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ISBN:0970350945
Author: Layna Fischer
ISBN13: 978-0970350947
Title: Workflow Handbook 2003
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ePUB size: 1402 kb
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Publisher: Future Strategies (April 8, 2003)
Pages: 384

Workflow Handbook 2003 by Layna Fischer



Layna Fischer, Layna Fischer. Published in association with the Workflow Management Coalition (WfMC), the Workflow Handbook 2002 comprises four sections in over 400 information-packed pages: SECTION 1: The World of Workflow covers a wide spectrum of viewpoints and discussions by experts in their respective fields. SECTION 2 offers selected award-winning Case Studies from the annual Excellence in Workflow awards.

Published in association with the Workflow Management Coalition (WfMC), the Workflow Handbook 2002 comprises four sections in over 400 information-packed pages: SECTION 1: The World of Workflow covers a wide spectrum of viewpoints and discussions by experts in their respective fields.

Workflow Handbook 2003 has been added to your Cart. In fact, instead of getting the book, get the CD ROM version titled "Workflow Handbook 2001 Companion CD ROM" (ISBN 0970350910), which contains the entire contents of the book in PDF format as well as much more content.

Workflow handbook 2003 by Layna Fischer, Workflow Management.

He is the author of Business Process Change: A Manager's Guide to Improving, Redesigning, and Automating Processes (2003). He has previously co-authored Developing E-business Systems and Architectures (2001), Understanding UML (1998), and Intelligent Software Systems Development (1993). Mr. Harmon has served as a senior consultant and head of Cutter Consortium's Distributed Architecture practice.

Yun-Heh Chen-Burger, Jussi Stader (2003) Formal Support for Adaptive Workflow Systems in a Distributed Environment, Section I, Chapter of book: Workflow Handbook 2003, pp. 93-118. Published in association with Workflow Management Coalition. Publisher: Future Strategies In. USA, April 2003. Workflow Management Coalition is one of the most influential standard organisations for business process modelling and workflow. Yun-Heh Chen-Burger.

The Workflow Re f- erence Model, published in last year’s Handbook can also be downloaded from the WfMC we bsite. You may contact them if you wish to pursue a discussion on their topic

Fischer L. (e. - Workflow Handbook. Читать книгу бесплатно. Скачать книгу с нашего сайта нельзя. SECTION 2 offers selected award-winning Case Studies from the annual Excellence in Workflow awards

Introduction to Workflow. Workflow Handbook 2002. pdf (see notes) Matteo Bonifacio, Paolo Bouquet and Alberto Manzardo. Book Series of Advanced Information and Knowledge Processing, Springer VerLag, December 2004. Dave Robertson and Jaume Agusti. Software Blueprints: Lightweight Uses of Logic in Conceptual Modelling.

Future Strategies In. Book Division Lighthouse Point, Florida. All brand names and product names mentioned in this book are trademarks or service marks of their respective companies. Any omission or misuse should not be regarded as intent to infringe on the property of others.

Welcome to the Workflow Handbook 2003. This landmark 10th anniversary edition from the Workflow Management Coalition (WfMC) offers you three sections:

SECTION 1: The World of Workflow covers a wide spectrum of viewpoints and discussions by experts in their respective fields. Papers range from an uncomplicated definition of the technology, architecture styles, the importance of Web Services, adaptive workflow in a distributed environment, group applications, Business Activity Management to discussions on emerging technologies.

SECTION 2: Workflow Standards deals with the importance of standards, and includes discussions and examples on the importance and deployment of standards, specifically the new XPDL specification recently published by the Coalition’s Technical Committee. The specification is published in full on the Coalition website.

SECTION 3: Directory and Appendices provide an explanation of the structure of the Workflow Management Coalition, and include an authors’ appendix, WfMC officers and a membership directory.

Reviews: 2
Agantrius
If you're involved in business process or workflow design, or business process reengineering this book will prove to be an invaluable resource. What I like is that there is something for those who are new to workflow as a discipline, as well as for seasoned professionals. Each chapter is a paper written by an expert in their respective field, and the editing holds this book together in a coherent manner.
For the new practitioner the first two chapters of Section I clearly explain workflow and architectures. They are followed by six chapters on topics ranging from business process and process management issues, to web, peer-to-peer and XML architecture - all of which are important elements of workflow and process engineering.
Section II covers workflow standards as they relate to the work of the Workflow Management Coalition, and is completely up-to-date, especially with respect to WF-XML. Note: there are related standards flying about, such as BPEL4WS, WSCI, BPML, OASIS and a plethora of others - but many of those are marginally related to workflow at best, and at worst are political posturing among vendors and other organizations. This book sticks to a much narrower (and, in my opinion, purer, agenda-free) set of standards.
Section III is a collection of case studies from which the seasoned and new practitioner can both learn. I personally liked this section the most because of the different viewpoints and methods presented, all of which led to success and recognition for excellence in implementing workflow solutions.
The final section, IV, was of marginal interest to me - it's a collection of appendices that covers the Workflow Management Coalition organization, membership and briefs about the authors who contributed to this book.
In addition to this book I highly recommend the 2001 edition, which is filled with related information, none of which is out of date. In fact, instead of getting the book, get the CD ROM version titled "Workflow Handbook 2001 Companion CD ROM" (ISBN 0970350910), which contains the entire contents of the book in PDF format as well as much more content. If, like me, you are more interested in the case studies, the editor (Layna Fischer) has assembled four books of case studies: "Excellence in Practice: Innovation and Excellence in Workflow and Imaging" (ISBN 0964023350), "Excellence in Practice Vol II" (ISBN 0964023369), "Excellence in Practice Vol III" (ISBN 0964023385) and "Excellence in Practice Vol IV" (ISBN 0964023393).
If a CD ROM companion for this book is published as it was for the previous edition it would add considerable value to this book, but it's still an essential resource for anyone who I identified as the target audience.
Thiama
The Workflow Management Coalition (WfMC) was founded in 1993. Since its founding, the WfMC has published several annual handbooks, and it has just released its latest handbook, the 10th anniversary edition. As before, the Executive Director of the WfMC, Layna Fischer, has served as the editor.
This is an interesting time for the WfMC. It was founded during the fever years of Business Process Reengineering. Later, interest in workflow, as with BPR, seemed to wane. During that same time, however, companies like SAP, PeopleSoft and Oracle were incorporating workflow engines into their packaged application suites, making the interest in workflow techniques more pervasive than ever. The recent interest in EAI, the Internet, Web Services, XML, and BAM have all combined, however, to make workflow a hot topic again.
Suddenly CEOs and CIOs are very interested in business processes. Both the Internet, in general, and discussions of Web Services, in particular, call for standard ways of defining and communicating about business processes. EAI vendors have grown prosperous helping companies integrate applications to enable them to interact with Web customers and business partners. Gartner has recently argued that Business Activity Modeling, or BAM, is a hot new IT concern. IBM, Microsoft, SAP, Oracle, SUN, BEA and CSC, among others, are interested in creating XML languages and business process management engines to automate business processes. Most observers understand that BPEL and BPML are really just the latest examples of the workflow approach. Suddenly everyone is interested in processes and workflow.
Over the years the WfMC has created a number of specifications. One might think that after nine years, the WfMC had defined its territory. In fact, however, it is more active than ever. During the past year, for example, it has released version 1.1 of it's Wf-XML standard, and of version 1.0 of it's new XML Process Definition Interface (WPDL). Wf-XML allows workflow tools to transfer data to each other via XML files. XPDL defines a metamodel for workflow processes and a way of importing and exporting via XML. In addition, the WfMC is working with the Business Process Management Initiative (BPMI) to define a Business Process Management Notation (BPMN) which will serve as a graphical way of representing XPDL (and other languages). In addition, individual members are working with the OMG to define a MOF-compliant business process model, and new standards for business rules.
All of the interest in workflow and business processes has created a demand for the latest information of workflow systems, workflow standards, the development of workflow applications, and the latest thinking on how workflow is likely to evolve. The 2003 Workflow Handbook provides all the answers in an authoritative manner.
The 2003 Workflow Handbook is divided into three sections. In the first, experts in various areas of workflow offer their opinions and observations on the latest developments. There are several good papers here. Connie Moore's (Giga) discussion of best practices is especially good, and Joreon Stoffele and Fred van Leeuwen's (DCE) discussion of the use of workflow in securities processing is an important article for those interested in financial process automation. The article on Business Processes and Business Rules, by Jean Faget (W4), Mike Marin (FileNet), Patrick Megard (ILOG), Vincent J. Owens (Cap Gemini Ernst & Young) and Laurent-Olivier Tarin (ILOG) is outstanding. They provide an excellent status report on how rule-based management systems are being used today and suggest how they will increasingly be used in the future. In addition, the article on enterprise infrastructure, by Mike D.Gilger (Identitech) presents several good ideas, and the article on Emerging Technologies by Jon Pyke, the Chair of the WfMC (and CTO of Staffware) provides a nice overview of the field as it stands today and where the market is heading.
The second section deals with workflow standards. Here a variety of authors offer basic explanations of the standards that are being developed. I especially liked the articles on B2B Interoperability by Alan Rickayzen (SAP) and Keith Sewnson (Fujitsu), and the introduction to XPDL by Arnaud Bezancon (ADVANTUS). Another particularly interesting article, to my mind, was the article by Stephen A. White (with SeeBeyond, when he wrote the article, and now with IBM) on XPDL and BPMN. White begins explaining the BPMN effort and illustrating some of the symbols that the task force has settled upon. Then he walks readers through an XPDL example and shows the mapping between the graphical diagram of a e-order process and its XPDL representation. David C Hollingsworth (Fujitsu) has compiled an update to the WfMC Glossary that takes all the recent activity into account. For readers who haven't looked at workflow systems for awhile, a quick review of the glossary might be the best way to begin this book.
A final section includes a directory of WfMC officers and a complete WfMC membership list.
This isn't a book one reads from cover to cover. It really is a handbook with an approximately 50 page workflow glossary, detailed information about the companies involved in the WfMC, and a series of articles that range from general to rather technical. As I have already suggested, however, workflow and business process automation are of great interest to lots of people in IT, and this book is the perfect way to get a good update on whatever aspect of workflow you are most interested in learning about.
If you are involved in workflow or business process automation, you'll want to read several chapters in this book and then you'll want to keep it on your bookshelf as a handy reference.