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ISBN:0972887970
Author: Item Chapter Project Team
ISBN13: 978-0972887977
Title: And Then There Were Eight: The Men of I Company 442nd Regimental Combat Team, World War II (Revised 1st Edition, 2007)
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Language: Spanish
Publisher: Item Chapter; 1st edition (2008)
Pages: 457

And Then There Were Eight: The Men of I Company 442nd Regimental Combat Team, World War II (Revised 1st Edition, 2007) by Item Chapter Project Team



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Redirected from 442nd Regimental Combat Team). The 442nd Infantry Regiment is an infantry regiment of the United States Army and is the only infantry formation in the Army Reserve. In total, about 14,000 men served, earning 9,486 Purple Hearts. The unit was awarded eight Presidential Unit Citations (five earned in one month). 201 Twenty-one of its members were awarded Medals of Honor. Its motto was "Go for Broke". Inactivated in 1946, the unit was reactivated as a reserve unit in 1947 and garrisoned at Fort Shafter, Hawaii. Most Japanese Americans who fought in World War II were Nisei, born in the United States to immigrant parents. Shortly after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941, Japanese-American men were initially categorized as 4C (enemy alien) and therefore not subject to the draft.

The 442nd Regimental Combat Team of the United States Army, was composed of Japanese-American enlisted men and mostly Caucasian officers. They fought primarily in Europe during World War II, beginning in 1944. The families of many of its soldiers were subject to internment. The 442nd was a self-sufficient force, and fought with uncommon distinction in Italy, southern France, and Germany. The unit became the most highly–decorated regiment in the history of the United States Armed Forces, including 21 Medal of Honor recipients.

The 442nd Regimental Combat Team (RCT) was organized on March 23, 1943, after more than a year during which Americans of Japanese descent were declared enemy aliens, 4-C, by the . It had taken all that time plus several key events to convince the Roosevelt Administration that these men should be allowed to enter combat for their country. Eventually, the 442nd, joined the combat-hardened 100th Infantry Battalion (first Japanese American Unit in WWII), comprised of Japanese American draftees from Hawai'i, became the most decorated unit in .

442nd Regimental Combat Team of World War 2 fame. This unit was organized from Japanese-Americans during a time when the US did not trust anyone who looked like a Japanese. Japan had just attacked the US and declared war. Americans joined the Army to go into war and fight the Japane. A Regimental Combat Team was a unit that was not large enough to be called an "infantry division". It did have 3 battalions and support artillery and engineers

The 442nd Regimental Combat Team (RCT) was organized on March 23, 1943, after more than a year during which Americans of Japanese descent were declared enemy aliens, 4-C, by the . Eventually, the 442nd, bolstered by the combat-hardened 100th Infantry Battalion, comprised of Japanese American draftees from Hawai'i, became the most decorated unit in .

Lyn Crost (442 nd /100 th War Correspondent): They had fought not only a foreign enemy, but also prejudice and suspicion. And they had set the standard for Japanese American soldiers who followed.

The fear was widespread in the United States and especially in Hawaii and the West Coast. An overwhelming 10,000 men from Hawaii came forward. Motivations of the Nisei By volunteering for military service, the Nisei knew that they were going to be able to escape internment. They wished to overcome the fear of other Americans to their ethnicity. They wished to retaliate against the Japanese for its attack on their country.