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ISBN:1557861838
Author: Alan L. Kolata
ISBN13: 978-1557861832
Title: The Tiwanaku: Portrait of an Andean Civilization
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Language: English
Category: Humanities
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell (December 8, 1993)
Pages: 336

The Tiwanaku: Portrait of an Andean Civilization by Alan L. Kolata



Many passages in the book provide extraordinary vignettes of this enigmatic people.

Andean civilization lacked several characteristics distinguishing it from the pristine civilizations in the Old World and from the Mesoamerican cultures. Instead, their societies used the quipu, a system of knotted and colored strings, to convey information. Kolata, Alan L. (1993). The Tiwanaku: Portrait of an Andean Civilization. ISBN 978-1-55786-183-2.

Kolata, Alan L. Publication, Distribution, et. Washington On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Tiwanaku and its hinterland : archaeology and paleoecology of an Andean civilization, Alan L. Kolata.

Start by marking The Tiwanaku: Portrait of an Andean Civilization as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. This book is an exploration of 3000 years of Tiwanakan history, from the first appearance of their settlement around the shores of Lake Titicaca to their contemporary descendants in the Andes. The author draws on archaeological evidence throughout the region, supplementing this with what can be drawn from later recorded myths and legends. He presents both a narration of Ti This book is an exploration of 3000 years of Tiwanakan history, from the first appearance of their settlement around the shores of Lake Titicaca to their contemporary descendants in the Andes.

Article in American Anthropologist 96(4):1030 - 1031 · October 2009 with 171 Reads. Cite this publication. Do you want to read the rest of this article? Request full-text.

ISBN: 978-1-557-86183-2 December 1993 Wiley-Blackwell 336 Pages. Professor Kolata was formerly Assistant Curator of the Field Museum of Natural History at the University of Chicago. 1. The Myth of Tiwanaku. 3. The Natural and Social Setting. 4. Tiwanaku Emergence. 5. Taypikala: The City at the Center. 6. Metropole and Hinterland. 7. The Empire Expands. 8. The Decline and Fall of Tiwanaku.

This book is an exploration of 3000 years of Tiwanakan history, from the first appearance of their settlement around the shores of Lake Titicaca to their. Home All Categories History Books Latin America History Books The Tiwanaku: Portrait of an Andean Civilization (Peoples of America). ISBN13: 9781557861832. The Tiwanaku : Portrait of an Andean Civilization.

Smithsonian Series in Archaeological Inquiry. Department of Archaeology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, CB2 3DZ, UK; [email protected] Published online: 01 February 2005.

Chicago: The Globalization Project, University of Chicago Center for Latin American Studies. 1997 "Climate Variation and the Rise and Fall of an Andean Civilization" (with . Binford, M. Brenner, M. Abbott, . Seddon & J. Curtis). Charlton, ed. The Archaeology of City States: Cross-Cultural Approaches. Smithsonian Institution Press, 245-254. 1993 The Tiwanaku: Portrait of an Andean Civilization. Oxford, UK and Cambridge, Mass: Basil Blackwell. 1993 Climate and Collapse: Agro-ecological Perspectives on the Decline of the Tiwanaku State (with Charles Ortloff) Journal of Archaeological Science, 20: 195-221.

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Reviews: 3
Beardana
The author breathes life into the ruins of Tiwanaku, a high altitude city and its suburbs near Lake Titicaca in Bolivia that flourished from 200 BC to 900 AD. It was a golden age legend suffused with spiritual power for the Inca at the time of the Conquest. Tiwanaku was the metropolitan epicenter of an advanced civilization whose "colonial" empire, in the form of a discontinuous `vertical archipelago,' spanned a variety of environments from the Pacific to the upper Amazon. Many passages in the book provide extraordinary vignettes of this enigmatic people.

The author is an archaeologist, but the context of his research project was an interdisciplinary collaboration with other scientists, experts, assistants, and students, both Bolivian and foreign. Among the most interesting to me are the experimental reconstructions that project members undertook. For example, they partially restored and grew native crops on several industrial scale agricultural structures, originally built by the ancients, known as "raised fields." These artifacts outwardly resemble enclosed, modular, rectangular mazes of water that surround peninsular strips of earth (p. 164). Sited along the irrigation canals like beads on a string, they produce their own fertilizer from the alga growing in their water. The raised fields function as passive solar collectors that accumulate sufficient heat during the day to enable crops such as potatoes and quinoa to withstand the hard freezes so frequent on the high Andean plains. This technology permits planting and harvesting two bountiful crops a year in an area whose fields ordinarily produce poorly. The raised fields were sophisticated units of productive capital investment, but were not the only factory-like facilities located near the city.

Good bibliography; greyscale illustrations (for color see Tiwanaku: Ancestors of the Inca); no glossary; lazy indexing.
Maman
The author appears more interested in impressing readers with arcane esoteric prose at the expense of educating non-professorial readers about Tinawaku. If you are interested in Tiwanaku, find another author.
Dalarin
Given the raft of weirdos who over the years have chosen Tiwanaku (Tiahuanaco) for their subject, it is a welcome addition to have a serious book by a real scientist who has actually excavated at the site for several years. Tiwanaku is a favorite focus for loonies ranging from the Von Daniken "extra terrestrials are responsible for all the great human achievements of the past" school to the New Age mystic Shirley Maclain's Out on a Limb [Out of your mind!] school. While not explicitly addressing the wacko theories, Kolata's book shows how, contrary to their implicit racism, the indigenous people of the Titicaca basin were more than ingenious enough to come up with ways to contruct major monuments, carve incredible fantastic stone sculptures, and make the high arid plain of the altiplano bloom with potatoes, tubers and quinoa. These people had indoor plumbing and public sewage systems 1500 years ago!

The Tiwanaku is a bit simplistic and general for the Andean or archaeological specialist; it is more appropriate for the first year University student or educated layman. Nonetheless, it brings together the current general state of knowledge about this important civilization in a highly readable fashion.