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ISBN:0297842625
Author: John Adamson
ISBN13: 978-0297842620
Title: The Noble Revolt: The Overthrow of Charles I
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ePUB size: 1820 kb
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Language: English
Category: Humanities
Publisher: Weidenfeld & Nicolson; 1 edition (March 3, 2009)
Pages: 768

The Noble Revolt: The Overthrow of Charles I by John Adamson



Personal Name: Charles I,, King of England, 1600-1649. Geographic Name: Great Britain History Civil War, 1642-1649. Geographic Name: Great Britain History Charles I, 1625-1649. Download The noble revolt : the overthrow of Charles I John Adamson. leave here couple of words about this book: Tags: Attitude control systems. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book The noble revolt : the overthrow of Charles I, John Adamson.

John Adamson’s The Noble Revolt asserts the crucial role of political ideas in the coming cataclysm of the English civil war. His focus is close: the 18 months before the final breach between Charles I and Parliament, but it is as scholarly in depth as it is cinematic in scope. Here is a dramatic retelling of a story we thought we knew well. A detailed history of the political crisis that led to the overthrow of King Charles I, it won the Samuel Pepys Award for the book that makes the greatest contribution to our knowledge of Pepys, his times, or his contemporaries. Unfortunately, it appears to only be out in the UK at the moment, but it's still high on my list of books to acquire.

John Adamson is a Fellow of Peterhouse, Cambridge, and has written extensively on sixteenth- and seventeenth-century political and cultural history. He is a winner of the Royal Historical Society's Alexander Prize and the University of Cambridge's Seeley Medal for History. Adamson tells the story of the events leading up to the Civil War in England, from Summer 1640 to January 1642, the Scots wars and following, when the Parliament wrested control of the country away from the King into its own hands. The title, The Noble Revolt, refers not to the "noble" character of the revolt but rather the leading role of a group of nobles in the House of Lords. This claim constitutes the originality of his book. The book is narrated almost like a detective novel, and it is a real page turner. He takes his time, examining exactly who did what and when and for what reasons.

The Noble Revolt: The Overthrow of Charles I. Authors: Adamson, John. We hope you enjoy your book and that it arrives quickly and is as expected. Read full description. A magnificent new study of the political crisis that produced the overthrow of King Charles I, and came to engulf all three Stuart kingdoms - England, Scotland, and Ireland - in war during the 1640s. John Adamson is a Fellow of Peterhouse, Cambridge, and has written extensively on sixteenth- and seventeenth-century political and cultural history.

Adamson argues that while these factors existed, the key years of the early 1640s (this book is very focused in scope and does not discuss the actual course of the Civil War at all) the struggle was between a group of nobles and their supporters and the king. It was about who had power in the political system. The book is persuasive, and while thick with detail, avoids getting bogged down in it and losing the bigger picture  . Library descriptions. A new study of the political crisis that produced the overthrow of King Charles I, and came to engulf all three Stuart kingdoms - England, Scotland, and Ireland - in war during the 1640s.

The Noble Revolt: The Overthrow of Charles I by John Adamson Weidenfeld, 742 pp, £2. 0, March 2007, ISBN 978 0 297 84262 0. Fifty years, almost to the month, before the publication of John Adamson’s book, Hugh Trevor-Roper stated his intention to write what he knew would be ‘a very long book’, the most ambitious of his career, on the Puritan revolution of 17th-century England. The project went through many mutations over the next four years, but by 1961 it was virtually complete.

The political thought of John Milton. Previous: The English People and the English Revolution. Library availability.

Simon Heffer: King V Parliament - The Noble Revolt: The Overthrow of Charles I by John Adamson. by John Adamson. 576 pp, Weidenfeld & Nicolson, £25. The year 1641 is one of English history's great turning-points. A bold group of disaffected peers has just petitioned King Charles for significant constitutional change, including the surrender of many of his prerogative rights, such as the appointment of senior officials and the raising of revenue through taxation. John Adamson's excellent book takes all the time it needs to set up the vastly complex web of influences. Quotations help to colour in the details of the picture, and provide a kind of immediacy - filled with rumour and doubt - that fixes us in the moment. This is no sleight of hand on Adamson's part, merely his reminder that the upheaval in Britain's power structures in these 20 remarkable months was far from inevitable.

The noble revolt is not only the best history book I've read in a long time, it's actually one of the best books of any kind I've read (2) in a long time. Adamson has achieved the almost incredible feat of writing a work of serious original historical scholarship that reads like a novel; so much so that I have no hesitation in recommending it to you even if you would never normally consider reading a book about early modern English political history

In the 1630s, King Charles I’s efforts to expand royal power caused alarm throughout the British Isles. In England, a small group of noblemen chose to risk their lives and fortunes to stop him. In a magnificent new study of the political crisis during the English Civil War, acclaimed historian John Adamson explores the brilliant strategy of the men who started a movement that would overthrow a king, set three kingdoms ablaze, and lead to a new religious and political order in mainland Britain. 

 

Reviews: 5
Yozshujind
A very detailed and insightful account drawn from period primary sources, well worth the effort of reading - and the color plates are spectacular.
Ohatollia
Adamson bodly goes where other fail to go. He dispells some of the present notions that the death of Charles I was all Charles' fault. Prooving a coup by Cromwell, Vane Warwick and others who were determined, especiially Cromwell, not to be satisfied with just gainin g control of the government but desposing of its monarch. This is a must read if you're researching Cromwell and the English Civil War.
Nkeiy
Adamson tells the story of the events leading up to the Civil War in England, from Summer 1640 to January 1642, the Scots wars and following, when the Parliament wrested control of the country away from the King into its own hands.

The title, The Noble Revolt, refers not to the "noble" character of the revolt but rather the leading role of a group of nobles in the House of Lords. He argues that a relatively small group of Parliamentary nobles were the moving, decisive force in the radical changes in government during this time period. This claim constitutes the originality of his book.

The book is narrated almost like a detective novel, and it is a real page turner. He takes his time, examining exactly who did what and when and for what reasons. Adamson avails himself of some newly available documentary evidence (diaries and so on) that provide a more convincing and detailed narrative than previous accounts.

His work is revisionary in the best sense, revising both recent and more traditional interpretations of events. In the last 35 years, revisionary historians, reacting against the whiggish (or Marxist), neo-Hegelian version, have emphasized the contingency of the Civil War, arguing that it wasn't until 1642 that the divisions that led to the Civil War became entrenched; but Adamson shows convincingly that serious divisions were already emerging during 1640-41. Adamson agrees that the Civil War was unplanned and not inevitable, but he pushes back its origins to the events of 1640-41 rather than 1642.

He also attempts to refute the traditional idea that the Civil War was a "war of religion," pitting Anglicans and crypto-Catholics against Presbyterians and Independents. Rather he claims that the conflict was really about the political structure of England, the relative roles of the Parliament, King, and Bishops. But this is a false dichotomy. And his own account of events doesn't really support it. The reason why the Warwick, Essex, and Bedford factions wanted to redefine the role of the monarch was because of Charles' refusal to reform the Church along Puritan lines. The underlying, long-term reason for the conflict was indeed fundamentally religious, and the conflict over the power of the king was entirely due to Charles' refusal of Protestant reform, his (and Laud's) insistence on bringing back quasi-Catholic forms of worship. Like so many others, Adamson overextends his thesis, for example by minimizing the popular support that the "noble revolt" enjoyed, as well as their fundamental religious motivation. True, as Adamson demonstrates, once they opposed themselves to the King, they were forced to make their own safety, and the safety of their political reforms, paramount, but this fact doesn't make their Puritan leanings any less important. Adamson also insists, repeatedly, on characterizing the Puritan nobles as "treasonous," as if this were some kind of self-evident fact; when King Charles would be more accurately described as treasonous in his betrayal and oppression of his own people.
SARAND
politicians using religion to their own political ends? hmm....sounds familiar??? this book was not only well researched but brilliantly written. not one boring moment. i was really rooting for old charles (warwick and bedford and pym ect were really unlikeable people) but he messed it up everytime. never trust anyone named suckling to orchastrate a jail break! adamson did an amazing job showing the convanenters role and collusion with the junto party and the different political goals at play creating a dizzying billiard ball affect. his analysis of the treason committed by the junto and the need to get rid of strafford was also brilliant. it is a long book, but really, not a problem it's that interesting. really, just overall brilliant, this book deserves more recognition, and not just from a grad student :) if you want a bottom view of what was happening at this time may i reccommend david cressy's england on edge? also well written, very interesting, lots of evidence, overall good read. my 2 favorite books on the events leading up to the civil war.
Hbr
Magnificent narrative history which develops a most interesting thesis about the nobility and the downfall of Charles I.