» » Conscience of the Beagle
Download Conscience of the Beagle epub book
ISBN:1880448297
Author: Patricia Anthony
ISBN13: 978-1880448298
Title: Conscience of the Beagle
Format: docx lit azw doc
ePUB size: 1987 kb
FB2 size: 1671 kb
DJVU size: 1504 kb
Language: English
Publisher: Wildside Pr; 1st edition (November 1, 1993)
Pages: 201

Conscience of the Beagle by Patricia Anthony



I look back, but can’t see the other cab. Better than I expected, the undercover God’s Warriors. And Vanderslice is more deadly than I’d ever believed. The door opens darkened living room. Beagle’s standing by a lamp in the den. You look like shit. I collapse into an overstuffed chair. Beagle brings me iced water and a white tablet. He sits and watches me take it. I got the pattern, he says. It’s all centered around Paulie Hendrix. My hand’s shaking too much.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Conscience of the Beagle as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

About book: Major Dyle Halloway is investigating a series of terrorist attacks on the planet Tennyson. But his obsession with the brutal murder of his wife is endangering him and his entire team. Only Beagle, an android with the mind of a dead investigative genius, knows the truth-about both cases. From the author of Brother Termite. Other books by Mystery & Thriller.

Terrorists are loose on TennysonEarth has sent its toughest cop to the planet Tennyson to uncover who is behind the terrorist attacks. None of the evidence makes sense. Everything points to Tennyson’s government as the prime suspect in the bombings-and Major Dyle Holloway and his team are there at its invitation. Is Minister of Science Vanderslice really there to help, or does he have his own plan to catch the killers?But Holloway is still carrying a case with him, the brutal murder of his wife-the only case he never solved. Conscience of the Beagle Patricia Anthony. Terrorists are loose on Tennyson. Earth has sent its toughest cop to the planet Tennyson to uncover who is behind the terrorist attacks.

Conscience of the beagle. Publication date 1995.

Four top notch investigators are dispatched from earth to a peaceful colonial world to capture the terrorists responsible for a series of deadly attacks. The ideas are fresh and the feel is unique. The characters are well developed and the action moves along at a good pace. The author does have a problem however with sentence/paragraph structure and as a result the prose comes off as jerky and confusing

It was my first experience with a Patricia Anthony book, but I'm fairly well read in science fiction overall. If you're looking for some good ol' comfy sci-fi reading with a couple big plot twists to spice up the read, this book is a great place to start - at 240 pages, it's a quick read. Holloway is haunted and sad. Beagle - an enigma to all but himself. Who killed Holloway's wife? What force is behind the revolution on Tennyson?

Anthony's meteoric rise to the novelistic front ranks is thoroughly deserved. Major Dyle Holloway and his team-Szabo the psychic, demolitions expert Arne, and the humanoid robot Beagle-are sent by Home Force of Earth to planet Tennyson, a religious dictatorship now enduring a series of terrorist bombings in which prominent scientists and dissidents have been killed. Handicapped by guilt over his failure to solve the murder of his wife, Lila, Holloway is further inhibited by knowing that one of his team is a spy; neither does he trust Vanderslice, Tennyson's Minister for Science.

Conscience of the Beagle is science fiction police noir. It certainly had all of the necessary noir tropes: rundown, has-been protagonists, gritty mean streets, some sort of corruption or conspiracy, and one or two women as empty plot devices rather than actual characters (protagonist can't move past dead relationship). Ugly people, ugly scenery, ugly imagery, ugly premise, ugly resolution, plus the stereotypes and cheap exploitation of women (yes, I know the author's a woman). And I suspect calling the android a beagle was a reference to Darwin and the theory of evolution. But while I could perhaps recognize the presence of allusions and metaphors, I wasn't able to interpret much of the symbolism. Someone who was able to connect all of the dots would probably have a deeper appreciation for this work.

Several of her short-fiction works were republished in the 1998 collection Eating Memories. Her 1998 mainstream novel Flanders is the highly metaphysical story of an American sharpshooter in World War I.

Traveling to the planet Tennyson to confront a terrorist, tough Earth cop Major Dyle Holloway realizes that the ghosts of his past are threatening his mission as he is thrust into a vortex of paranoia and betrayal. Reprint. K. LJ.
Reviews: 5
LiTTLe_NiGGa_in_THE_СribE
This book came highly recommended to me from an extremely literate friend. It was my first experience with a Patricia Anthony book, but I'm fairly well read in science fiction overall.
If you're looking for some good ol' comfy sci-fi reading with a couple big plot twists to spice up the read, this book is a great place to start - at 240 pages, it's a quick read. Also, like all (well, most) good science fiction, this story rightly focuses on the unfolding human drama (in the context of new technologies) and one of the main devices used to keep you on the edge of your seat is the strongly protagonist-centric view of the world. A tangled weave of interplanetary political intrigue, religion, sexuality, and J. Edgar Hoover style police state paranoia add a lot of texture to the story.
Likes:
- Holloway's (the protagonist) inner tragedy, while overly analytical, rang true from a basic emotional standpoint.
- Anthony's rendition of an emotionally unbalanced man's view of love and sex shows an refreshingly perspicacious view.
Dislikes:
- The book tries to accomplish an awful lot in 240 pages. The reader gets just a brush with the texture alluded to above. For example, the Beagle, an artifically created personality construct, could have been developed more. Compare cf. the constructs in "Nature's End" by Strieber and Kunetka.
- For me, this book was uncomfortably similar to "Caves of Steel" by Asimov. Earth in political turmoil with an advanced off-Earth human colony? A sci-fi detective story? A government dictated artificial economic stratification of society with overpopulation of Earth? Constructs vs. robots?
Takeaway: it keeps you in suspense, it's got some very interesting plot twists, you won't be sorry you read it, but it won't change your life either (rather, it didn't change mine).
unmasked
I have now read all of Patricia Anthony's novels, griping about the way she apparently can't seem to close a book. I don't know the chronological order of printing but this just happens to be the one I read last. And apparently I saved the best for last. Finally, an earth-shattering climax!

This book contains everything that makes her other novels such compelling material. Interesting, unique characters. Pathos, unique writing style, compelling plot. Everything. This one also has the kind of ending I've been waiting for. Unexpected, leave my mouth hanging to the floor shocking.

Based on her other books I can understand why her books sell for a penny everywhere. My complaint about the endings is a valid one, I think, and may be a huge contributing factor to their lack of popularity.

Still it's a shame that she hasn't written anymore. This book proves that she can do it, and do it big.
romrom
Patricia Anthony is science fiction's best kept secret. It's really rather sad because she's probably one of the best contemporary novelist and short story writers around. Her novel Brother Termite managed to subvert a genre that had become little better than cliche. In the process she also managed to satirize politics, our view of aliens and our obssessive/compulsive media.
Essentially, isn't quite what he seems and neither is this richly plotted mystery sf novel. I'm not going to recap the plot here as it's been done quite well in the amazon.com review but suffice to say that Anthony, like Phil Dick, takes science fiction (and other genre)conventions and likes to turn them inside out/upside down. Then she procedes to wrap a characters around the skeleton of the plot and finally top it off by wrapping her novels (and short stories)in a narrative skin that keeps your attention regardless of the length of the story.
I'd also recommend Anthony's Flaunders. It redefines the literary war novel. A pity she hasn't written anything new in some time.
RUL
Take a pinch of hard-boiled detective fiction and mix it in with some science fiction and throw in a dash of political thriller for good measure. If what you came up with was more than the combination of its parts, then you may be as good a writer as Patricia Anthony.

Describing the plot of this book does not do it justice. Like Dick, Anthony uses science fiction tropes and plot points to engage in a meditation on the nature of being human.

One of the best books, from one of speculative fiction's (or any kind of fiction, actually) unsung writers.

Find a copy if you can and give it a read.
Fearlessrunner
Conscience of the Beagle (1993) by Patricia Anthony - 201 pages - rating: 6/10

Four top notch investigators are dispatched from earth to a peaceful colonial world to capture the terrorists responsible for a series of deadly attacks.

The ideas are fresh and the feel is unique. The characters are well developed and the action moves along at a good pace.

The author does have a problem however with sentence/paragraph structure and as a result the prose comes off as jerky and confusing. This problem continues through out the entire book and almost totally ruins what would otherwise have been a compelling story.

An excellent ending and the best sex scene ever in a science fiction novel save Conscience of the Beagle from a dismal 4/10 rating.

Claus Kellermann

2006 Aug 5

[email protected]