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Faking It: The Quest for Authenticity in Popular Music



Faking It: The Quest for Authenticity in Popular Music is a book written in 2007 by Yuval Taylor and Hugh Barker. In this book the authors discuss the quest for authenticity in popular music and the influence that that quest has had in the type of music that is played and listened, in particular a preference for raw, simple, underproduced music as opposed to sophisticated, complex, carefully produced music. Faking It:A blog devoted mainly to questions of authenticity in popular music, by the authors.

Ry cooder and the ubiquitous Buena Vista Social Club, and the quest for authenticity which is the raison d'etre of the "world music" genre (so say the authors, I'm not so sure. I listen to foreign stuff because it's different, not because it's not fake. As far as I know, the African bands I hear might be the Nigerian version of the Monkees, I wouldn't know). 10. Play - Moby, the KLF and the Ongoing Quest. Well by now I was a bit bored to tell you the truth. But hey, these ideas are well worth booting around the football pitch.

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In this book the authors discuss the quest for authenticity in popular music and the influence that that quest has had in the type of music that is played and listened, in particular a preference for raw, simple, underproduced music as opposed to sophisticated, complex, carefully produced music. It was popular with men and women, from many different backgrounds. The disco sound often has several components, a beat, an eighth note or 16th note hi-hat pattern with an open hi-hat on the off-beat. In most disco tracks, string sections, horns, electric piano, Orchestral instruments such as the flute are often used for solo melodies, and lead guitar is less frequently used in disco than in rock.

Along the way, the authors discuss the segregation of music in the South, investigate the predominance of self-absorption in modern pop, reassess the rebellious ridiculousness of rockabilly and disco, and delineate how the quest for authenticity has not only made some music great and some music terrible but also shaped in a fundamental way the development of popular music in our time.

Along the way, the authors discuss the segregation of music in the South, investigate the predominance of self-absorption in modern pop, reassess the rebellious ridiculousness of rockabilly and disco, and delineate how the quest for authenticity has not only made some music great and some music terrible but also shaped in a fundamental way the development of popular music in our time. Musicians strive to keep it real ; listeners condemn fakes ;. but does great music really need to be authentic? Did Elvis sing from the heart, or was he just acting? Were the Sex Pistols more real than disco? Why do so many musicians base their approach on being authentic, and why do music buffs fall for it every time?

Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Faking it : the quest for authenticity in popular music Hugh Barker and Yuval Taylor. Book's title: Faking it : the quest for authenticity in popular music Hugh Barker and Yuval Taylor. Library of Congress Control Number: 2006039754. Popular music United States History and criticism Music Performance Authenticity (Philosophy) Social aspects. Download now Faking it : the quest for authenticity in popular music Hugh Barker and Yuval Taylor. Download PDF book format. Download DOC book format.

Hugh Barker and Yuval Taylor’s Faking It is about how performers since Rodgers, stoked by powerful notions in the cultural air, have been inordinately interested in proving how real they are. The authors devote much of a chapter to Jimmie the Kid because, they contend, this autobiographical song took a pioneering stroll on one of the three paths to authenticity - the path they call personal authenticity. The case study of the second path, representational authenticity, is the Monkees - a group created not in the traditional dank basement but at a television casting call. If they had made use of Lionel Trilling’s classic 1972 book, Sincerity and Authenticity, for example, they would have been able to trace the lineage of such tortured neo-Romantics as Neil Young, Kurt Cobain and John Lydon back to Edmund Burke’s denigration of beauty in favor of the energy and power of the sublime.

Also, there are many aspects of authenticity when it is being used to describe music. It can be representational, cultural, or personal authenticity. And how this quest has caused entire genres to be labeled as inauthentic, and has even redefined authenticity for certain genres, as if being real isn’t real enough,.

Reviews: 7
Fek
If you can sustain your interest through the first few chapters, the book succeeds at presenting equal arguments for and against the title "authenticity" in music. The authors avoid "name-dropping" in favor of "situation-dropping," explaining in length the pretexts that surround some of the biggest artists in music. I felt that they managed to present the paradoxical subject with a good personal distance; there were only small portions that were editorialized.

This isn't a guidebook on how to "be real," nor a Rolling Stone-esque exposé on (Your Favorite Artist), but serves more like a history of American music with an industry-related context. It explains personal and professional strategies that swayed particular musicians and bands into fakery or reality, and explores those notions carefully.
JoldGold
The book is very insightful, some chapters more so than others. As a participant in the folk revolution in the first half of the 1960s, the chapter on "Mississippi" John Hurt particularly resonated with me. However, I can readily see how other chapters would affect readers who came of age in other musical periods.

My only problem is definitional; the authors were too Manichean about authenticity versus the lack thereof. As I see it, while a second edition of Moby Dick may lack the authenticity of the first, it is nevertheless a desirable artifact. In other words, such other factors as age and popularity (i.e., staying power) may compensate for missing authenticity. Accordingly, while the authors would classify as "inauthentic folk music" such songs as Early Morning Rain and City of New Orleans, I would be a less restrictive; they are destined to join such equally inauthentic folk songs as Camptown Races and This Land Is Your Land in the great American folk canon.

Similarly, the authors define as "authentic" a song by Kurt Cobain and an album by Neil Young that were each recorded in one take and display all kind of [authentic] imperfections and angst. However, I question whether that makes them more authentic than a perfect opus by Pink Floyd or Miles Davis, or for that matter, Sinatra's perfect cover of I've Got You Under My Skin, which reportedly took over 30 takes to complete. And, if it is angst that confers authenticity, then that goofy pop tune, It Never Rains In California, takes the cake ("Out of work, out of bread, out of self-respect, I'm out of my head, I'm under-loved and underfed, I want to go hoooome").

Buy the book; just pretend that its title is Random Thoughts On Post-60s Music; you'll enjoy it and it will make you think.
Daiktilar
This was written by two rock critics, one British, one American. Like a lot of critics, they're self-conscious about not making artistic contributions of their own, and justify their existence by denigrating those who've become successful - the more successful, the more they're put down. Another technique is to present facts and contradictions to the public story (like - we're the real insiders!). There were quite a few inaccuracies in the book, and, in some places, they give reasons for their negativity and later use opposite arguments for further criticism.(!) I think a lot of celebrity bios might actually give more perspective.
Shliffiana
Forgive me for any language mistakes, i'm from Brazil and I've find this book really interesting about the perception of authenticity by the listener, with a lot of stories about Elvis, Nirvana, Leadbelly and others!
Amerikan_Volga
gift, didn't read, came as advertised or better
The Sphinx of Driz
More than I ever knew, the concept of "keeping it real" to oneself and musical audiences is essentially as old as music itself. From the blues and folk, to pop, rock and hip hop, the quest for realness is an interesting study. These writers are superb in bringing out the narrative by teaching and not preaching. They are simply posing a lot of questions and it is up to the reader and music fan to see things in their own way. I truly LOVE the beginning of the book. While it does not end as well as it begins, the book maintains a level of consistency in the body to the conclusion. I feel as if I traveled through time as a musical fan from the early 1900s to the end of the century.

I would love for these writers to author a "realness" book focusing on R&B and hip hop because I feel that those genres specifically offer PLENTY of case studies and examples for a general thesis.

All in all, read this book. It's great.