in stark black and white drawings. Campbell presents various styles at different times in the narrative, altering it to match the narrative. But it is Moore's epic story that captivates throughout as he puts his giant jigsaw puzzle together from all the evidence and his own speculations. When Moore works in the conception of Adolf Hitler, which happened in Austria around the time of the murders, as an ironic counterpart to his narrative, it is hard not to be impressed, just as we are horrified by the clinical details of the Ripper's murder of Mary Jane Kelly, which takes up all of Chapter 10. Through deduction, induction and abduction, Moore creates a compelling story and the fact that it is not what really happens has little to do with how much we enjoy "From Hell."

Do I believe that Sir William Gull was indeed Jack the Ripper? No, I do not. I have heard many theories regarding his true identity that have been plausible, at least at face value (e.g., Patricia Cornwell's case for the artist Walter Richard Sickert in "Portrait of a Killer: Jack the Riper, Case Closed"), and I am more than willing to leave it to the knowledgeable experts to argue out their respective merits. But I was not reading "From Hell" to be convinced of the guilty or innocence of any one regarding the world's first infamous serial killer. I read it because as we have known ever since Alan Moore did his own take on the Swamp Thing, one of his greatest strengths as a writer is to make us look at old things in new ways. We will have a reminder of his originality soon enough when "V for Vendetta" hits the big screen next year.