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ISBN:058501972X
ISBN13: 978-0585019727
Title: The Lightning Field: Travels in and Around New Mexico
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The Lightning Field: Travels in and Around New Mexico



New Mexico Description and travel. Rubrics: Navajo Indians. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book The lightning field : travels in and around New Mexico, Robert Eaton.

Steven said: If you're interested in New Mexico, this is a must-read book  . Robert Eaton lived in New Mexico for years while closely observing people and places. Jan 14, 2009 Patrick Gibson rated it it was ok. Shelves: road trip, new mexico.

The Lightning Field: Travels in and Around New Mexico by Eaton, Robert (1995) Paperback. The Lightning Field" is a series of portraits of people and out-of-the-way places in New Mexico and, occasionally, neighboring states. In the spirit of Ian Frazier’s "Great Plains" and Bruce Chatwin’s "In Patagonia," Robert Eaton illustrates the intimate connections between the land and the people who inhabit it. In recounting his travels, Eaton combines a fine eye for natural detail with a generous and compassionate spirit.

The Lightning Field (1977), by the American sculptor Walter De Maria, is a work of Land Art situated in a remote area of the high desert of western New Mexico. The poles - two inches in diameter and averaging 20 feet and 7½ inches in height - are spaced 220 feet apart and have solid pointed tips that define a horizontal plane. A sculpture to be walked in as well as viewed, The Lightning Field is intended to be experienced over an extended period of time. Images for educational use, may be requested by contacting rights and reproductions department at rightsrt.

book by Robert Eaton. The true excitement of New Mexico is not the cities and hotels, which can be found elsewhere, but the unique way in which humanity, now and throughout a colorful history, has lived in and died in and related to the strikingly beautiful geography of New Mexico. Drive past the new suburbs of Albuquerque and you are suddenly confronted by the overwhelming presence of nature. This is both wonderful and scary (to a city slicker). If God were anywhere, he'd be here, and you'd probably feel like striking up a conversation.

Walter De Maria's Lightning Field (1977) is one of the 20th century's most significant works of art. Situated in a remote area of desert in southwestern New Mexico. Baker's book is not worthwhile reading! The garrulous San Franciscan put together this preachy rant and utterly ignored the artwork. The Lightning Field: Travels in and Around New Mexico.

My pilgrimage to The Lightning Field was considerably more arduous and time consuming. The closest town is Quemado, about two and a half hours southwest of Albuquerque. The drive takes you through the high desert of New Mexico. This area is flat but beautiful. The summer morning was chilly and sunny and my friends and I met our guide at the Dia Foundation office, a nearly empty building in a very sleepy town. At midday, many of the poles seemed to disappear as the sun hit them from above and in the early afternoon the tips shone so brightly that they almost looked like burning candles. Around the clock, these man-made poles reminded us of nature’s ephemeral qualities and the poetry of consciously experiencing our surroundings. Of course, the title of this work teases you with the possibility of seeing lightning strike and dance atop the poles.

Discover The Lightning Field in Quemado, New Mexico: In the remote high desert of New Mexico, a strange array of poles beckon fury from above. Located on a flat plain in the high desert of New Mexico, at an elevation of 7,200 feet above sea level, the poles-two inches in diameter and around 20 feet high-are spaced 220 feet apart and have solid pointed tips that define a horizontal plane.

The Lightning Field, 1977. Photo: John Cliett, July 1979. Courtesy Dia Art Foundation, New York. And yet, Isolation is the essence of land art, concluded De Maria in his notes on The Lightning Field. And in a rare interview, included in Robert Hughes’s BBC series The Shock of the New, he said that part of the content of the work is the ratio of people to space. So if we think of four to six people in one day walking through the field they have a very private experience. Unfortunately, one can’t often get a private enough experience in the museum, though the museum has its function. The museum has its own architecture, its own traditions, which don’t fit here

My pilgrimage to The Lightning Field was considerably more arduous and time consuming.

Reviews: 2
Cemav
I've read several "travelogues" and such over the years about New Mexico, but no one has ever captured the reality of the place like Robert Eaton. Too often, writers focus on sensational features, or they're trying to 'sell' something. Eaton's stories are very different--they came about because of his own "deep immersion" experiences, rather than as someone just passing through. These pieces would be considered autobiographical except that he's not focused on himself--he's focused on what he's observing in others. He has an excellent eye and he's a brave, courageous reporter. The stories range from a trip to De Maria's "Lightning Field" to the Christ in the Desert Monastery to his experiences working at Chaco Canyon. All of the stories are very compelling. He's a very fine writer, and I hope that maybe one day he'll write another book.
Yar
The true excitement of New Mexico is not the cities and hotels, which can be found elsewhere, but the unique way in which humanity, now and throughout a colorful history, has lived in and died in and related to the strikingly beautiful geography of New Mexico. Drive past the new suburbs of Albuquerque and you are suddenly confronted by the overwhelming presence of nature. This is both wonderful and scary (to a city slicker). If God were anywhere, he'd be here, and you'd probably feel like striking up a conversation. Robert Eaton has lived in the Southwest for many years, and has worked in such strikingly amazing places as Chaco Canyon. His book is an entertaining series of his personal experiences, each in a unique setting in the far reaches of New Mexico. Each experience is also an encounter with one or more colorful characters, including many native Americans, religious seekers, and loner forest rangers, not to mention rattlers, coyotes, and eagles. But place never leaves center stage for long. In fact, it is the interaction of people and place that Mr. Eaton captures with great precision and poetry. This book does not recommend hotels, restaurants, or other trappings of the comfortable life. Other books can do that. Instead, Robert Eaton shares his discoveries, collected over many years, so that we may gain a better sense of what makes New Mexico truly unique, not what makes it more of the same. If you have been to the places Eaton characterizes, as I have to some, you get to experience them again in a well-written account, even with a new richness. The adventurers among you will feel the rising urge to go and see these places first hand. (That is certainly the effect Mr. Eaton's book has had on me.) Those who prefer to experience these places in your mind's eye from the comfort and security of your plush reading chair will find that this book goes well with a glowing fire, warm dog, and perhaps a glass of Merlot.