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ISBN:0748641122
Author: Andrew Sanders
ISBN13: 978-0748641123
Title: Inside the IRA: Dissident Republicans and the War for Legitimacy
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ePUB size: 1799 kb
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Language: English
Category: Humanities
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press; 1 edition (April 25, 2011)
Pages: 288

Inside the IRA: Dissident Republicans and the War for Legitimacy by Andrew Sanders



Andrew Sanders explains how and why the IRA became several IRAs, analysing all the dissident factions that have emerged since the outbreak of the Troubles. The book includes extensive archival evidence and exclusive interviews with members of all dissident and mainstream republican organizations, all loyalist factions, and security force sources. Dublin author Brendan Behan once quipped that the first item on the agenda of any new Irish organisation was the split

Inside the IRA triumphs in its attempts to provide a consistent narrative and analysis of what is a complex and often controversial era of history. This book succeeds in providing a solid foundation and broad overview to the Republican movement and places this into a broader context with the internal situation inNorthern Ireland, particularly with the British involvement and the actions of the Loyalist paramilitaries. However, without appearing to be overtly critical, it is a truly thankless task producing a totally integrated work.

Would the 'real' IRA please stand up? Why, and how, the IRA splintered  . The Real IRA, the Continuity IRA, the Irish National Liberation Army, the Official IRA and the Provisional IRA have all assumed responsibility for the struggle for Irish freedom over the course of the late-20th century. Yet as recently as 1969 there was only one Irish Republican Army trying to unify Ir Would the 'real' IRA please stand up? Why, and how, the IRA splintered

Published by: Edinburgh University Press. This book focuses on the issue of republican splits, which created the Provisional and Official republican movements, and the subsequent development of those movements. eISBN: 978-0-7486-4604-3. Subjects: Political Science.

Inside the IRA: Dissident. has been added to your Basket. This book is based on a P. thesis that Andrew Sanders completed in 2008. And as well as discussing the Provisional IRA and its offshoots, the author looks at other paramilitary organizations,.

The Real IRA, the Continuity IRA, the Irish National Liberation Army, the Official IRA and the Provisional IRA have all assumed responsibility for the struggle for Irish freedom over the course of the late-20th century. Yet as recently as 1969 there was only one Irish Republican Army trying to unify Ireland using physical force. Andrew Sanders explains how and why the transition from one IRA to several IRAs occurred, analysing all the dissident factions that have emerged since the outbreak of the Northern Ireland troubles. He looks at why these groups emerged, what their respective purposes.

Times of Troubles: Britain’s War in Northern Ireland. Andrew Sanders and Ian S. Wood (2012). Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. Inside the IRA: Dissident Republicans and the War for Legitimacy. Andrew Sanders (2011).

He looks at why these groups emerged, what their respective purposes are, and why, in an era of relative peace and stability in Northern Ireland, they seek to prolong the violence that cost over 3500 lives.

Inside the IRA. Dissident Republicans and the War for Legitimacy. He looks at why these groups emerged, what their respective purposes are, and why, in an era of relative peace and stability in Northern Ireland, they seek to prolong the violence that cost over 3500 lives. Exclusive interviews with members of all dissident and mainstream republican organizations, all loyalist factions and security force sources.

Would the 'real' IRA please stand up? Why, and how, the IRA splintered. The Real IRA, the Continuity IRA, the Irish National Liberation Army, the Official IRA and the Provisional IRA have all assumed responsibility for the struggle for Irish freedom over the course of the late-20th century. Yet as recently as 1969 there was only one Irish Republican Army trying to unify Ireland using physical force., Andrew Sanders explains how and why the transition from one IRA to several IRAs occurred, analysing all the dissident factions that have emerged since the outbreak of the Northern Ireland troubles. He looks at why these groups emerged, what their respective purposes are, and why, in an era of relative peace and stability in Northern Ireland, they seek to prolong the violence that cost over 3500 lives.
Reviews: 2
Innadril
I rated this book as high as possible because it a well-done book,and very interesting and educating issue for the people interested in this theme
*Nameless*
This book is based on a Ph.D. thesis that Andrew Sanders completed in 2008. When I ordered my copy of the book, I wrongly assumed, from its subtitle, that it was primarily about the emergence of relatively new paramilitary groups as a result of fissures within Sinn Féin and the Provisional IRA. However, its historical scope is wider, as indicated by the title of the first chapter ('The Origins of Division: The Republican Movement in the Twentieth Century, 1916-62'). And as well as discussing the Provisional IRA and its offshoots, the author looks at other paramilitary organizations, including those on the loyalist side.

The eight chapters follow a logical historical progression through to the present century; and they're preceded, on pp. vi-vii, by a useful list of abbreviations that occur in the book. However, the list isn't comprehensive: there are abbreviations in the main text that can't be found in the list.

But there are more serious problems. Some passages aren't clearly written. Time and again, I found myself having to re-read sentences, to try to make sense of them. The book is packed with quotations, but in many instances it isn't evident who's being quoted, unless one checks the endnotes. In places, Sanders mentions Irish republican organizations, committees, or publications that have, or had, Gaelic names (e.g. 'Clann na Poblachta'). It would have helped if he'd taken the trouble to provide English translations. (Even in Ireland itself, only a small proportion of the population is Gaelic speaking.) In referring to individuals, Sanders doesn't always specify their status adequately. On p. 52, for example, he quotes a republican called Marian Price, but without providing relevant biographical details. It's only later in the book that he indicates that she'd participated in Provisional IRA bomb attacks on London and had been imprisoned.

Despite its shortcomings, Sanders' book covers an important and turbulent period in British and Irish history, and it contains interesting information. Hopefully, if it goes to a further edition at some point, the aforementioned issues will be addressed and it will be more readable.