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ISBN:0521071771
Author: Efraim Shmueli,Gila Shmueli
ISBN13: 978-0521071772
Title: Seven Jewish Cultures: A Reinterpretation of Jewish History and Thought
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Language: English
Category: Humanities
Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (August 14, 2008)
Pages: 312

Seven Jewish Cultures: A Reinterpretation of Jewish History and Thought by Efraim Shmueli,Gila Shmueli



Shmueli, Ephraim, 1908-. Publication, Distribution, et. Cambridge ; New York. Cambridge University Press, (c)1990. Includes bibliographical references (p. -274) and index. Uncontrolled Related/Analytical Title: 7 Jewish cultures.

Shmueli argues that the cultures of modernity have created a new frame of reference for the Jewish people. No longer is Jewish history viewed as a divine drama, and no longer is the Bible seen as the hermeneutical key to all Jewish problems. Both in Israel and outside it, claims Shmueli, there is a need for a new balance that will retain the creative elements of the past and, at the same time, permit reinterpretation and change.

Bibliographic Citation. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1990. The Other in Jewish Thought and History: Constructions of Jewish Culture and Identity . Silberstein, Laurence J. and Cohn, Robert L. (1994). Related Items in Google Scholar. Весь DSpace Сообщества и коллекции Авторы Названия By Creation Date Эта коллекция Авторы Названия By Creation Date.

Seven Jewish Cultures: A Reinterpretation of Jewish History and Thought. Translated from the Hebrew by Gila Shmueli. Cambridge University Press, 1990. Pp. xviii + 293. No price. Centre for the Study of Judaism, Selly Oak, Birmingham.

Seven Jewish Cultures Efraim Shmueli, p. 177. "As the Geiger-Tiktin conflict resulted in establishing intracommunal institutional lines between Reform and Orthodox, so did it lead to a clarification of the theoretical differences between the two factions. In the first volumes of his scholarly periodical Geiger had begun to lay down the philosophy of Judaism. It was attacked by the champions of tradition and defended by Geiger's supporters. Seven Jewish cultures: a reinterpretation of Jewish history and thought Ephraim Shmueli, p. 168. .the immense authoritarian power of the orthodox Rabbis and Hasidic Zadikkim in the traditionalist communities. As a result, there was open conflict between the rebellious youth. Download as PDF. Printable version.

a b c d Shmueli, Efraim (1990) Seven Jewish cultures: a reinterpretation of Jewish history and thought Cambridge University Press, p. 123, 167-168, 172-174, 177, 261. ^ "Abraham Geiger. stressed the belief in progress: the Bible and Talmud represent an early, primitive stage in a revelation that is still continuing .

Jewish history is viewed as an unfolding of seven successive systems of cultures, where each culture emerges in its time both as a rebel and a successor of previous cultures. Each presents itself as a distinct and often startlingly different framework in which the meaning of Jewish life is always interpreted anew. In this sense, Jewish history may be said to have undergone seven great "Renaissances.

Seven Jewish Cultures : A Reinterpretation of Jewish History and Thought. Jewish history is viewed as an unfolding of seven successive systems of cultures, where each culture emerges in its time both as a rebel and a successor of previous cultures.

Professor Shmueli has synthesized history, philosophy, biblical scholarship, sociology, literature and psychology into an original and profound new view of Jewish history. Jewish history is viewed as an unfolding of seven successive systems of cultures, where each culture emerges in its time both as a rebel and a successor of previous cultures. Each presents itself as a distinct and often startlingly different framework in which the meaning of Jewish life is always interpreted anew. In this sense, Jewish history may be said to have undergone seven great "Renaissances." This study emphasizes the chasm that divides the five "cultures of faith" from the secular cultures of the Emancipation and nationalist-Israeli periods. Shmueli argues that the cultures of modernity have created a new frame of reference for the Jewish people. No longer is Jewish history viewed as a divine drama, and no longer is the Bible seen as the hermeneutical key to all Jewish problems. Both in Israel and outside it, claims Shmueli, there is a need for a new balance that will retain the creative elements of the past and, at the same time, permit reinterpretation and change.