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ISBN:0822335387
Author: Thomas M. Hawley
ISBN13: 978-0822335382
Title: The Remains of War: Bodies, Politics, and the Search for American Soldiers Unaccounted For in Southeast Asia (Politics, History, and Culture)
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ePUB size: 1492 kb
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Language: English
Category: Humanities
Publisher: Duke University Press Books (July 13, 2005)
Pages: 296

The Remains of War: Bodies, Politics, and the Search for American Soldiers Unaccounted For in Southeast Asia (Politics, History, and Culture) by Thomas M. Hawley



By cataloguing the manifold practices that keep the bodies of the absent dead alive, he enables us to understand the nation’s obsession with a political and cultural war it continually invents and reinvents at home and abroad. The Remains of War deserves an important place on the Vietnam War shelf of any library. It also offers some provocative insights on the role of this issue in our culture and on the continued irresolution about what has been the great agony of the Baby Boom generation: the Vietnam War. (Timothy J. Lomperis Perspectives on Politics).

The Remains of War deserves an important place on the Vietnam War shelf of any library. By cataloguing the manifold practices that keep the bodies of the absent dead alive, he enables us to understand the nation's obsession with a political and cultural war it continually invents and reinvents at home and abroad. Subsidiary Rights/Foreign Translations. If you're interested in a Duke University Press book for subsidiary rights/translations, please contact permissionsupress. involvement and defeat in Southeast Asia.

involvement and defeat in Southeast Asia.

Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2005. It is a thesis that Thomas Hawley propounds at several levels

Hawley, Thomas M. (2005). Durham: Duke University Press. According to Hawley, these hyperbolic undertakings - unprecedented in . history - to find every missing body are a way for the . to restore itself to victory after defeat and exercise its leverage in the global arena in its ongoing relations with Vietnam. The absent soldier becomes an innocent victim whose bodily remains need to be repatriated if the . body politic is to restore itself after defeat.

In The Remains of War, political scientist Thomas Hawley relates this paradox to the country's ongoing struggle to understand the divisive conflict. Although the United States labored to find missing soldiers before Vietnam, Hawley shows that the contemporary preoccupation with bodies began during the mid-1960s. Rather than territory occupied, the . military's "body count" became the key measure of progress during the unconventional campaign in Vietnam. When only 591 American prisoners returned in 1973, critics accused the government of abandoning living servicemen. He asserts that associated Department of Defense operations therefore involve more than finding missing soldiers.

Published: 1 February 2006. by American Library Association.

Remaking Modernity: Politics, History, And Sociology by Julia Adams. Like many concepts in the book world, "series" is a somewhat fluid and contested notion. A good rule of thumb is that series have a conventional name and are intentional creations, on the part of the author or publisher. Avoid series that cross authors, unless the authors were or became aware of the series identification (e. avoid lumping Jane Austen with her continuators).

The Politics of Heroin in Southeast Asia is a 1972 non-fiction book on heroin trafficking in Southeast Asia and the CIA complicity and aid to the Southeast Asian opium/heroin trade. Written by Alfred W. McCoy, the book covers the period from World War II to the Vietnam War. Along with McCoy's Congressional testimony, this initially controversial thesis gained a degree of mainstream acceptance.

The ongoing effort of the United States to account for its missing Vietnam War soldiers is unique. The United States requires the repatriation and positive identification of soldiers’ bodies to remove their names from the list of the missing. This quest for certainty in the form of the material, identified body marks a dramatic change from previous wars, in which circumstantial evidence often sufficed to account for missing casualties. In The Remains of War, Thomas M. Hawley considers why the body of the missing soldier came to assume such significance in the wake of the Vietnam War. Illuminating the relationship between the effort to account for missing troops and the political and cultural forces of the post-Vietnam era, Hawley argues that the body became the repository of the ambiguities and anxieties surrounding the U.S. involvement and defeat in Southeast Asia.

Hawley combines the theoretical insights of Judith Butler, Michel Foucault, and Emmanuel Levinas with detailed research into the history of the movement to recover the remains of soldiers missing in Vietnam. He examines the practices that constitute the Defense Department’s accounting protocol: the archival research, archaeological excavation, and forensic identification of recovered remains. He considers the role of the American public and the families of missing soldiers in demanding the release of pows and encouraging the recovery of the missing; the place of the body of the Vietnam veteran within the war’s legacy; and the ways that memorials link individual bodies to the body politic. Highlighting the contradictions inherent in the recovery effort, Hawley reflects on the ethical implications of the massive endeavor of the American government and many officials in Vietnam to account for the remains of American soldiers.