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Download Building Enterprise Taxonomies epub book
ISBN:0578078228
Author: Darin L. Stewart
ISBN13: 978-0578078229
Title: Building Enterprise Taxonomies
Format: lrf txt doc mbr
ePUB size: 1752 kb
FB2 size: 1911 kb
DJVU size: 1104 kb
Language: English
Category: Computer Science
Publisher: Mokita Press; 2nd ed. edition (January 24, 2011)
Pages: 242

Building Enterprise Taxonomies by Darin L. Stewart



Building Enterprise Taxonomies book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Building Enterprise Taxonomies. by. Darin L. Stewart. Taxonomies have been fundamental to organizing knowledge and information for centuries

by Darin L. Stewart (Author). ISBN-13: 978-0578078229. Stewart, P. is an Information Technology analyst based in Portland, Oregon. He is also an Adjunct Professor of Applied Information Management for the University of Oregon. He holds a doctorate in Information Science from the University of Pittsburgh. What bothers me most about the book are three things - errors arising from poor proofreading or those that are simply incorrect (and thus misleading for the reader), poor ion of thesaurus standards, and a very badly constructed index. In the first case, the author's lack of basic familiarity with topics that he is using for examples creates problems.

Taxonomies have been fundamental to organizing knowledge and information for centuries. Now they are the backbone of well organized information systems and the lynchpin of findability in an online world. This book is the first taxonomy primer to present how to design, create, apply and maintain structured vocabularies, including taxonomy, thesauri, ontology and folksonomy, specifically for digital information.

Building Enterprise Taxonomies by Darin L. The book has 238 pages and is intended as a primer on creating, applying and maintaining managed vocabularies. The chapters include: Findability. Knowledge Management.

Building Enterprise Taxonomies. Author: Darin Stewart. Taxonomies have been fundamental to organizing knowledge and information for centuries.

Darin Stewart’s book, Building Enterprise Taxonomies (2008), functions as a useful primer for approaching taxonomy work, but it is also still at a fairly high level.

Darin Stewart the author of Building Enterprise Taxonomies writes in his blog, In my experience, using the T word in conversation invokes one of two responses. Either people immediately fall asleep or they run screaming from the room. There is very little middle ground. Wall Street Network is a KMWorld 100 Companies that matter in Knowledge Management. I am very interest in your thoughts and ideas on this subject, good, bad or indifferent.

Building Enterprise Taxonomies, Darin Stewart, BookSurge Publishing (2008), ISBN: 141969362X (see the WorldCat’s site or the bookmashup RDF data). Emerging Technologies for Semantic Work Environments: Techniques, Methods, and Applications, Jörg Rech, Björn Decker, Eric Ras, ISBN: 9781599048772 (see the WorldCat’s site or the bookmashup RDF data). Building Integrative Enterprise Knowledge Portals with Semantic Web Technologies, T. Priebe, IOS Press (2006), ISBN: 1586035843 (see the WorldCat’s site or the bookmashup RDF data). Agency and the Semantic Web, Christopher Walton, Oxford University Press (2006), ISBN: 0199292485 (see the WorldCat’s site or the bookmashup RDF data).

Taxonomies have been fundamental to organizing knowledge and information for centuries. Now they are the backbone of well organized information systems and the lynchpin of findability in an online world. This book is the first taxonomy primer to present how to design, create, apply and maintain structured vocabularies, including taxonomy, thesauri, ontology and folksonomy, specifically for digital information. This comprehensive and accessible guide explains how to make sure both content creators and content consumers are speaking the same language. (Second Edition)

Reviews: 3
energy breath
I really enjoyed reading this book. It is informative to give a thourough understanding of metadata. My SharePoint Certification trainer recommended it and I really enjoy it.
Vijora
Easy read but very informative at the same time. good intro to the topic
Cobyno
I've been teaching taxonomy/thesaurus construction for about 20 years now but mostly with an eye to indexing information resources and realia (as in museums). I decided to read this book with an eye to understanding the role of taxonomies in the "enterprise" since I have an increasing number of students who are interested in knowledge management or who have business backgrounds.

Overall, the book provides a overview of the issues in developing knowledge organization tools -- highly structured controlled vocabularies (classification schemes, taxonomies, thesauri, etc) -- for managing and providing access to an organizations information and knowledge assets. The topics are the standard ones for this area and, for the most part, are usefully discussed--there's a great deal of support and guidance for the newbie who is facing the problem of creating a controlled vocabulary to meet the needs of an organization. The basics of term relationship structure are discussed and, in discussion of vocabulary interoperability, there is a brief introduction to XML and discussion of Zthes but no mention of the simpler notion of crosswalks. There is also a brief discussion of RDF (Resource Description Framework) following an equally brief discussion of ontologies.

What bothers me most about the book are three things -- errors arising from poor proofreading or those that are simply incorrect (and thus misleading for the reader), poor examples/implementation of thesaurus standards, and a very badly constructed index. In the first case, the author's lack of basic familiarity with topics that he is using for examples creates problems. Within a few pages I encountered the following: (1) "blimp", "zeppelin," and "dirigible" are all defined as "nonrigid, buoyant airships" although the zeppelin was a rigid airship (dirigible is a generic term for the same rigid airship); (2) "Phylum" is used as a plural (rather than "Phyla"); (3) the scientific name of the dog is given as "Canis Familari" rather than "Canis familiaris" and both dogs and wolves are put in the order "Ungulculata" rather than "Unguiculata"--probably a misreading of handwritten notes (substituting an l for an i) but a taxonomist should be aware of these things if s/he is going to discuss biological taxonomy with examples. (Also, species name should not be capitalized--at least when dealing with the scientific names of animals, and the full scientific name should be italicized or underlined because it's a non-English language--but this is rarely observed outside of the life sciences.) In a later chapter, "cell biology" and "embryology" are defined as subtopics within "anatomy." This is simply wrong. Anatomy and embryology are parallel, interlocking disciplines and cell biology covers so much more than just structure.

Some of the term & structure advice is a bit dubious. Taxonomy builders following the statement that "Related Term links don't need to be reciprocal" run the risk of building vocabularies that don't work well -- this is also an explicit violation of the definition of Related Term in Z39.19. The notion that RT links belong to peripheral terms is an odd one and doesn't hold up well in areas such as Education, where fine distinctions in core concepts are important. The issue of under what conditions RT links between sibling terms isn't discussed well. There are many instances where adjectives (other than color or size) are used as stand-alone terms. This is very poor practice in developing vocabularies where multiple terms are assigned to metadata fields because, without the parent term noun, you don't know what a term such as "soft" or "electric" modifies. The author violates his own rule when he uses the singular "cheese" as the top term in a hierarchy of different kinds of cheeses.

The index is very poorly structured for actual use -- run-on lists of page numbers at a single level (no sub-entries, no page ranges) are not a good way to support users' need to find where topics are discussed (so the principle of findability is violated). It really looks as though the index was constructed using the simplest approach -- choose words that might be of interest and list all of the pages where the words occur. This is NOT the way a decent Back of the Book index is constructed. This has been discussed by other reviewers as well.