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ISBN:0521782228
Author: Mark Johnston
ISBN13: 978-0521782227
Title: Fighting the Enemy: Australian Soldiers and their Adversaries in World War II
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ePUB size: 1925 kb
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Language: English
Category: Humanities
Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (September 25, 2000)
Pages: 238

Fighting the Enemy: Australian Soldiers and their Adversaries in World War II by Mark Johnston



by compiled by Michael Harrington. ISBN: 0644253924 Author: Harrington, Michael, 1950- Publication & Distribution: Canberra On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Fighting the enemy : Australian soldiers and their adversaries in World War II, Mark Johnston.

Fighting the Enemy book. Fighting the Enemy is about men with the job of killing each other  . Based on the wartime writings of hundreds of Australian front-line soldiers during World War II, this powerful and resonant book contains many moving descriptions of high emotion and drama. Soldiers' interactions with their enemies are central to war, and their attitudes to their adversaries are crucial to Fighting the Enemy is about men with the job of killing each other

Fighting the Enemy: Australian Soldiers and their Adversaries in World War II. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ; Stanley, Peter (2002). Alamein: The Australian Story. Melbourne: Oxford University Press. The Australian Army in World War II. Illustrated by Carlos Chagas. The Proud 6th: An Illustrated History of the 6th Australian Division 1939–1946. Port Melbourne: Oxford University Press. Whispering Death: Australian Airmen in the Pacific War. Crows Nest, New South Wales: Allen & Unwin.

Soldiers' interactions with their enemies are central to war, and their attitudes to their adversaries are crucial to the way wars are fought. Library descriptions. Based on the wartime writings of hundred of front-line soldiers during WWII.

Fighting The Enemy, first published in 2000, is about men with the job of killing each other. Soldiers' interactions with their enemies are central to war and their attitudes to their adversaries are crucial to the way wars are fought. Yet few books look in detail at how enemies interpret each other.

Fighting the Enemy: Australian Soldiers and Their Adversaries in World War II, by Mark Johnston. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000. isbn 0–521–78222–8; xi + 206 pages, gures, maps, notes, photographs, conventions and abbre-viations, bibliography, index. In so doing he not only com-plements his earlier book on the expe-riences of Australian soldiers in World War II (In the Front Line, 1996 ) but also draws attention to a variable of which all historians of military conict should be aware: Even in warfare, antagonisms, like loyalties and sym-pathies, may not be undifferentiated.

Home All Categories Fighting the Enemy: Australian Soldiers and their Adversaries in World War II: Australian Soldiers and Their Adversaries in World War II. ISBN: 0521119952. ISBN13: 9780521119955. Fighting the Enemy : Australian Soldiers and Their Adversaries in World War II. by Mark D. Johnston.

Fighting the Enemy: Australian Soldiers and their Adversaries in World War II.

Australian historian Mark Johnston quoted Rommel praising the "tenacity" of Australian soldiers in the following books: That Magnificent 9th: An illustrated history of the 9th Australian Division and Fighting the Enemy: Australian Soldiers and their Adversaries in World War II. He specifically quoted Rommel saying the following about Australian soldiers: "The enemy fought with remarkable tenacity. Even their wounded went on defending themselves with small arms fire and stayed in the fight to their last breath.

Fighting the Enemy is about men with the job of killing each other. Based on the wartime writings of hundreds of Australian front-line soldiers during World War II, this powerful and resonant book contains many moving descriptions of high emotion and drama. Soldiers' interactions with their enemies are central to war, and their attitudes to their adversaries are crucial to the way wars are fought. This book is an unprecedented and thorough examination of the way Australian combat soldiers interacted with troops from the four powers engaged in World War II.
Reviews: 2
Inabel
The Australian army served on both sides of the world and against a total of four enemies; the Italians, the Vichy French, the Germans and of course the Japanese. While ultimately finishing on the winning side everywhere, there were reverses and disasters. This book explores the Australian soldier’s attitudes to those enemies, across those situations.

It must be remembered that many Australian soldiers were volunteers, who had grown up on the epic stories of their predecessors in the First World War. They were proud, even arrogant and it mattered greatly to them, as to how they ‘went’ against their opponents. Johnston explores this through their letters and accounts in their unit and general histories. The bulk of these concern the desert fighting of the 6th Division against the Italians and the epic battles of Tobruk and Alamain by the 9th against both the Germans and Italians. There is a smattering of material on the brief Greek campaign and slightly more on the battle for Crete and the Syrian campaign against the Vichy French. About half the book looks at battle against the Japanese in the Pacific.

The nature of the book means that there is rather more on actual fighting than usual. Victories were ascribed to Australian soldiery qualities and defeats to opposition quantity and support arms. Ironically, when the tables were turned later in the war, these same considerations were often absent. Interestingly, the most many soldiers saw of the enemy was as POWs, so there is quite a bit on observations made here. There is also more humanity on display. The way the Australians rated their opponents as well as themselves is quite interesting. There is a professional element but also at times a racial or racist aspect, especially concerning the Japanese whose conduct often bewildered or outraged the Australians. There are also brief chapters on how these enemies regarded Australians as soldiers.

The author has researched extensively for this book. Even so, it only numbers about 140 pages of text. This points to the limits of surviving correspondence and primary sources. I wonder whether interviews with surviving veterans might’ve helped extend this to any advantage? Personally I found the material on battle with the Germans most interesting. There is nothing on actions against the 1st SS in Greece but decent chapters regarding the Africa Corps and to a lessor degree the paras on Crete. Altogether though, it is a fascinating subject and I wish it had been twice as long!
Jare
Fighting the Enemy is a vitally important addition to any historical survey of WW2 in that it focuses specifically on the Australian fighting man and his foe. This superb volume draws in detail from personal accounts of Italian, German, Vichy France and Japanese soldiers, as well as the Australians themselves. The central theme examines the perceptions and attitudes of the Australian soldier by his enemies and likewise those of the Australian soldier towards them.

These accounts are based on the writings of hundreds of Australian front line troops during WWII from North Africa, Middle East, Mediterranean and Pacific theaters. In each chapter we get a break down of the interactions between Axis and Allied Australian forces in battle, often seen through the eyes of POW's from both sides of the conflict.

We find out why the Australians considered the Italian soldier almost ridiculous and why the Italian soldiers were said to be terrified by the reputation of the Aussies. We gain insight into the perceptions of German commanders towards the Australian forces - Rommel himself believed the Australians were the Elite forces of the British Commonwealth and among the Germans the Australian Soldier was greatly feared and respected. What unfolds between the Afrika Korps and the Aussies is a tacit mutual respect and esprit de corps rarely found anywhere else during WW2.

In one passage we hear ...

"An Australian in another battalion reported that a German prisoner he met in 1942 claimed that the Australians had gone home, but that the English troops continued to `dress up as Australians to frighten us'

In another ...

"Early in the siege, the German Commander, Rommel, described Australians as `fighting magnificently' and showing `remarkable tenacity'.

Throughout the book we are treated to moments of great humour and levity between the various forces in spite of the terrible actions they were involved in. Truces between the Germans and Australians to collect the dead and wounded are examined and discussed and quickly forgotten when punctuated with resumed shelling.

While I have featured the Western Desert conflict in this review the section on the Pacific conflict with the Japanese is no less riveting and in some ways far more serious in nature. Australia was now defending it's own nation in the same way Britain was defending itself. One Australian account tells of a soldier who felt respectful ambivalence towards the German soldiers he faced in North Africa, Crete and Greece, but when it came to the Japanese it was outright hatred - knowing he now fought off an invasion.. He comments, "Now I know how the British feel about the Germans".

The writing of Mark Johnston is both powerful in its execution and yet completely accessible for any reader. There is no lack of documentation punctuated by excellent black and white plates and yet the writing never bogs down into dry historical data. I found myself almost through the half the book in one sitting and could hardly put it down.

This is a rare and important work of WW2 history and something that should be on the shelves of all those with a serious interest in understanding the Australian contribution in this war.