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ISBN:0262113104
Author: Roger F. Malina PhD,Sean Cubitt,Susan Kozel
ISBN13: 978-0262113106
Title: Closer: Performance, Technologies, Phenomenology (Leonardo)
Format: lit mbr lrf docx
ePUB size: 1864 kb
FB2 size: 1405 kb
DJVU size: 1405 kb
Language: English
Category: Humanities
Publisher: The MIT Press (April 4, 2008)
Pages: 384

Closer: Performance, Technologies, Phenomenology (Leonardo) by Roger F. Malina PhD,Sean Cubitt,Susan Kozel



ISBN-13: 978-0262113106. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.

Performance, technologies, phenomenology susan kozel. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form by any electronic or mechanical means (including photocopying, recording, or information storage and retrieval) without permission in writing from the publisher. Designer: Rebeca Mendez, Rebeca Mendez Design (RMD). Assistant Designer and Production Design: Donnie Luu, RMD. This book was set by RMD in Gotham and Type Jockey. Closer : performance, technologies, phenomenology, Susan Kozel. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 978-0-262-11310-6 (hardcover : alk. paper).

This book draws together three areas: live performance, digital technologies, and the philosophical practice of phenomenology. It offers the reflections of someone trained in dance and philosophy on a range of technologies, from fairly low-tech to more sophisticated systems. This approach derives from an earlier project in which I developed a phenomenology of dance (Kozel 1994 ).

Download Free eBook:Closer: Performance, Technologies, Phenomenology (Leonardo Book Series) - Free epub, mobi, pdf ebooks download, ebook torrents download. As our computers become closer to our bodies, perspectives from phenomenology and dance can help us understand the wider social uses of digital technologies and design future technologies that expand our social, physical, and emotional exchanges. Be Happy!!! !!!No Mirrors below, please!

Performance, Technologies, Phenomenology · Leonardo. by Susan Kozel Author · Roger F. Malina Other. In Closer, Susan Kozel draws on live performance practice, digital technologies, and the philosophical approach of phenomenology. Performance, Kozel argues, can act as a catalyst for understanding wider social and cultural uses of digital technology. Taking this one step further, performative acts of sharing the body through our digital devices foster a collaborative construction of new physical states, levels of conscious awareness, and even ethics.

Closer: Performance, Technologies, Phenomenology. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2008. The notion of a stable and present performance has long since given way to a rhetoric. of absence and representation. Entering this discussion as a t, Kozel. wrestles with the implications of technology on the mutable properties of performance

Closer: Performance, Technologies, Phenomenology. Book · January 2008 with 25 Reads. Publisher: MIT Press. Cite this publication.

Tactical Biopolitics. al Society for the Arts, Sciences, and Technology (ISAST).

As our computers become closer to our bodies, perspectives from phenomenology and dance can help us understand the wider social uses of digital technologies and design future technologies that expand our social, physical, and emotional exchanges.

In Closer, Susan Kozel draws on live performance practice, digital technologies, and the philosophical approach of phenomenology. Trained in dance and philosophy, Kozel places the human body at the center of explorations of interactive interfaces, responsive systems, and affective computing, asking what can be discovered as we become closer to our computers―as they become extensions of our ways of thinking, moving, and touching.

Performance, Kozel argues, can act as a catalyst for understanding wider social and cultural uses of digital technology. Taking this one step further, performative acts of sharing the body through our digital devices foster a collaborative construction of new physical states, levels of conscious awareness, and even ethics. We reencounter ourselves and others through our interactive computer systems. What we need now are conceptual and methodological frameworks to reflect this.

Kozel offers a timely reworking of the phenomenology of French philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty. This method, based on a respect for lived experience, begins by listening to the senses and noting insights that arrive in the midst of dance, or quite simply in the midst of life. The combination of performance and phenomenology offered by Closer yields entwinements between experience and reflection that shed light on, problematize, or restructure scholarly approaches to human bodies using digital technologies.

After outlining her approach and methodology and clarifying the key concepts of performance, technologies, and virtuality, Kozel applies phenomenological method to the experience of designing and performing in a range of computational systems: telematics, motion capture, responsive architectures, and wearable computing.

The transformative potential of the alchemy between bodies and technologies is the foundation of Closer. With careful design, future generations of responsive systems and mobile devices can expand our social, physical, and emotional exchanges.

Reviews: 2
Sudert
If Kozel had just presented the various creative projects that she has participated in and her musing upon them this would have been a much stronger book. Instead, she is trying to present herself as a philosopher which she clearly is not - citing Mercel-Ponty ad nauseum and using variations of the word "phenomenology" in almost every other sentence demonstrates an intellectual infatuation but it doesn't make one a philosopher. She claims to be creating a new Poetics and Ethics of digitalized corporeality but never puts forward a cogent rhetoric that outlines her ideas.

The discussion of the projects was interesting however she spends too little time actually describing what was done in favor of describing her "phenomenological analysis" of what was done. While, as someone who writes about his own creative research, I appreciate her stance regarding the academic journal bias against self-reporting one's creative work, there were more than a few times she is so caught up in her beliefs that it distorts her interpretations: she cites online chats where she is clearly leading the students towards "the correct answer" as evidence that they all experienced the same things she experiences; In discussing Motion Capture ("mocap" in her lingo) she rejects Bill T. Jones and his collaborators' responses to their experience as it didn't match her "phenomenological" response to her experience (I also found it a bit presumptuous of her to refer to Mr. Jones with the familial "Bill" rather than his full or last name) ; she tells us how audience members reacted to her installation without presenting any evidence to support how she can conclude that each of them had that response.

I found the art direction of the book - with blurry, black and white photos and/or black banners covering the top half of each page - annoying. White font on black is difficult to read. I get that it was an attempt to ape the digital experience via book format but it was, like the text itself, overreaching and ultimately annoying.
Arador
There are many subtleties in this read that become evident through layers and layers of insights. I think this is a result of the author's deep understanding and lived experiences and reflections across many years thinking about the details presented in this work. The integration of technology with innovative live performance aesthetics increasingly are important in many mediums including concerts, digital entertainment, and interactive art.

Notice Bono's recent wearable laser jacket worn during Ultraviolet on the U2 360 concert tour. Gaming hardware manufacturers on the verge of removing the console barrier where human body gesture becomes one with an immersive gaming experiece. Indeed, even mobile phones are evolving into a pervasive medium for rich human expression and consumption of interactive media. This book is highly relevant, timely, and yet very forward looking on many fronts in areas where there is yet much to be explored and discovered with respect to the influence, impact, and integration of the human body and technologically-oriented culture and lifestyles.

Highly recommended if you are interested in a formal framework for understanding many of today's social computing trends, live and digital entertainment productions, as well as gaming futures.