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ISBN:0801894905
Author: Zachary M. Schrag
ISBN13: 978-0801894909
Title: Ethical Imperialism: Institutional Review Boards and the Social Sciences, 1965–2009
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ePUB size: 1832 kb
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Language: English
Category: Humanities
Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press; 1 edition (September 1, 2010)
Pages: 264

Ethical Imperialism: Institutional Review Boards and the Social Sciences, 1965–2009 by Zachary M. Schrag



Ethical Imperialism book. He explores the origins and the application of these regulations and analyzes how the rules-initially crafted to protect the health and privacy of the human subjects of medical experiments-can limit even casual scholarly interactions such as a humanist interviewing a poet about his or her writing.

However, his purpose is not simply to present the historical specificities of their emergence but to consider its relationship to the ongoing struggle over their role and remit in the ethical governance the social sciences.

By Zachary M. Schrag. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010.

The result is that university ethics panels routinely impede the work of scholars in those fields. Belmont s Ethical Malpractice, Bioethics Forum, 30 November 2010.

He explores the origins and the application of these regulations and analyzes how the rules―initially crafted to protect the health and privacy of the human subjects of medical experiments―can limit even casual scholarly interactions such as a humanist interviewing a poet about his or her writing.

Schrag, Zachary M. Bibliographic Citation. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010.

By Zachary M. Baltimore: The John Hopkins University Press, 2010. Second, he finds that IRB policy makers failed to consider contemporary alternatives within the social sciences to encourage the ethical behavior of their members and the protection of their participants. Third, he reveals a troubling lack of representation of social scientists within the various official bodies responsible for setting IRB policy

University researchers in the United States seeking to observe, survey, or interview people are required first to complete ethical training courses and to submit their proposals to an institutional review board (IRB). Under current rules, IRBs have the power to deny funding, degrees, or promotion if their recommended modifications to scholars’ proposals are not followed. This volume explains how this system of regulation arose and discusses its chilling effects on research in the social sciences and humanities.

Zachary M. Schrag draws on original research and interviews with the key shapers of the institutional review board regime to raise important points about the effect of the IRB process on scholarship. He explores the origins and the application of these regulations and analyzes how the rules―initially crafted to protect the health and privacy of the human subjects of medical experiments―can limit even casual scholarly interactions such as a humanist interviewing a poet about his or her writing. In assessing the issue, Schrag argues that biomedical researchers and bioethicists repeatedly excluded social scientists from rule making and ignored the existing ethical traditions in nonmedical fields. Ultimately, he contends, IRBs not only threaten to polarize medical and social scientists, they also create an atmosphere wherein certain types of academics can impede and even silence others.

The first work to document the troubled emergence of today's system of regulating scholarly research, Ethical Imperialism illuminates the problems caused by simple, universal rule making in academic and professional research. This short, smart analysis will engage scholars across academia.

Reviews: 4
Jube
This excellent book explains the origins of all the red tape social scientists and historians must endure thanks to the heavy hand of medical research as the model for IRB regulations. Well researched and persuasively argued! Give a copy to your vice provost for research!
Doukasa
Ethical Imperialism Zachary Schrag's historical analysis of the genesis of the Institutional Review Board in the Tuskegee Institute debacle is a must read. He digs into documents that reveal how the response to a biomedical research nightmare has warped the social sciences and even threatens their continuing existence. His book serves as a reminder that the unintended consequences of reform may outweigh its benefits.
Kelezel
As an IRB committee member, I found this book to be fascinating, engaging, and informative. If I could, I would make this required reading for IRBs across the United States.

Disclaimer: I have no relation to the author.
Velan
Today, most social researchers who do research with human subjects are obliged to learn the official history of IRBs through the NIH or CITI online research courses. The official history traces the IRB regulation of ethnographic and other social research, somewhat puzzlingly, to the abuses of the Tuskegee syphilis and Nazi twin experiments. Schrag's history, in contrast, shows in painstaking detail how a regulatory system designed for biomedical researchers was applied to social scientists with almost no participation or input from our disciplines. A must-read for academics concerned with human subjects regulation and academic freedom.