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ISBN:0313281998
Author: Herbert Aptheker
ISBN13: 978-0313281990
Title: Anti-Racism in U.S. History: The First Two Hundred Years (Bibliographies of the Presidents of the United States,)
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ePUB size: 1732 kb
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Language: English
Category: Humanities
Publisher: Praeger (February 28, 1992)
Pages: 264

Anti-Racism in U.S. History: The First Two Hundred Years (Bibliographies of the Presidents of the United States,) by Herbert Aptheker



Many books, both popular and scholarly, have examined racism in the United States, and the belief that racism has been essentially unchallenged by white people is pervasive. In this unique book, Aptheker, a well-known scholar in the field, examines the existence of anti-racism in this country, covering the period from the 1600s through the 1860s-challenging the view that racism was universally accepted by whites until the outbreak of the Civil War. Covering the period from the 1600s to 1860, this book by a well-known scholar in the field will be of interest to all concerned with .

Anti-Racism in . ) Many books, both popular and scholarly, have examined racism in the United States, but this unique volume is the first to examine the existence of anti-racism in the first two hundred years of . Herbert Aptheker challenges the view that racism was universally accepted by whites.

History: The First Two Hundred Years, (Praeger: CT, 1992). Works featuring an introduction or foreword by Aptheker. Washington, Booker . Herbert Aptheker (Foreword), The Negro in the South 2nd e. (Carol Publishing Group: NJ, 1989). Kelley, "Interview of Herbert Aptheker," The Journal of American History, vol. 87, no. 1 (June 2000), pp. 151–167. Gary Murrell, "Herbert Aptheker's Unity of Theory and Practice in the Communist Party USA: On the Last Night, and during the First Two Decades," Science & Society, vol. 70, no. 1, (Jan. 2006), pp. 98–118. Gary Murrell, "The Most Dangerous Communist in the United States": A Biography of Herbert Aptheker (University of Massachusetts Press, 2015).

Herbert Aptheker challenges the view that racism was universally accepted by whites. His book thoroughly debunks the myth that white people never cared about the plight Many books, both popular and scholarly, have examined racism in the United States, but this unique volume is the first to examine the existence of anti-racism in the first two hundred years of . This book by a well-known scholar in the field will be of interest to all concerned with . history and African American history.

Herbert Aptheker challenges the view that racism was universally accepted by whites. His book thoroughly debunks the myth that white people never cared about the plight of African-Americans until just before the outbreak of the Civil War. Covering the period from the 1600s through the 1860s. This present volume on the first two hundred years of "anti-racism" in the United States ends with the American Civil War, but another volume is promised, which will take the story into the early twentieth century. This book presents a great deal of evidence that shows racism met considerable opposition in this country for many years. The preeminent Marxist historian of the African American experience has produced another major work that will provoke debate and stimulate reevaluation; this time of the character and extent of anti-racism in the.

Finding Aids for Official House Records. The passage of anti-lynching legislation became one of the NAACP’s central goals. Although slow to join the cause because its leaders worried about the constitutionality of imposing such a federal law on the states, the NAACP eventually embraced the anti-lynching movement, using it to educate the often ambivalent white population and spur substantive action. The anti-lynching effort provided the NAACP with valuable experience both waging a mass public relations campaign and mastering the art of congressional relations. 123 In the 1920s, through the organizational leadership and diverse talents of its secretary, James Weldon Johnson, the NAACP became a significant vehicle for marshaling public opinion.

The story of the United States begins with the thirteen colonies which by the late 18th century had . million people. In its struggle towards independence, the Declaration of Independence led to the American Revolution in 1776. Between the Revolution against Britain and the American Civil War in 1861, the young nation went through a myriad of storms, politically and socially, in addition to the significant progress it went through. Wilson tried to keep the . out of the war, but then in 1917 relented and declared war against Germany. The Wall Street Crash of 1929 came after a decade of prosperous living, the years that followed marked a world wide Great Depression that lasted for ten years. Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) and other politicians presented the people a form of relief in what was called the New Deal. This brought in various types of programs that included relief, recovery, and reform.

The United States was still young, and the Midwest was a wild, unsettled frontier. They stopped in the middle of a forest in Spencer County, Indiana. Neighbors were few and far away, and the family lived in a three-sided shelter until Abe's father cleared enough land and built a log cabin. Abe and his sister helped with the heavy daily tasks that came with farming. His childhood in the frontier of Indiana set the course for his character and motivation later in life. He brought a new honesty and integrity to the White House, He would always be remembered as "honest Ab. Most of all, he is associated with the final abolition of slavery. Lincoln became a virtual symbol of the American dream whereby an ordinary person from humble beginnings could reach the pinnacle of society as president of the country. His first name comes from the word that means "blessed by God" in Arabic.

American Negro Slave Revolts, Documentary History of the Negro People in the United States, History of the American People, The Correspondence of W. E. B. DuBois, Anti-Racism in . Communist Party USA, Peace and Freedom Party.

The earliest presidents, most of whom are considered to be Founding Fathers of the United States, are usually the easiest to remember. Streets, counties, and cities are named after all of them across the country. Washington is called the father of his country for good reason: His ragtag Revolutionary army beat the British, and that made the United States of America a country. He served as the country's first president, guiding it through its infancy, and set the tone. Jefferson, the writer of the Declaration of Independence, expanded the country tremendously with the Louisiana Purchase. Nixon resigned in 1974 after the House of Representatives passed three articles of impeachment against him. The Reagan years brought peace and prosperity as in the '50s, with a popular president presiding.

Many books, both popular and scholarly, have examined racism in the United States, but this unique volume is the first to examine the existence of anti-racism in the first two hundred years of U.S. history. Herbert Aptheker challenges the view that racism was universally accepted by whites. His book thoroughly debunks the myth that white people never cared about the plight of African-Americans until just before the outbreak of the Civil War.

Covering the period from the 1600s through the 1860s, Aptheker begins with a short introduction and a questioning of racism's pervasiveness, taking examples of anti-racism from the literature. He then devotes sections to sexual relations, racism and anti-racism, to joint struggles to reject racism, and to a discussion of Gregoire, Banneker, and Jeffersonianism. Next he considers inferiority as viewed by poets, preachers, and teachers and by entrepreneuers, seamen, and cowboys. After a consideration of the Quakers, he turns his attention to the American and French revolutions and racism and to the Republic's early years and racism. Aptheker then devotes several sections to Abolitionism and concludes the work with the the Crisis Decade, the Civil War, Emancipation, and anti-racism. This book by a well-known scholar in the field will be of interest to all concerned with U.S. history and African American history.