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ISBN:1423524772
Author: Ila L. Kolb
ISBN13: 978-1423524779
Title: Laser Transmission Through Simulated Cirrus Clouds
Format: lrf mbr rtf doc
ePUB size: 1103 kb
FB2 size: 1112 kb
DJVU size: 1491 kb
Language: English
Publisher: Storming Media (2001)

Laser Transmission Through Simulated Cirrus Clouds by Ila L. Kolb



Laser transmission through simulated cirrus clouds Author(s): Ila L. Kolb; William . Cheng; William Cotton. Cirrus clouds regularly cover approximately 20% of the globe 1. Understanding laser and other electo-optical transmission in the presence of cirrus clouds is an important consideration for astronomical observations, various lidar systems, and new laser systems like the USAF Airborne Laser

Laser transmisison through simulated cirrus clouds by one-layer and multiple layer propagation models. Ila Kolb, William Cheng, William Cotton. Published: 11 June 2001. by American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. in 32nd AIAA Plasmadynamics and Lasers Conference. 32nd AIAA Plasmadynamics and Lasers Conference ; doi:10.

Cirrus clouds regularly cover approximately 20% of the globe 1. Understanding laser and other electo-optical transmission in the presence of cirrus clouds is an important consideration for astronomical observations, various lidar systems, and new laser systems like the USAF Airborne Laser. Simulated cirrus cloud data generated by the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) is used as input to a laser propagation code developed at University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). This code computes realistic laser transmission values through a 1-D cirrus cloud layer

We show some examples of real and simulated return signals of airborne and space-based LIDARs. For a space-based LIDAR even for subvisible cirrus clouds the contribution from multiple scattering is substantial, for water clouds it is absolutely dominant. For an airborne LIDAR multiple scattering is much less important. The simulations have been done using variance reduction Monte Carlo methods allowing for controlling the variance.

A near-infrared laser transmission model involving thin cirrus clouds has been developed for an aircraft– target system, primarily for tactical applications. Transmission produced by multiple scattering is. Fig.

Laser ttering through inhomogeneous cirrus clouds. Appl Opt 2002 Sep;41(27):5744-54. An IR transmission model for thin and subvisual cirrus clouds composed of hexagonal ice crystals with a specific use for target detection has been developed. To facilitate the scattering and absorption calculations for hexagonal column and plate crystals in connection with transmission calculations, we have developed parameterized equations for their single scattering properties by using the results computed from a geometric ray-tracing program.

Kolb, Ila Laser Transmission Through Simulated Cirrus Clouds Advisor: Cotton. Loechl, Erica Intraseasonal Oscillations and the Southeast Asian Monsoon Onset Advisor: Johnson. McLeod, Raymond Analysis of the 1998 Southeast Asian Monsoon and the Diurnal Cycle in the South China Sea Advisor: Johnson. Schrumpf, Bradford D. Identification of Potential Aircraft Icing Regions Through Multispectral Analysis of GOES-8 Imagery Advisor: Schubert. Stepaniak, David P. An Initial Value Problem Study of Free Waves on a Barotropic Vortex Advisor: Schubert. Stocker, Roger A. Numerical Examination of Long-Range Dispersion using RAMS with a Climatological Analysis for the MOHAVE Field Study Advisor: Pielke.

The possibility of horizontal orientation of ice crystals can enhance transmission of laser beams in the aircraft-target geometry. Transmitted energy is strongly dependent on the horizontal distance between the aircraft and the target and on the cloud optical depth.

Infrared transmission through cirrus clouds: A radiative model for target detection. Liou, K. Y. Takano, S. C. Ou, A. J. Heymsfield, and W. Kreiss, 1990: Infrared transmission through cirrus clouds: A radiative model for target detection. Applied Optics, 29, 1886-1896, doi:10. Times Viewed on OpenSky: 42 Times Downloaded on OpenSky: 0.

This is a AIR FORCE INST OF TECH WRIGHT-PATTERSONAFB OH report procured by the Pentagon and made available for public release. It has been reproduced in the best form available to the Pentagon. It is not spiral-bound, but rather assembled with Velobinding in a soft, white linen cover. The Storming Media report number is A673993. The abstract provided by the Pentagon follows: Since approximately 20% of the globe is covered with cirrus clouds at any given time, it is clear that any airborne or spaceborne system using a laser will intercept cirrus clouds at some point. Cirrus clouds contain a very complex microphysical structure that will affect laser power by scattering and reflecting it away from the intended target, thus reducing efficiency and possibly even making it ineffective. Using two thin cirrus laser transmission models, a single homogeneous cloud layer model and a multiple cloud layer model, laser transmission profiles are generated from a simulated cirrus cloud case created by the RAMS model. Sensitivity studies are performed on the laser transmission model to examine the effects of aerosols and water vapor, ice crystal orientation, multiple scattering contributions, and the differences between the single and multiple layer models. Different parts of the RAMS simulated cloud are examined as well as the development of a particular cloud feature. The two different laser transmission models are compared against each other for a variety of different cirrus cloud conditions within the simulated case. Optical depth is a cloud variable that is fairly well measured using remote sensing techniques and airborne lidar. Average optical depth is examined as a viable parameter to indicate the likely transmission through a cloud.