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ISBN:0756762588
Author: Ronald Takaki
ISBN13: 978-0756762582
Title: Double Victory: A Multicultural History of America in World War II
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ePUB size: 1715 kb
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Language: English
Category: Humanities
Publisher: Diane Pub Co (December 1, 2000)
Pages: 281

Double Victory: A Multicultural History of America in World War II by Ronald Takaki



For most Americans, World War II was a galvanizing experience, a blending of battlefield tenacity and heroism on foreign soil with unprecedented sacrifice and production on the home front, all in the name of freedom. It was this unified effort that Studs Terkel referred to when he labeled the world’s greatest global conflict the good war. For some Americans the Second World War was also a desperate fight against discrimination here at home–black intellectual . Dubois called it the War for Racial Equality

Personal Name: Takaki, Ronald . 1939-2009. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Double victory : a multicultural history of America in World War II, Ronald Takaki.

A History of Multicultural America. Except as permitted under the . Takaki’s book is nothing less than an attempt to a view all of American history from a multiculrual perspective. It is clearly not intended to divide American but rather to teach them to value the nations’ inescapable diversity. Double Victory: A Multicultural History of America in World War II. CONTENTS. 1 A Different Mirror: The Making of Multicultural America.

Acclaimed historian Ronald Takaki asserts that for many Americans, World War II was fought for a double victory : on the battlefront as well as on the home front. Takaki’s book Double Victory: A Multicultural History of America in World War II reminds the audience that there was much, much more happening at home and on the frontlines during World War II than in the battlefield. 1941 The United States is quiet and empty because they went off to fight in World War II. This Day March 14, 1943, I Louis Slotin currently a physicist part of the Los Alamos National Laboratory trying to help America during World War II. Today Rrobert Ooppenheimer had a big plan for me.

In Double Victory Ronald Takaki explores the contradictions presented by the rhetoric of the Second World War in America and challenges the concept of a ‘good war’. While the press and the government spoke of fighting for democracy abroad, in the US race riots, internment, and Jim Crow demonstrated that the battle for democracy was far from over on the home front. I really liked this book. It offered an entirely different view on World War Two that most people probably don't think that much about. World War II was the most significant event in the 20th century both on a foreign and domestic level for the United States. With the contribution of African Americans, Asians, Jewish and Europeans in the American military service directly correlates with the coming civil rights movements of the latter portion of the 20th century.

World War II was the most significant event in the 20th century both on a foreign and domestic level for the United States. During this war, Americans from every corner of the world spilled their blood for this nation and our ideals of human rights. military was a diverse conglomerate of men and beliefs; I enjoyed how Takiki portrays the importance of many in the war effort. This book tells the story of how Blacks, Japanese, Chinese, Native Americans, Jews and others living in America were discriminated against going into World War II in the United States. It is a well told and documented set of stories of unfair treatment, maintained through generally held public attitudes of distrust of foreigners.

us/10/127169 Content: Unabridged Written by: Ronald Takaki Narrated by: Edward Lewis Release date: 1/1/2007 Duration: 8 hrs 1 min Contact me for any question: nm45807l. Автовоспроизведение Если функция включена, то следующий ролик начнет воспроизводиться автоматически.

Double Victory : A Multicultural History of America in World War II. by Ronald Takaki. This is an extremely important and well-written book about what WWII meant for minority Americans. The war was a double-tragedy for most of them - shedding blood abroad and fighting vehement racism at home. Stories of Jewish-Americans unable to welcome refugees fleeing Nazism in Europe and Japanese-Americans shipped to Western US concentration camps are particularly gripping. Kudos for Ron Takaki for the great work -. Popular Categories.

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Until now, the story of America's role in World War II has been presented primarily through the lives of powerful policymakers and generals, or through the heroism of American soldiers of predominantly European ancestry. Historian Ronald Takaki's multicultural history offers a different perspective. In Double Victory, history is told through the lives of ordinary, ethnically diverse Americans - a Tuskegee pilot wanting to fly and fight for freedom, a Navajo code talker using his native language to transmit battle messages, a Mexican-American woman riveting B-29 bombers in an airplane factory, a Japanese American feeling betrayed by his own government, and a Jewish-American soldier at Buchenwald pressing human ashes into his palm so that he would never forget what he had seen.
Reviews: 7
Bedy
Although most Americans think of World War II as a two-front war--the Pacific theater and the European front--historian Ronald Takaki reminds us that there was a third, more insidious campaign--the struggle at home against "ugly prejudices" and violent oppression of ethnic minorities. While the Roosevelt administration touted the "Four Freedoms" for which Americans were fighting, those freedoms (freedom of speech and religion and freedom from want and fear) were still not fully extended to citizens, residents, and refugees.
In successive chapters, Takaki focuses on the abuses and injustices resulting from the exclusion of minority workers from defense industries, the Jim Crow statutes that segregated African Americans at home and in the army, the unemployment and poverty that greeted returning Native Americans veterans, the hostility towards Mexican Americans for the "zoot suits" worn by their youth, the laws prohibiting longtime Asian laborers from becoming citizens because they were not "white," the forced internment of Japanese Americans, the callousness that turned away Jewish refugees from our ports. He then examines the controversy surrounding the motivations for using the atomic bomb against civilian population centers.
Yet the author also reveals the many advances that the war delivered to ethnic groups. Minority communities contributed tens of thousands of soldiers who fought valiantly on the battlefront and earned the respect and friendship of their white compatriots. The shortage of domestic workers forced reluctant industries to hire non-white workers. A. Philip Randolph and his colleagues launched the civil rights movement by organizing a march on Washington, which was cancelled after Roosevelt signed executive order 8802, abolishing discrimination in government and defense jobs. (The order was largely symbolic, since it was hardly enforced, but in retrospect it was clearly a major first step.) And the sanguine final chapter demonstrates that, although the struggle for civil rights suffered setbacks during the next two decades, there really was no turning back.
Focusing one's attention on the domestic issues of the time, of course, does not minimize the contribution of our armed forces abroad; if anything, such a discussion emphasizes that the fight against prejudice was equally important: both because non-white citizens were serving our country and because our enemies used examples of American intolerance as propaganda against the U.S.--and because it was morally necessary. Although written by an academic, this concise book is both fascinating and approachable; it should be read by all Americans who care about freedom. It's a reminder of why we fought what Studs Terkel called "the Good War": the "double victory" of increasing liberty not only for Europeans and Asians but for every American as well.
Gabar
This is a great resource portraying the contribution of multiple ethnicities/minorities to the U.S. war effort in World War II. World War II was the most significant event in the 20th century both on a foreign and domestic level for the United States. With the contribution of African Americans, Asians, Jewish and Europeans in the American military service directly correlates with the coming civil rights movements of the latter portion of the 20th century. During this war, Americans from every corner of the world spilled their blood for this nation and our ideals of human rights. The U.S. military was a diverse conglomerate of men and beliefs; I enjoyed how Takiki portrays the importance of many in the war effort. It was a complicated era and the sacrifices of many would come to the surface in the changing face of domestic policies and civil rights. This book is a good resource to see the contributions of many to the American war effort. It notes the importance of wartime industry, family support and community support for the whole of America. I really enjoyed it for both school and personal reasons.
Wel
This book tells the story of how Blacks, Japanese, Chinese, Native Americans, Jews and others living in America were discriminated against going into World War II in the United States. It is a well told and documented set of stories of unfair treatment, maintained through generally held public attitudes of distrust of foreigners. It certainly opens the readers eyes about how far we have to go as a country of equality.
Fiarynara
This should be sold under political topic rather than military because it supposes a political question rather than speak of military information about the war
Vonalij
Takaki has an interesting take on minorities during World War II. There is a lot discussed about the Japanese, but also about African-Americans, who seem to less talked about during this time period, even though we are in the process of correcting this.
MeGa_NunC
Needed it for school. It was okay.
Darksinger
No complaints
I was impressed. .